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-JAMES-'s Photo -JAMES- Posts: 13,846
5/19/19 10:56 A

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HOWBOUTTHISNAME,
When entering the text for a post there is an "ADD A LINK" button just at the top of the message box. If you use that it adds a start and end "link" tag around the website page and makes it clickable.

After adding the link, you might want to edit the https down to http.

Here is your link done that way, first with https
www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/oh-dear-the-twi
nkie-diet-actually-works-268743/


And second with just http
www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/oh-dear-the-twi
nkie-diet-actually-works-268743/


But neither link works for me!?

Edited by: -JAMES- at: 5/19/2019 (14:09)
James
Alberta, Canada


All time highest weight : 217 pounds

Starting weight : 195.0 pounds (June 7, 2012)
Final weight : 168.2 pounds (July 23, 2013)


 current weight: 169.0 
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HOWBOUTTHISNAME's Photo HOWBOUTTHISNAME SparkPoints: (1,675)
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5/18/19 9:33 A

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You can google this for the details, but there was a guy who did the so-called "Twinkie Diet" to prove just this point. He only ate junk food from convenience stores (Twinkies, Doritos, stuff like that) with some canned vegetables to round it out. He did limit the calories, but it was almost entirely junk food. Guess what - he lost weight AND improved his numbers (cholesterol, BP, etc.)

This isn't to say it's a good idea or a healthy eating plan, but his aim was to prove that calories do count and a restricted calorie diet - regardless of the source of the calories - will drop the pounds. And also that losing weight, by any method, will improve your numbers.

Of course most of us will never do this crazy thing, but it is a rather enlightening experiment!

Here is a link to the story:

https://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/oh-dear-the-twinkie-diet-actually-works-268743/

Edited by: HOWBOUTTHISNAME at: 5/18/2019 (09:35)

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JUSTDOIT011's Photo JUSTDOIT011 SparkPoints: (54,250)
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5/6/19 3:40 P

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And this is assuming both individuals are also working out equally -- strength training and cardio. Obviously if their workouts are different, then we could seen different outcomes with their body composition as well.

"One may walk over the highest mountain one step at a time." - Barbara Walters


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JUSTDOIT011's Photo JUSTDOIT011 SparkPoints: (54,250)
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5/6/19 3:38 P

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Theoretically, I think person A and person B yes, could lose the same amount of weight in X amount of weeks, and the number on the scale would be the same. However, their bodies would start to look differently over time --

If person A is eating nutrient-dense foods and getting adequate protein (SparkPeople recommends 20% of your calories each day to come from protein, so 100g protein/day on a 2000 calorie diet), they will preserve their muscle mass while losing body fat, and so at the end of X number of weeks, their body fat percentage would go down...may have lost 10 pounds total, but the breakdown might be closer to losing 12 pounds of fat, and gaining 2 pounds of muscle. Not to mention their blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL and HDL cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, would likely all improve.

If person B was also consuming 2000 calories a day, but this time, about 50% nutrient-dense foods and 50% junk (refined sugar, saturated fats, little nutrient value or fiber, etc), they may also lose 10 pounds total in that same X amount of weeks, but that might be losing 9 pounds of fat and losing 1 pound of muscle -- especially if they aren't meeting their protein needs (100g per day on a 2000 calorie diet).

So even though the scale reads that both individuals "lost 10 pounds total" -- person A would look smaller because they lost 12 pounds of fat and gained 2 pounds of muscle, while person B only lost 9 pounds of fat (and lost 1 pound of muscle). Person B may also look/feel a lot more bloated as well if they've been eating a diet high in sodium (I know my stomach bloats up after I eat out at a restaurant / eat a high sodium meal).

Just an example there...but basically YES diet quality matters-- not only for your own health parameters (blood pressure, cholesterol, brain health, heart health etc) but also for your body composition and body fat percentage.

"One may walk over the highest mountain one step at a time." - Barbara Walters


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DIANEDOESSMILES's Photo DIANEDOESSMILES Posts: 27,743
5/6/19 12:13 P

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I weighed 115 in my 20s and LOOKED healthy, however I learned that my fat content was VERY high for my age/BMI.

Oh it caught UP to me!! Here I am!! I never ate freggies nor drank water. Fast forward decades and I eat freggies(though not perfect at it, greatly improved) and it's RARE I drink soda, juice, but rather 97% of my fluid intake is water.

So in my golden years, I am MUCH HEALTHIER than in my 20s

I agree, it varies at least in the short term, but in the long term? What we eat, we are or will become.

Diane
EDT - Greater Portland Area in Maine
AWESOME A's as the CL 5% Challenge
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I get to CHOOSE My HARD!! Hard to watch what I eat? Or Hard to walk, breathe etc. It's MY CHOICE! I Choose my HARD to be happy and fulfilled by not filling myself UP with food


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SP_COACH_DENISE's Photo SP_COACH_DENISE Posts: 43,580
5/6/19 10:32 A

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As others have said, it would be difficult to say with certainty if the results would be the same. Our bodies aren't machines and they react to things in many different ways, which means there are too many variables in play to say one way or another. What works for one may not always work for another and as another coach that I have worked with has said, we are all an experiment of one. We know that eating junk food isn't good for our health, but how one processes it or other foods (as mentioned in another post here) will be a factor in how much someone loses or gains weight. Unfortunately, that's not something that can have an actual answer as a hypothetical question.

Coach Denise

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ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (220,617)
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5/6/19 9:25 A



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URBANREDNEK makes a good point about how people define healthy food or junk.

Just as an example, pork rinds.

my PERSONAL opinion is that pork rinds/skins have to be just about one of the single most unhealthy foods a person could eat.

