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Reference Guide to Strength Training

An In-Depth Look

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  • OK so here's a question- my job has a fairly high (at times) physical component to it and I used to lift weight at home as well as other things until I injured my shoulder severely almost a year ago - could I have been overtraining? I know I have lost some strength BUT it was worth it to allow my shoulder to heal (along with physiotherapy).
  • would love to see more information on strength training for older adults - especially strength training that can be done at home without any special equipment for those that do not have a fitness center or gym nearby or simply can not afford to join one.
  • that was a good tip on increasing muscle mass and vertical jump training . try also to read this

    http://www.schoolofjump.com/courses/bask
    etball-vertical-speed-agility-strength
    -training/
  • that was a good tip on increasing muscle mass and vertical jump training . try also to read this http://www.schoolofjump.com/courses/basket
    ball-vertical-speed-agility-strength-t
    raining/
  • Thank you for this thought provoking article. Unfortunately, it does not take me long to reach the point of exhaustion!
  • i needed to read this!!
  • Lots of information here. Thanks.
  • I also have to take issue with this concept of HAVING to take a rest day. Do you think MINERS or FARMERS or anyone else that has a physical component to their WORK has the luxury of taking a DAY OFF you are kidding yourself.
  • This article is exactly what I have needed! Thank you
  • I learned a lot by reading this. I do want to get stronger so it gave me fuel to use to do this. so with this........my workout at home and weight lifting class I can get stronger and see more muscles......I like that.
  • I totally disagree with the statement that fewer reps builds stronger muscles. All that matters is that you work the muscle to failure NOT how many time you do a particular exercise,.If that were the case bodyweight exercisers would be hooped.
  • I disagree with the statement that strength training strengthens tendons and ligaments. I'd like to see where this has been proven. I have Ehlers Danlos so my tendons and ligaments (and other connective tissue) are too loose, causing my joints to dislocate frequently. Exercising, even gentle and no impact, causes more problems with my joints, not less. I have to pay close attention to everything I do because even one uncontrolled movement causes pain and dislocations. When I was in sports as a kid my joints actually became much worse, not better. Now my hips can dislocate just from walking. Thus my tendons and ligaments became weaker - not stronger - through exercise. If the Ehlers Danlos was diagnosed as a kid I would have been told to exercise less, not be in sports, and I would have had access to doctors who could provide proper braces for my joints well before my joints got to be this bad.

    There are also many cases of people who have torn tendons and ligaments through exercise (ever seen an achilles tendon snap while someone's running?). They're not being strengthened, but being tested and pulled.
  • I think this article makes a lot of really good points, and I'm really glad that the "Specificity of Training" principle was included - I just wish the SparkPeople Training Plan Generator would get the message. Since it's well documented that doing a leg day back to back with an arm day is totally fine since you're targetting complete different muscles, it's so *frustrating* that the workout generator *won't let you* enter back to back workouts on different mucles groups, reminding you that you shouldn't train back to back without a rest day (perfectly true, if you're using the same muscles). I realize that this is the wrong place to vent about this, and I've already raised it in the "tech" forum, but it seems I can't help myself - BAH!

    In any case, I was happy to see this idea, and others that are equally important, explained here clearly and accurately. Bravo.
  • Don't forget that water exercise, especially vertical exercise like water aerobics, has a strength component. Water resistance is 12x the resistance of air, so every move in every direction is evenly resisted. To add challenge similar to adding weight to dumbells, you can use various devices to increase buoyancy or drag resistance. You can employ speed, acceleration, and direction change to further up the ante. AND there's no danger of dropping a chunk of iron on your toe!

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