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Health A-Z

Medical Content Created by the Faculty of the
Harvard Medical School

Treatment

The treatment of hematuria depends on its cause. In general, people with exercise-related hematuria do not need any treatment other than to modify their exercise programs. People with drug-related hematuria will improve if they stop taking the medication that caused the problem. Antibiotics typically will cure infection-related hematuria. For other causes of hematuria, treatment may be more complex:

  • Kidney stones Smaller stones sometimes can be flushed from the urinary tract by drinking lots of fluids. Larger stones may require surgery or lithotripsy, a procedure that breaks up the stone.

  • Trauma Treatment depends on the type and severity of injuries. In severe cases, surgery may be necessary.

  • Tumor in bladder or kidney Treatment is determined by the type of cancer and how much the cancer has spread (its stage), as well as by the patient's age, general health and personal preferences. The primary types of treatment are surgery, chemotherapy, radiation therapy and immunotherapy, a type of treatment that stimulates the immune system to fight cancer.

  • Glomerulonephritis Treatment may include antibiotics to treat any infection, medications called diuretics that help to increase the amount of urine excreted from the body, medications to control high blood pressure and dietary changes to reduce the work of the kidneys. However, children who develop glomerulonephritis after a streptococcal infection often recover without any treatment. If it is caused by an autoimmune disorder, such as lupus, medications to suppress the immune system, including corticosteroids or cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar), may be prescribed.

  • Bleeding disorders Treatment depends on the specific type of bleeding disorder. Patients with hemophilia can be treated with infusions of clotting factors or with fresh frozen plasma, a type of transfusion that provides missing factors.

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From Health A-Z, Harvard Health Publications. Copyright 2007 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. All rights reserved. Written permission is required to reproduce, in any manner, in whole or in part, the material contained herein. To make a reprint request, contact Harvard Health Publications. Used with permission of StayWell.

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