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Make the Most of Your Seafood Catch

Selecting, Cooking, Freezing, and Storing
  -- By Becky Hand, Licensed & Registered Dietitian
Someone once said, “Show me a fish-hater, and I’ll show you a person who has never tasted properly cooked fish.” Whether you made a real catch, or just caught a deal at the grocery, follow these tips to make the most of your seafood. 
 
Seafood Selection
There are many varieties of fish that offer both great taste and versatility to your meal. Seafood is a general term that includes both finfish and shellfish. There are many finfish, including catfish, cod, haddock, flounder, mahi mahi, snapper, tuna, and trout; shellfish include crustaceans (crab, crayfish, lobster, and shrimp) and mollusks (clam, mussel, oyster, scallop, octopus, squid, abalone, conch, and snail). Here’s how to select the best:
Handle With Care
Seafood spoils more rapidly than almost any other food! To avoid that “fishy” taste and smell:
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Freezing Fish
Since fish is highly perishable, freezing is often required. Follow these easy steps for the perfect freeze:
  1. Cut whole, cleaned fish into the form in which it will be used (filets, steaks, etc.).
  2. Carefully wrap the fish in plastic wrap, aluminum foil, or freezer paper to protect the fish from air and freezer burn.
  3. Store frozen fish between 0 degrees to –10 degrees Fahrenheit.
  4. For best flavor and texture, limit freezer storage to one month.

Fish can also be frozen by “glazing.” Freeze it first uncovered on a tray, then dip frozen pieces in ice water and return to freezer. Repeat this dipping process several times to form a protective ice glaze. Finish by wrapping the fish tightly in aluminum foil and storing in the freezer. 

Thawing Fish
Thawing fish at room temperature or in warm water can be dangerous and promote food poisoning; it can also cause moisture loss, flavor loss, and a mushy texture. To prevent these unwanted effects: 
Cooking Fish
When preparing a meal, save fish preparation until last to avoid overcooking, which can destroy the flavor and appeal of fish. Also remember to: