PJH2028
25,000-29,999 SparkPoints 29,788
SparkPoints
 

Resilience - see spot stay ;-)

Thursday, September 17, 2015

This is the word. The one that keeps being the answer to What do I need? What do I need more of? Where is blank to be filled...etc.

So... How glad am I to find a Spark article on the subject this morning? Terrifically.
I will write more about my own relationship to Resilience .... in future.
For now... Here is a cut-and-paste of what I found in the emoticon emoticon article this morning. Maybe you read it too?

" There are a lot of personal strengths that are helpful for achieving permanent weight loss: determination, perseverance, self-discipline, even organizational skills. However, the one strength I believe to be vital is resiliency.

Resiliency is the capacity of humans to come out of extreme shock, damage, injury and trauma and get back to normal life. However, Robert Brooks, author of The Power of Resilience, feels that we should not foster a resilient mindset just to safeguard against the possibility of unfathomable crisis and tragedy. His research has led him and others to believe that a resilient mindset will help us handle even the "minor" setbacks, disappointments and problems of ordinary living.

Another author and researcher in the field of developing resiliency is Emily Werner. She states, "Resilience reflects the concept of 'reserve capacity.' It helps us prepare for future adversity and enables the potential for change and continued personal growth."

I particularly like this concept as it relates to permanent weight loss, which requires adjustments to one's habits and lifestyle. Many who achieve and maintain their weight-loss goals report that they have changed not only in body size but also in mental toughness, finding strength, perseverance, and determination they didn't know they had—and developing, sometimes for the first time in their lives, the inner belief that they can succeed at whatever they put their mind to. Along with weight-loss success came increased confidence and self-esteem, not necessarily because of their new body, but because of their success at reaching a goal.

I would define resiliency as our ability to bounce back from life's adversities and difficulties within a reasonable time frame, and the ability to be flexible and adapt to difficult circumstances. Simply put, when we are resilient, we stand up again after falling down, learn from and evaluate our mistakes, and keep trying even if we have to change directions. When working toward a goal we find meaningful and valuable, we don't give up. In my mind, fostering a resilient mindset is vital for permanent weight loss.

f you are thinking resiliency is an innate strength of a lucky few, the good news is you can definitely strengthen your resiliency muscle. Here's how to become more resilient in the journey of weight loss—and in life.

6 Keys to Resiliency
1. Accept and face difficult situations head on. Anticipate in advance that challenging situations will arise all the time. Almost every week is marked with a birthday party, unhealthy temptations or busy workdays at home or the office. Be proactive rather than reactive, and plan how you will handle the challenge. Learn moreabout developing a Plan B to stick to your goals.

2. Believe in your own inner strengths. Take time to remind yourself of past successes in other challenging areas of your life. Identify the strengths you used then, and apply those strengths to your weight loss journey. This is a good exercise to try in the beginning of your journey. Write down those successes in a blog post or a journal. When you start doubting yourself, return to them for motivation.

3. Reframe your thinking. Tell yourself that setbacks are temporary, not permanent. Focus on what is still working, rather than the area where you lapsed. Remind yourself of all the things you did well before that small setback, then celebrate the next thing you did well, like getting up for your morning workout the next day rather than beating yourself up over the thing you did wrong.

4. Talk back to your inner critic. Despite a difficult week, it doesn't mean you are a failure, you'll never lose weight, or all is lost. It only means you had a difficult week, and you have the opportunity to do better in the upcoming one.

5. Try to learn from your setbacks. Mistakes and slip-ups aren't failures; they are learning experiences. Gather data to help you move forward in the future and avoid a similar issue. Treat them as learning opportunities.

6. Find a cheerleader. Children who grow up to be resilient and highly successful adults report there was one person in their life who never stopped believing in them. Brooks refers to these individuals as "charismatic adults." When it comes to weight loss, having just one supportive, significant person in your life is essential. Whether it's a coach, your trainer, spouse or best friend—even your mom—hearing from, remembering, and receiving encouragement from someone who believes in you will help you achieve your goals and strengthen your resiliency muscle. If you're not sure where to start or don't have a cheerleader in your real life, you'll find plenty of support in theSparkPeople Community.


Sources
Brooks, Robert and Sam Goldstein. 2004. The Power of Resilience. New York: McGraw-Hill."
Share This Post With Others
Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • BIGMAMAT
    #5 learn from your set backs. Seems like I am always evaluating my progress...
    #6 Thanks for being my cheerleader Paula! emoticon
    1006 days ago
  • BONNIEMARGAY
    One of the ways I have used resilience to lose 100 pounds is finding new ways to soothe myself without food. To me, that is the difference between toughing it out and leaning into it. I had to forge an entirely new relationship with me so I could do the same with food.
    1007 days ago
  • LILLYROSEGRAM
    Well said! Thank you for sharing this information. It is important for all of us to understand.

    emoticon emoticon
    1007 days ago
  • SMOKNTOKN
    Yes to this!!
    1008 days ago
  • Add Your Comment to the Blog Post

    Log in to post a comment


    Disclaimer: Weight loss results will vary from person to person. No individual result should be seen as a typical result of following the SparkPeople program.