HTMLJENN
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Relearning is hard, and sometimes embarrassing

Sunday, October 23, 2016

I was eating dinner last night and I realized that I really do like broccoli. On Tuesday I had a similar reaction when I was eating my salad. And a few days before that I was more interested in the salad and vegetables than I was in the spicy chicken teriyaki.

Why is it such a shock to discover that I like vegetables?
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I've liked them in the past.

I think a lot of my issue with veggies is the convenience or lack thereof. To make a salad I have to expend effort cutting up vegetables and mixing the dressing. To eat chips I just open the bag. To eat broccoli I have to cut it up and microwave it. To eat a cookie I just open the box.

It's also a speed thing. When I'm hungry, I am hungry NOW, not in 5 minutes when the broccoli is done. That chip bag is fast too.

Honestly, I think the key for me is to find a way to fall in love with cooking. If I look forward to the preparation of the food then I'll be more open to doing it and thus not as concerned with how "hard" it is to do it. And if I'm looking forward to the task of cooking, the time it takes won't bother me either.

So............ how do you fall in love with cooking? (Lol, instead of "cooking" I almost wrote "cookie" which I already know how to fall in love with...)
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  • IMLOCOLINDA
    I have always loved the "art" of cooking. And for years I have stopped and said a little "prayer" before beginning food prep. Vegetables are such a beautiful gift from the Gods. Some day I will blog about the "star" in each vegetable...but cut an apple horizontally and the "star" of seeds is amazing. It touches me as a gardener to wash and prepare something that only months before was a seed I planted in the ground and nurtured and now will nurture it further into some wonderful concoction that will nurture my body and my soul. Cooking can be a beautiful experience and we should focus on that...it leads to mindful eating experiences.

    One thing I would suggest is to put on some tunes that you like and wash and chop. It's a way of looking and thinking about the vegetable and what you are going to use it for. Celery as an example. I take the whole bunch out of the cello and throw it in the sink and use the sprayer to wash it, separating the stalks (but not breaking them off just yet) just getting the dirt off. Then pull of some of the outer ones and lay them side by side on your cutting board and cut them into equal size sticks. I like to make it a game to have a baggie full of perfectly sized sticks. Add some water so they can absorb a little of it and become even crisper. Then you will have a smaller bunch to deal with. Cut off the top just to open up the 'veins' and then just slice across the whole bunch-stalks and leaves combined-about 1/4 inch. I do this down the bunch about 6 inches and end up with about 2 cups of chopped celery. You can throw it into green salad or use it in stir fry or soup. It keeps well for up to 5 days in a zip top bag in your crisper. Put the rest of the bunch back in the cello to chop later in the week. Same with the carrots. Peel a few and then make stick and chop some. Peppers-red, green, yellow, orange. I also chop onions at the same time. Now you have items to add to your green salad, to use as a base for vegetable soup, stir fry or most recipes that are quick to throw together once the prep work is done. I keep them in zip top bags in the crisper just so I can see what's in there. It's easy to grab a baggie of celery sticks, carrot sticks and pepper slices and have a nice crisp snack! I have no idea what kind of diet you are doing but I boil 6 eggs at a time and make a dozen deviled eggs. Quick to wolf down and a great source of protein. Also great to add to your salad! I have found that keeping quick things helps me stay on track. Having that immediate thing to put in your mouth and chew on while you prepare your meal, priceless. I found doing that prep work all at the same time helps me to think creatively of ways to use the ingredients. Celery added to some chopped apple and walnuts becomes Waldorf Salad. Grated carrots and chopped added to raisins and a touch of mayo as a binder becomes a sweet little salad. Chopped celery and onions added to tuna...you will figure it out! And save money! And think of yourself and your goals as you are doing it. You are worth it!
    1187 days ago
  • ALICEDIXIE
    I love broccoli too. It has to be cooked just right though. I steam mine.
    1191 days ago
  • LIFESGREAT2DAY
    I know what you mean!
    I food prep now, it helps a ton knowing all my salad fixings and veggies I plan on cooking for the week are already chopped and washed in containers and ready to go! It takes a lot of time and mess in the kitchen to get it all ready, but it's sure a load off during the rest of the week!
    I even batch cook things like farro and quinoa and freeze it for use later on...sooo easy.
    I mix my salad dressing in a mason jar, shake and keep it in the fridge to use all week.
    1191 days ago
  • MMEQUEEN
    I do the make up extra approach too. Or I eat veggies raw!
    1191 days ago
  • LAURALYNGARLAND
    Make up extra when you're cooking then freeze the left overs. When you know you won't have time to cook anything go ahead and lay out what you've frozen that morning or the night before for a quick grab later that day
    1191 days ago
  • LIBRARYGAL11
    Try pre cutting a bunch of veggies when you have time. Then they will be just as easy to grab as a cookie or chips. I know this helps me.
    1191 days ago
  • MWARNER211
    I LOVE cooking mostly because I love the taste of food & trying new things. Try looking into quick& easy meals that take little prep& time to cook& work your way up. Sometimes it's easier to prepare ahead when you're NOT hungry. Good luck 😃
    1191 days ago
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