Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.

Health A-Z

Medical Content Created by the Faculty of the
Harvard Medical School

What Is It?

Fragile X syndrome is an inherited disorder associated with mental retardation and a particular appearance. It is caused by an error in a small piece of the DNA (genetic blueprint) for the FMR1 gene. This gene is found on the X chromosome, one of the two chromosomes (X and Y) that determine gender.

In people with fragile X, a particular section of the DNA code CGG is "fragile" and gets repeated an unusually large number of times, compared with the normal 5 to 50 times. As a result, the FMR1 gene is not expressed (turned on), and the body cannot produce FMR1 protein, which is related to nerve function.

Depending on the number of CGG repetitions, fragile X can have a variety of physical, intellectual and behavioral effects. People with more repetitions tend to have more severe symptoms. For example, people with 200 or more CGG repetitions are described as having a full fragile X mutation and usually develop many of the symptoms of fragile X syndrome, including mental retardation. People with 59 to 200 CGG repetitions are described as having a fragile X premutation and may not show any obvious signs or symptoms of fragile X syndrome. The number of CGG repetitions can increase when the gene is passed from generation to generation, increasing the chance of developing the full fragile X mutation.

Fragile X syndrome is seen in approximately 1 in 4,000 to 6,000 males and 1 in 8,000 to 9,000 females. However, many more people carry the fragile X premutation, but show no signs or symptoms of the syndrome. Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of mental retardation in males.

Page 1 of 9     Next Page:  Fragile X Syndrome Symptoms
Click here to to redeem your SparkPoints
  You will earn 5 SparkPoints
From Health A-Z, Harvard Health Publications. Copyright 2007 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. All rights reserved. Written permission is required to reproduce, in any manner, in whole or in part, the material contained herein. To make a reprint request, contact Harvard Health Publications. Used with permission of StayWell.

You can find more great health information on the Harvard Health Publications website.