Member Comments for the Article:

Members Share How They Save Money on Groceries

Over 30 Tips to Shrink Your Food Bill and Still Eat Well

81 Comments



  • I buy fresh fruit and vegetables twice a month from a wholesale outlet, I buy boneless skinless chicken thigh because you are paying for all meat, no bone or skin, then I measure and portion into freezer bags and freeze. I do that with all our meat.
    As for keeping lettuce fresh, I store in bags in a airtight container.
    - 1/2/2010 9:32:55 PM
  • If you have the time bake your own bread or find a bakery that sells whole wheat or whole grain breads cheaper than the chain stores. I also bake my own cookies and muffins using things like mashed banana, apple sauce, pumpkin puree or shredded zucchini.

    Buying only seasonal fruits and veggies from the local markets saves us a bundle (even if it means eating squash, broccoli and cauliflower for most of the winter months). - 11/14/2009 1:57:48 PM
  • Oliveme, i love that idea about the food co-op and sharing with someone
    at the end of the day! I always try to stick to a list and add it up as i go thru
    the store since my money pretty tight. Lots of time i shop at a Aldi and bye
    the store brand. This place sell milk less than $ 2.00 a gallon! - 10/24/2009 11:43:42 AM
  • When I buy meats on sale, I use my foodsaver vacuu seal bag. They are expensive to intially buy but they definitely work. I label/date the bags for the freezer along with the contents.

    When cleaning out your fridge, create one section for leftovers. I find that to be very handy. And, I also try to have a small section designed for lunch ideas. - 9/29/2009 8:56:55 AM
  • Bamajam: Yes, I have used those green bags and yes, they do work. I try to keep one for each vegetable/fruit and mark it on the outside with a magic marker.

    Great reading. Interestesting ideas. My first time on this site. - 9/29/2009 8:53:10 AM
  • I also use coupons to help lower my grocery bill. The best way to use coupons is to combine them with sales. With 4 kids my bill could be extremely high, but I manage to keep it between $75-$100/week. Besides the grocery stores sometimes you can catch really great deals on groceries at drug stores. I also go to a bakery thrift store to buy bread....I can get the specailty bread (my fav is a sugar-free whole grain bread) for a $1 there compared to $3 or $4 at the grocery store. I have a bread machine and would like to use it more, but with 4 kids, work and everything I just don't have much time to mess with it as much as I would like. - 9/12/2009 9:30:42 AM
  • My top 3 picks would be 1] always take a list ,2] try not to take your kids so you wont have cart surprises & 3] look for the oops stuff In the bread section I find good healthy things there or the browner bananas they are always cheaper & great for muffins, pancakes ,smoothies freeze them good for a rainy day bake. - 8/27/2009 5:19:21 PM
  • NEW1964
    Buy bone-in chicken breast, roast and freeze for quick lunches on the go. Shop discount stores for salad greens. It's cheaper and I have less waste. Shop fruit in season. Get staples from discount stores. By lean quality meats only when on sale. Use discount clubs for fish. Use tuna, beans, and brown rice to stretch dishes. Vegetable casseroles with ground turkey. Frozen fruits from discount grocery chains. By spices in bulk and grind at home with a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle. Grow herbs and dry for the off season. Grow easy vegetables in summer. Shop local ethnic markets for a variety of fresh vegetables that are generally cheaper than chains. Try to prepare a lot of different dishes on weekend and then frezze for easy access throughout the week. Keep easy foods on hand, e.g., eggs, tuna, peanut butter, oatmeal, sandwich thins, chicken broth, & frozen veggies; these can be combined in a number of ways to make quick and inexpensive meals. Parmesano reggiano is expensive but because it is so flavorful, I use less and can make it last longer. Skip as many processed foods as possible, eat out less. Invest in a good set of lunch and storage containers. - 8/25/2009 10:27:25 PM
  • NEW1964
    Buy bone-in chicken breast, roast and freeze for quick lunches on the go. Shop discount stores for salad greens. It's cheaper and I have less waste. Shop fruit in season. Get staples from discount stores. By lean quality meats only when on sale. Use discount clubs for fish. Use tuna, beans, and brown rice to stretch dishes. Vegetable casseroles with ground turkey. Frozen fruits from discount grocery chains. By spices in bulk and grind at home with a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle. Grow herbs and dry for the off season. Grow easy vegetables in summer. Shop local ethnic markets for a variety of fresh vegetables that are generally cheaper than chains. Try to prepare a lot of different dishes on weekend and then frezze for easy access throughout the week. Keep easy foods on hand, e.g., eggs, tuna, peanut butter, oatmeal, sandwich thins, chicken broth, & frozen veggies; these can be combined in a number of ways to make quick and inexpensive meals. Parmesano reggiano is expensive but because it is so flavorful, I use less and can make it last longer. Skip as many processed foods as possible, eat out less. Invest in a good set of lunch and storage containers. - 8/25/2009 10:27:13 PM
  • NEW1964
    Buy bone-in chicken breast, roast and freeze for quick lunches on the go. Shop discount stores for salad greens. It's cheaper and I have less waste. Shop fruit in season. Get staples from discount stores. By lean quality meats only when on sale. Use discount clubs for fish. Use tuna, beans, and brown rice to stretch dishes. Vegetable casseroles with ground turkey. Frozen fruits from discount grocery chains. By spices in bulk and grind at home with a coffee grinder or mortar and pestle. Grow herbs and dry for the off season. Grow easy vegetables in summer. Shop local ethnic markets for a variety of fresh vegetables that are generally cheaper than chains. Try to prepare a lot of different dishes on weekend and then frezze for easy access throughout the week. Keep easy foods on hand, e.g., eggs, tuna, peanut butter, oatmeal, sandwich thins, chicken broth, & frozen veggies; these can be combined in a number of ways to make quick and inexpensive meals. Parmesano reggiano is expensive but because it is so flavorful, I use less and can make it last longer. Skip as many processed foods as possible, eat out less. Invest in a good set of lunch and storage containers. - 8/25/2009 10:25:34 PM
  • I think the BEST way to save money on food is to not throw any of it away. I never throw away food. Just buy what you can eat! I eat "delicate" fruits, like strawberries, the first day I buy them. Don't expect your lettuce to last for 2 weeks. Just buy it and eat it- Plain and simple.

