Fitness Articles

The Weight-Loss Side Effect That No One Talks About

Will I Have Excess Skin Once I Lose Weight?

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If you decide to pursue surgery, ask your family doctor for a recommendation. Don't be shy about interviewing multiple plastic surgeons until you find one you trust. You can search for a board-certified plastic surgeon in your area through the American Society of Plastic Surgeons website.

If you've experienced medical problems because of your excess skin, insurance will sometimes cover certain procedures. That's why it's important to see your doctor if you develop a rash, infection or strange odor in a skin flap. Not only can your doctor help diagnose the real culprit (for example, a fungal infection versus a yeast infection), you'll need documentation if you plan to pursue insurance approval for plastic surgery.

Amanda Gignac (POOKASLUAGH) recently recovered from abdominoplasty and panniculectomy surgery and shares the details of her decision and surgery experience on her SparkPeople blog. "I decided to go through with this surgery for two reasons," she explains. "The first had to do with health. My skin was severely damaged and the stomach muscles separated during my third pregnancy 10 years ago. For the last decade, I've dealt with constant skin infections, due to having very sensitive skin. In the last year, some of the skin that had been infected the most had started to change texture and color and I was worried about that. Plus, with my core muscles separated, many exercises were very difficult. My balance was always off, which contributed to back pain and hip, knee and ankle injuries. The second had to do with my mental health. I'd lost over 100 pounds and was at a healthy weight, but still felt like I wasn't really a success. I was still very self-conscious about my body all the time because of my stomach. I have stretch marks on many parts of my body, but I could live with that. No matter how much I tried, though, I couldn't come to love that extra skin on my abdomen or the way it made me look. It was holding me back from really feeling good about my weight loss."

Janet Gershen-Siegel (JESPAH) is quick to admit that her decision to pursue plastic surgery was partially driven by vanity. She documented her tummy tuck and breast lift in detail on her SparkPeople blog (here, here and here) and doesn't pull any punches when it comes to describing the grueling process of recovery. "It's been a few years and I am, overall, pleased with the results," she says of the surgery. "Even with some regain, my body shape is still better proportioned. That's essentially why I had it all done in the first place. I was (at the time) able to fit into medium-sized blazers, for example, but they would ride up my belly and hips as I had too much skin overhang. I also felt it was unattractive. The main thing that I think plastic surgery did for me was to make it harder, if someone had never met me before, to see that I had been over 300 pounds at one time." 
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About The Author

Megan Patrick Megan Patrick
Megan Lane Patrick has been a professional writer and editor for the past 16 years, and was a chronic dieter for at least 30. A combination of weight-loss surgery, mindful eating and daily exercise finally allowed her to maintain a weight loss of more than 100 pounds. When she's not lifting weights at the gym, you can find her walking shelter dogs as a volunteer for the SPCA.



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