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I may as well eat my desk for breakfast!

Wednesday, October 31, 2012

As I was having my breakfast this morning, I came across an email from a concerned relative. The email contained a link to an article in the Independant from 2010 that pitted the big mac vs an egg in terms of saturated fat.

Now, it IS true that an egg has more cholesterol than a burger, but the article is slightly biased, and by 'slightly' I mean incredibly, stupidly, OTT fear-mongering, as it doesn't elaborate further on the damage eating junk food does to your body. It just focuses on maligning the egg.

In addition, the study is not content to simply compare the humble egg to a McDonalds Big Mac, it adds in fries as well. FRIES, people! The article ingeniously states that an egg has more cholesterol than a burger PLUS fries. The implication is, you can do less damage at McDonalds than you can at home making an omelet.

I have dealt with concerned family and friends before. They worry about how I am ever going to live without bread and cereal. They send me links that question my cavewoman lifestyle (OMG, you eat all that fat??) Then ask why can't I eat a more balanced diet - balanced meaning pastries, pizza, crisps.

In turn I send them counter studies and articles explaining why I prefer low-carb. Often, we agree to disagree. I let them have their grains, they allow me my meat and veg. But this article riled me up. Mainly, as further on it states that if you have high cholesterol/heart disease you should stay away from: meat, poultry, fish (fish?), shellfish and dairy and eat more grains and cereals. To be fair, they mention eating vegetables and fruits too, but grains are at the top of the list.

At that point I was so furious I couldn't speak. I know starting the morning off with high blood pressure is not good for my own heart, but it makes my blood boil that media/researchers/doctors constantly give the public conflicting advice. In many cases it is agenda driven, someone (certainly not the public) is benefiting from this crazy imbalance.

Let me tell you, the fear of fats paranoia started in the 80s has not improved anyone's health one little bit. We are fatter and sicker as a populace than ever before in our history. How can we be a technically advanced society and yet we are not able to combat obesity, heart disease and diabetes?

Studies like this one only make people more confused about what they should avoid. To suggest restricting poultry and fish and eating more cereals and grains, or hey, even a burger and fries instead of an egg, is preposterous, misleading, even negligent.

I'm not saying people with high cholesterol shouldn't be careful about their diets but that does not mean you have to subsist on foods with little to no nutritional value just because it contains lower saturated fat.

You know what else doesn't have cholesterol? My desk. But you won't find me eating it for breakfast.

Here's the article in case you too want to fume. http://www.independent.co.uk/l
ife-style/health-and-famil
ies/big-mac-vs-the-egg-212
3129.html
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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • KICK-SS
    I would say, "B.S." At least that's my opinion. I eat eggs every single day, at least one and often times 3 or 4. My cholesterol levels are fine.
    3090 days ago
  • SHESMITH1
    ...I don't know..., you'd get a lot of fiber in that desk!
    3090 days ago
  • ALISHAB3
    Jillian Micheals that fat phobia is a dinosaur. Its nonsense. My gyn told me to go low carb for my PCO. Once I learned that my metabolic syndrome/PCO is punctuated by lipid deficiencies, I gave up trying to reduce my fat intake. Then when I learned that my kidney's don't love protein very well, now the only thing that is really safe for my body is fat. Its my friend.

    emoticon Vilifying an egg: really.
    3091 days ago
  • MAHGRET
    I find it annoying not only that someone makes these studies, but that someone feels they must email them to me.
    3091 days ago
  • no profile photo CD13257462
    My husbands cardioligist says an egg a day is fine as long as it's boiled eggs. Cholestrol isn't an issue unless the egg is fried in butter or bacon grease. emoticon
    3091 days ago
  • HOUNDLOVER1
    Those types of articles frustrate me too, especially when my loved ones take them seriously. Take a look at the cholesterol series on Peter Attia's blog that should provide enough evidence for them and their doctors that neither saturated fat nor high cholesterol levels are a problem at all.
    You can also approach it with humor and say that it's only dangerous if you eat one egg, but if you eat a 4-egg omelett with bacon cooked in butter or coconutoil it reverses the effects of the first egg. Then send a photo along where you are eating that. emoticon
    3091 days ago
  • no profile photo CD8634484
    Actually the cholesterol in eggs is good cholesterol not bad! I thought that myth was well and truely dead, obviously not. Eat on!
    3091 days ago
  • no profile photo CD9922996
    It is amazing isn't it? A great documentary (in case you haven't seen it) is Fat Head by Tom Naughton that describes how fat came to be so reviled and (incorrectly) targeted as the reason why we're so fat (hint: government panel overruling scientific minds and making broad unscientific statements to public that nevertheless benefit the grain farmers). Free streaming on Hulu at http://www.hulu.com/watch/196879.R>
    It takes a discerning mind to sift through the tremendous amount of junk science out there -- indiscriminate reporting just makes it worse.
    3091 days ago
  • ADELE66
    Sounds like plain old sabotage to me! I wouldn't even bother trying to state my case - it sounds more like control issues rather than concern about what you are eating.

    As for the article, the writer ought to be ashamed of him/herself!


    3091 days ago
  • no profile photo CD2244567
    emoticon emoticon
    3091 days ago
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