    I completely agree with BLUEBELLKNOLL. Save money on entertainment. Food is life, buy the good quality stuff.
    - 6/30/2009 1:33:24 PM
  • DAWNMARIEYOUNG
    3 things I have found that help when I go grocery shopping (especially with my husband) are: #1- take a list and stick to it. Check for all the ingredients you'll be using for the week (or longer). That way, when you are ready to make that special meal, you won't have to either go out and get what you missed, or rearrange your meal schedule.
    #2- Look for store coupons and go online for coupons; some have bonus buys that have REALLY good prices if you have the store card; they also have buy 1, get 1 free. We get roasts and are able to get the equivalent price or less at no charge. These are taken off at the end of the receipt.
    #3 and maybe one of the most important- DO NOT GO TO THE STORE HUNGRY!!!!! I make my husband eat something before we go, so there aren't any surprises when we get to the check out. I'm just as guilty of those impulse purchases, so I eat something to take the edge off, until we get home and I make dinner.

    Hope these help!

    dawnmarieyoung - 6/21/2009 6:37:16 PM
  • When turkey is on sale I buy it and grind the breast. I use an old fashioned cast iron meat grinder so I even get some exercise. The last time I got a turkey breast at 88 cents a pound, instead of $5 a pound for ground turkey breast, I paid about $2 a pound. - 5/26/2009 2:40:18 PM
  • Re the green bags for keeping items fresh: I have not used them but my friend has and she loves them. She is on her own and found previously that many items would go bad before she ate them; now she says she can keep lettuce crisp for 3 weeks and she is a very fussy person. - 5/26/2009 8:26:02 AM
  • I buy meats from a bulk store then freeze into individual packs; check the local flyers and plan menus from the sale items and items on hand; never go down an aisle that I don't need to; keep 2 bags in the freezer, one for cooked meats, bones, etc; the other for vegies including stems, ends, etc; when the bags have enough the items go into the slow cooker with spices, water and then we have soup; recycle freezer bags. - 5/26/2009 8:24:16 AM

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