POPEYETHETURTLE
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Weird or Strange?

Saturday, November 30, 2013

Some people think that I may go 1/2 story more or less than the top - they may be right.

I've always been attracted to the strange and sometimes just plain weird about things that very few people know (or care) about on our earth or about our bodies.

I am going to share this weird trivia with people who drop in, stumble or just purely fall on to my Spark Page. If I've ever experienced any of the weird things about the human body, all of you who know me are already suspecting I'll have a story.

Here are the first two:

A mole can dig a tunnel 300 feet long in just one night!
It would take the average human approximately 60 days to build a tunnel that long (Assuming you didn't need to build supports or bracing for the tunnel).

The brain doesn’t feel pain: Even though the brain processes pain signals, the brain itself does not actually feel pain.
You have to be putting me on! I get migraines so bad I have to be hospitalized and usually given morphine or its equivalent to stop the pain.

It's not your brain that is hurting. The brain is processing pain signals usually associated with swelling or constriction of the blood vessels. The second most often place that causes head pain is some sort of inflammation deep in your eyes.

Yes, I've personally experienced them. Thankfully only three times in my life. I tried three different OTC pain relievers, but I learned what regular migraine sufferers know - they don't work.

The first migraine I ever experienced was when I was in the military. I woke up one morning with that, "Drat! I'm getting a headache" feeling. I took a prescription strength amount of Ibuprofen (sometimes called 'Ranger Candy'), showered and dressed. We were in the middle of an exercise, so I walked to our Operations tent, checked in with my XO and went to sick call. After a couple of tests, I was taken about 50 clicks to the nearest military medical facility (by that time, I was blind).

The emergency doc checked my out, took a skull series of x-rays, then told me I would shortly have relief because he was giving me a quarter grain of morphine.

About 5 minutes after the shot, he came in and I couldn't feel any difference - so he admitted me and administered another shot. About 10 minutes after that shot he arrived again and I told him I thought there might be a little relief because I could blink my eyes open.

Another shot of morphine was administered and he said, "I guarantee this shot will put you to sleep".

It didn't.

When he came to check on me about 30 minutes later, I was still awake, but my head felt like it was only a bad headache. I could open my eyes but still had to squint. The doc said, "I've given you the max dose of morphine I can give you. By rights, you should be totally unconscious. I'll order another medication and we'll see what happens from there".

When the nurse came in with the next shot (my butt was starting to feel like a pincushion) she said, (Lt. C, I've never seen ANYONE take a maximum amount of morphine and even be awake, let alone be alert, talking and still feeling pain. This medication is guaranteed to put you out for the night - and probably part of tomorrow".

When the doc came in 45 minutes later, I told him, "Thanks doc, I feel I can go back to my unit now. I can just feel a sort of ghost pain, but I'm ready to roll".

"Lieutenant, you aren't going anywhere. I'll be back shortly."

It was 2-3 minutes later when the nurse came back with a medic, and they proceeded to unlock the wheels on the bed and move me to the Intensive Care Unit. They started a saline drip, then used sandpaper to scrape a spot (well, 12 of them,actually) and attach a bunch of wires. I asked, "What is all of this for?" and in typical Med speak she tried to baffle me with as little as possible said in lay English. Using Med speak she told me the doc was holding me for observation because I might have had a TIA or I might have one developing.

I told her, "Well, it must be one developing because I can raise both arms above my head", and proceeded to do so.

Her eyes opened wide as she said, "Oh, I'm sorry. They didn't put anything in your chart to indicate you were a....a nurse?" (Doctors start out on active duty as a Captain, Nurses start as lieutenants - in that period of time, there were about 5 male nurses in the whole military.)

Laughing, I told her, "Nope, but my mother is an RN working in cardiology. When she came home, she would often talk out her days while winding down - and I listened. When she used Med speak, I'd ask her what she meant. I can bandage woulds and she taught me to give shots - I'm great with oranges, but I've never been to school for anything".

When they had me all hooked up, the doctor came in and administered another dose (I can't remember the name of what he used) through the IV.

"Well, Lieutenant, you'll be here for24 hours. There are some great nurses here to watch over you and if you need anything, just let them know." Before I could say, "Yes, sir", he had left the cubical and vanished.

That shot did work and I mentally turned out the lights and went to another dimension, far, far away.

I later learned he had written in my medical records that I had a high resistance to pain meds and I might have a high tolerance for pain. Both of those were true at the time, but whatever they use now takes less than 5 seconds to put me down for the count.
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