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Fruit = safe

Monday, February 22, 2021

"Seventeen people were made to eat twenty servings a day of fruit. Despite the extraordinarily high fructose content of this diet, presumably about 200 grams a day—8 cans of soda worth—the investigators reported no adverse effects (and possible benefit actually) for body weight, blood pressure, and insulin and lipid levels (fats in the blood) after three to six months. More recently, Jenkins and colleagues put people on about a twenty-servings-of-fruit-a-day diet for a few weeks, and no adverse effects on weight or blood pressure or triglycerides, and an astounding 38-point drop in LDL cholesterol.
(.....)
An emerging literature has shown that low-dose fructose may actually benefit blood sugar control. So having a piece of fruit with each meal would be expected to lower, not raise, the blood sugar response.


nutritionfacts.org/video
/how-much-fruit-is-too-much/


nutritionfacts.org/video
/if-fructose-is-bad-what-a
bout-fruit/


"Dried fruits are calorically dense. Should we be concerned that eating dried fruit may make us fat? Remember that fig study I covered, that added 14 figs to people’s daily diets? Surprisingly, that did not lead to significant weight gain.

Wait a second. That’s 300 calories of figs a day. Over five weeks, that’s 10,000 calories. Did they disappear into thin air? No. Figs are so packed with fiber, and satiating, that even without trying, people just ended up eating less of other foods throughout the day. I get full just thinking about eating 14 figs a day.

Was this just a fluke, though? Let’s look at those other new studies. What about adding three-quarters of a cup of dried apples to your diet, every day, for a year? 200 extra calories a day—but no significant change in weight. 200 extra calories of prunes a day, for a year? No significant change in weight. And, the same thing with a month of a daily 300-calorie load of dates.

In general, the 5-10% of Americans that average a tablespoon or more of dried fruit a day tend to be less overweight, less obese, have a slimmer waist, and less abdominal obesity. They tended to eat more, but yet weighed less. Similar findings were found for those that eat nuts or nut butters—lower body mass index, and a slimmer waist. "
nutritionfacts.org/video
/do-fruit-nut-bars-cause-w
eight-gain/
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