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SELF Magazine, showed us what being a bully looks like?

Thursday, March 27, 2014

My oldest is 26, the youngest 11. I have sat through endless school meetings on anti-bullying. Bullying is simple really, making someone feel bad about themselves just because you can.

Self Magazine recently ran a picture that they solicited from a company under false pretenses. The company is Glam Runner, the picture is of the two founders running the LA Marathon in Under Armour superhero t-shirts and matching tutus. The picture sadly appears on the BS meter in April's edition of the magazine. More appalling is the author saying that women who wear these tutus seem to think they will make us run faster. Um, no? Who thinks putting a couple yards of tulle around your hips will make you go faster? Anyone? I'm insulted that the author didn't give us, women, credit for knowing that a tutu is an attitude boost, not a speed boost?

Better yet, Glam Runner MAKES tutus and sells them, 2000 to date. They donate profits of these to Girls on the Run, an organization designed to get girls running. This is Self magazine deciding that tutus and this business model are "lame." Their words, not mine. Now Self is a women's magazine devoted to fitness. So far they have managed to make fun of two women running 26.2 miles. They have managed to lump anyone in a tutu lame, because they can.

Doesn't matter if it's an 8yo tackling her first 5K, a Disney princess taking on the Disney World Marathon or Tinkerbell Half Marathon. Nope, you're all lame because we here at Self magazine said so...

We have a women's fitness magazine belittling two women running 26.2 miles, two female business owners, two members of a running community, two supporters of non-profits that encourage girls(aka future readers of Self) to run. Whether it's underwriting a local 5k, Sparkle and Shine, or donating to Girls on the Run the ladies at Glam Runner put their money where their mouth is, Self delivered a half baked apology to the local news station-not even the women in question.

Hold up, this is bullying at it's finest? Why are we spending money to teach anti-bullying when
a major magazine owned by Conde Nast can do it and then say. "Oops, our bad?"

We wouldn't let our 11yo get away with that response? We shouldn't let our business owners do it. I'm sorry, did I fail to note that one of the runners has DIE TUMOR DIE! on her racing bib? Why? Well because Monica, not wearing the bib, was midway through chemotherapy for brain cancer. Let that sink in, running a freakin' marathon during chemo? Seriously?

The advertisers in Self need to re-evaluate their support of this magazine. There's got to be a more worthy recipient of your advertising dollars?

Self needs to buy every scrape of tulle these women have and outfit every staffer in a tutu, print a retraction that is something along the lines of "hey, we're idiots, we weren't really bashing on other women who were running, a sport we support..." As a show of said support for all our future readers we are making a sizable donation to Girls on the Run.

The apology also needs to say, "when we here at Self said to follow your dreams as rule #5 in another article in the same edition, we meant dreams that we have approved and deemed worthy, not owning your own business kind of dream."

I just completed the Pinkest 10k in Santa Cruz, there was a sea of Pink, 5000 runners worth. Tutu's, crazy socks, face paint, wigs were all there. This run supports a local women and children's shelter for battered women.Who cares what we wear? Who has the nerve to say from an editorial desk or couch, "not cool!"

No one has that right! Whether you are flying through a marathon, huffing and puffing through your first 5K or swimming through mud and zombies, no one can take that accomplishment away from you! You put your sneakers on and took a step and kept stepping until you crossed the finish line and that my friends is HUGE! So don your tutus and get on with your bad SELF!
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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • no profile photo CD8703805
    emoticon Thanks for standing up! emoticon
    2403 days ago
  • DAISY443
    Shame on a magazine that I will never buy! Thanks for sharing a great blog!
    2403 days ago
  • OSDOWNS
    We only think of bullying in our schools and with children. Thank you for pointing out an example of this is our "adult" society. Thank you for your insights.
    2403 days ago
  • LOSINGLINNDY
    emoticon emoticon Thank you!
    2404 days ago
  • GETFIT2LIVE
    I've never been fond of SELF, but I really do not like it now. I hope their sales tank big time over this so there are some changes in policy and staff there. The apology they issued on their Facebook page doesn't begin to make up for the cruel, snarky, bullying comment that was published, and I don't think there is anything they can say or do in print either. Obviously no one that approved the picture and comment is a runner or talked to anyone who runs about why we wear tutus (or wings or costumes of all kinds) when we run. Kudos to everyone who laces up their running shoes and wears whatever they like when they go out there.
    2404 days ago
  • WOUBBIE
    The editor in chief of that rag apologized, and said she was mortified.

    But tell me this. Would she have apologized had the tutu-wearer NOT been a cancer victim? I bet not. No, she would felt totally justified in making fun of it.

    Thank you, thank you, for posting this. I posted on Self's FB page and I'll buy one of those tutus just because.

    EDIT: They're not taking orders right now because they're getting slammed with success, lol. So I made a small donation to Girls on the Run instead, in memory of SELF Magazine RIP.
    2404 days ago

    Comment edited on: 3/27/2014 5:54:01 PM
  • EMMACORY
    emoticon I do not buy this magazine. Your observations will make people think. Thanks for sharing. emoticon
    2404 days ago
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