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Living Gluten-Free - Some Thoughts

Tuesday, October 06, 2009

Sitting at a restaurant table with five other people who are laughing and talking and I hear nothing spoken. I'm looking at them buttering and eating their bread while I sit there and realize that I'll never do this simple thing again. They all order pasta and I can't. I order a seafood salad that turns out horrible. I'm also the very last served at the table. This was my very first time eating out and being on vacation. The others didn't notice but I was really feeling very sad and lonely at that table. I made me sad to realize that I'll never be able to eat just anything off a menu anymore. That I can't order one of my favorite sandwiches or spaghetti, lasagne's or pizza. The old days of being able to eat anything anytime that I wanted to are all gone. I felt a lump in my throat when I thought about this. My old life is gone and my new one is starting. But through all this sadness I do know in the back of my mind that tonight I won't have terrible gas and bloating all night long. I'll be able to wake up the next day with out stomach pains. I won't have to run to the bathroom every hour or so. These are times I don't mind leaving behind. But, yes I'll miss eating a lot of my old favorites.
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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • 1GRNTHMB
    Judy,
    Eating out at restaurants can be one of the most frustrating parts of staying gluten free. Very few restaurants cater to gluten free people. But most restaurants are willing to work with you if you talk to them. I have a tendence to stick with eating breakfast foods or ordering steak or chicken after making sure they are wheat/gluten free. I have also found that most people do not know what you are talking about if you just say that you are gluten free. I found that it is easier to say that you have a wheat allergy and that you can not eat wheat (also say flour because people do not associate flour with wheat) and that you are also sensitive to barley, malt, rye and oats. Saying you have an allergy seems to open peoples eyes up and make them under stand. I got really sick of salads when I first went gluten free and started to ask the wait person if I they could find out what else I could eat.

    I know how you feel about being a social out cast just because you eat differently. But after a while you will get over that and not worry about what otheres think about what and how you eat.

    Take care,
    Mark
    3941 days ago
  • YOGATICHA
    Nana,

    I, too, am sorry for your loss. This blog was total honesty and raw feeling. Thanks for sharing.

    Love and Hugs,
    Leticia
    3942 days ago
  • NANCYLEE46
    Nana,
    Thank you for sharing so honestly. I think if we all admit it, go through a sort of grieving process for the foods we once loved and will no longer eat, at least like we knew them.

    I am looking for the day when all restaraunts have gluten free bread!!

    I did find a place that has gluten free pizza and beer!!

    God Bless,
    Nancy
    3954 days ago
  • ELENASAN
    Eating out can be the worst! I'm past the sadness--I really don't miss the stuff much anymore (and I've figured ways to cook a lot of it GF at home--rice and corn pastas are GOOD). Now I just get angry at how I often get treated like a 2nd class citizen. I'm traveling next week, and I dread the eating out part. I'm bringing a tote bag of food along.

    However...anymore, eating out is about the only thing I mind about being GF. Like you said, no more getting sick. Nights where I can now sleep without pain. Days when I have energy. I can WALK again without pain or fatigue. It's worth it. And once in a while, a restaurant will surprise me and give me an awesome meal.

    When in doubt, order ice cream. If you have to be deprived, enjoy it.
    3955 days ago
  • POSITVEGRRRL
    Nana, You were right - I like this blog. I like how very real and honest you are, especially about the lump in your throat. Change is tough in unusual ways. I think its important to grieve your loss. It's a big loss.

    Once you've gotten through some good honest grieving its time to look forward to your happier life. Keeping your focus on the fact that you will feel better and better everyday by steering clear of gluten, is very motivating and important.

    Listen to Mary Poppins and try to make it a game - a game to find out which restaurants have the best stuff that you can eat, a game to figure out new recipes and foods you can eat, a game to try the different gluten free breads on the market or make it yourself, a game to figure out ways to not let food get in the way of your Life.

    I'm sorry for your loss. I'm glad that you'll be feeling better.

    Love,
    Catherine
    3955 days ago
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