However, there are those on KETO (or low carb) who routinely eat rinds and do consider them healthy because they are low carb, gluten free, no sugar, etc.

For someone low carb, the fresh baked bread I eat is junk.


Edited by: ARCHIMEDESII at: 5/6/2019 (09:25)
URBANREDNEK Posts: 9,942
5/5/19 7:23 P

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I'm going to go a bit against the trend here, and say "possibly".

Understand that "calories in" as we track them is firstly just an estimate of the total calories in that particular type of food item, and secondly isn't necessarily reflective of how many of those calories end up actually digested and used by the body. Differences in time of day food is eaten, the makeup of an individual's gut microbiome, the physical length of a person's colon, what they eat in combination, what a person's hormones are doing, and a few other variables all will impact just how many of those estimated "calories in" are actually digested - and how many are excreted by the body.

With this in mind, it is absolutely possible that Person A could actually be digesting more calories in their "2000 calories of perfectly clean food" and might be getting less usable nutrients than what Person B is digesting and absorbing from their 1000 calories of "perfectly clean food" and 1000 calories of "junk".

There is also the issue of what Persons A and B define as "perfectly clean" and what is "junk", since those definitions can absolutely make a difference. Many of the "clean eating" types think that any grains are "junk" - especially refined grains - and many take issue with legumes / pulses, dairy, and other food types that others would consider quite healthy.

It is apparently possible (although difficult) to get in all necessary nutrition (vitamins / minerals / fibre) in a lower calorie amount (or so the "experts" keep telling all of us women when they recommend a 1200 calorie diet), so your Person B could be eating enough essential nutrients to support a healthy lean tissue base, while adding in enough "junk" purely for extra energy to support their activity.

Personally, I find it to be too much work to worry about "perfectly clean" vs "junk". I choose foods that I really enjoy which give me all of the vitamins and minerals and fibre and essential fatty acids and proteins that I need to maintain all healthy levels when monitored medically. Along with those, I choose other foods that I really enjoy which may not be as nutrient-rich, but which give me the extra calories that I need to support my activities. There are a lot of my choices which other people would consider "junk", but they work for me.

Realistically, it is impossible to accurately determine just how many calories and nutrients are in each specific food item we choose, how many calories and nutrients we will actually digest at that time, and how many calories we actively burn with our base metabolism and activities. We are working with estimates (and often wild guesses), so it really doesn't make a lot of sense to get too focused on specifics. The madly extreme definitions of "clean" and "healthy" don't help, either, so we each really have to just work with our doctors, and be honest with ourselves as to what is "healthy enough" for us as a way of eating and lifestyle that we enjoy enough to keep for the rest of our lives.

Edited by: URBANREDNEK at: 5/5/2019 (19:25)
Sir Terry Pratchett: "Science is not about building a body of known 'facts'. It is a method for asking awkward questions and subjecting them to a reality-check, thus avoiding the human tendency to believe whatever makes us feel good."

"The Inuit Paradox" ( discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-
paradox
): "...there are no essential foods—only essential nutrients. And humans can get those nutrients from diverse and eye-opening sources. "

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ARCHIMEDESII's Photo ARCHIMEDESII SparkPoints: (220,617)
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5/5/19 4:49 P



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What people don't realize is that the QUALITY of those calories has a bigger impact on a person's waistline than just eating less.

There really is a difference between someone eating 2,000 calories of nutrient dense foods versus someone eating say 1,000 calories of nutrient dense foods and 1,000 calories of McDonalds.

How healthy do you think a person's body will be eating 1,000 calories of McDonalds a day ? Let's say they are exercising and burning those calories. Will they lose weight ? YES ! will they be healthy ? Probably not after eating all that saturated fat, sugar and sodium.

Good health isn't just about weighing less. When a person eats nutrient dense foods, that causes their internal organs to become healthier. When your insides are healthy, that reflects on the outside.

Where your calories come from matters. Quality trumps quantity.

We've all said it before,"you can't outrun a bad diet with exercise".

Edited by: ARCHIMEDESII at: 5/5/2019 (16:50)
-JAMES-'s Photo -JAMES- Posts: 13,846
5/5/19 4:36 P

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In the extreme (not quite your scenario) person B would eat 2000 calories, say just sugar. Their muscles would reduce over time, and body fat up. They couldn't build anything the body needs, nothing to build muscles or any cells from.

You scenario is not quite so stark, but over time person B would loose lean mass, and probably gain body fat, more than person A anyhow, and probably be sicker or more prone to illness.

James
Alberta, Canada


All time highest weight : 217 pounds

Starting weight : 195.0 pounds (June 7, 2012)
Final weight : 168.2 pounds (July 23, 2013)


 current weight: 169.0 
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LUANN_IN_PA Posts: 30,388
5/5/19 2:37 P

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Probably not, as many other variables come into play.

"We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand."
~ Randy Pausch

"There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when circumstance permit. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses, only results."
~ Art Turock

"We have a saying in Tibet: If a problem can be solved, there is no use worrying about it. If it can't be solved, worrying will do no good."
~ 7 Years in T
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5/5/19 11:14 A

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Hi everyone,

Just out of curiosity . Let's say we have 2 people that are virtually identical in physical features, same gender, height, weight, body fat%,etc. If Person A eats 2000 calories of perfectly clean food and Person B eats 2000 calories of half healthy and half junk food, would Person A and Person B lose a similar amount of weight AND body fat %?

I know that eating healthy will make Person A less hungry and feel better overall,
but I'm curious about what the actual results would be if both people followed the same plan over a longer period of time. Thanks.



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