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6/9/08 4:10 P

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Don't forget Father's day in Reedsport. The annual chain saw competition will be held. Artists from around the world come and show off their talent! Great fun.

Come check out the Artists Team and Photographers Snapping away the pounds! teams.sparkpeople.com/photobugs


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6/9/08 3:40 A

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The area of the Reedsport was originally inhabited by the ancestors of the modern day Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua (Kuitsh), and Siuslaw Indians. The sixteenth century brought tales of contact between the local Native American Indians, Spaniards, and British explorers. By the 1700’s contact increased and by 1791 Lower Umpqua traded with ships that stopped at the mouth of the Umpqua River.1 Some of the first recorded contact between the Siuslaw and fur trappers from the Hudson’s Bay Company occurred in 1826. In 1828 conflict between the Lower Umpqua and fur trapper and explorer Jedediah Strong Smith resulted in the loss of many of Smith’s company.2
Fur trapping continued to grow in the area and in 1836 the Hudson’s Bay Company established a trading fort, Fort Umpqua, upriver near the modern day town of Elkton. In addition to fur trapping, the gold rush brought more Euro-American settlers to the area. Reedsport was established in 1852 and was named after a pioneer resident Alfred W. Reed. The post office was established in 1912 and seven years later the town was incorporated. Reedsport was built on marshy ground and was subject to frequent flooding; therefore buildings were elevated above ground.3 Primary industries in the 1900s included timber and fishing. In 1964 a devastating flood caused major damage to the community and a dike was built to protect the lower town. With the collapse of the timber industry in the late 1990’s, Reedsport continues to be supported by such industries as tourism, agriculture, and fishing.
Today the tourism industry is an important component of the Reedsport economy. The community is home to the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area headquarters office.4 A 50-mile stretch of sand dunes which offers hiking trails, beaches, 30 lakes, fishing, swimming,
interpretive exhibits, and wildlife watching. Campgrounds extend throughout the area. The Umpqua River Lighthouse is a short drive away in Winchester Bay. The Dean Creek Elk viewing area supports approximately 150 Roosevelt Elk on a 1000-acre reserve. Reedsport is also the home of the Umpqua Discovery Center that houses displays of the areas history.
Community events include the Tsalila Festival that celebrates Native American culture and traditions, and activities focused on watershed restoration and salmon recovery. Another popular event is the Ocean Festival, which includes U.S. Coast Guard Rescue Demonstrations and a Seafood BBQ. The Oregon Divisional Chainsaw Sculpting Championships, Dune Musher’s Mail Run, and Summer Concert Series are examples of other activities held throughout the year.

Local areas of interest include:
The Discovery Center in old town Reedsport which shows the history of this area.
Winchester Bay is located three miles south and has beautiful beaches, quaint shops and a small fishing fleet.
Lake Marie which has an easy one mile hiking trail around it. It is also where the U.S. Coast Guard Housing is located and where the lighthouse stands facing the sea.
Deans Creek Elk Viewing Area located three miles east of Reedsport where you can watch herds of elk grazing in fields along Highway 38.
Reedsport is located in the heart of the Dunes National Recreation Area so there are lots of sand dunes. The annual Sand Fest is held in August and folks from all over the U.S. come to compete in sand dune racing.



Kathy from Oregon

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5/31/08 2:05 A

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Lincoln City was incorporated on March 3, 1965, uniting the cities of Delake, Oceanlake and Taft, and the unincorporated communities of Cutler City and Nelscott. These were adjacent communities along U.S. Route 101, which serves as Lincoln City's main street. The name "Lincoln City" was chosen from contest entries submitted by local school children. The contest was held when it was determined that using one of the five communities' names would be too controversial.[3]

Former communities

Cutler City

Cutler City was located on the east shore of Siletz Bay. The community was started by Mr. and Mrs. George Cutler. It is claimed they received the property from Chief Charles "Charley" DePoe of the Siletz tribe (part of the present-day Confederated Tribes of the Siletz). Cutler City post office ran from 1930 until the formation of Lincoln City.

Delake

Delake was near Devils Lake, and was named for the way the local Finnish people pronounced the name of the lake. Delake post office was established in 1924, and reestablished as Oceanlake (see below) in 1927.

Nelscott

Nelscott was named by combining the surnames of Charles P. Nelson and Dr. W.G. Scott, who founded the community in 1926. Nelscott post office ran from 1929 until incorporation as Lincoln City.[4] Nelscott Reef is known for its surf and was in Surfer Magazine in 2003 as one of the Pacific Ocean's best places to surf.[5][6]

Oceanlake

Oceanlake was named for its position between Devils Lake and the Pacific Ocean. Its post office ran from 1927 until incorporation as Lincoln City. Also is now location of Oceanlake Elementary School.

Taft

Taft was named for the 27th U.S. president William Howard Taft. Taft post office was established in 1906, and was named when Taft was Secretary of War. The post office ran until incorporation as Lincoln City.[4]

In 1995 the Confederated Tribes of Siletz opened Chinook Winds Casino at the northern end of the city on property overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Although at first opposed by the local citizens, it provided a boost to the local economy, which is primarily based on tourism, by providing a year-round demand for hotel rooms.

Lincoln City is located at [show location on an interactive map] 44°57′60″N, 124°0′40″W (44.966630, -124.011209)[7].

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.4 square miles (13.9 km˛), of which, 5.3 square miles (13.8 km˛) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km˛) of it (0.56%) is water.

Lincoln City is home to one of the world's shortest rivers, the D River, connecting Devils Lake with the Pacific Ocean.



Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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5/6/08 3:39 A

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History
Coastline In the beginning . . . Before the jetties were built in the early 1900's, there was a wide sandy beach all the way from Garibaldi to Nehalem Bay. This beach served as the only access to this area, which was then known as "Garibaldi Beaches." The area remained nearly isolated to all but a few hearty souls who would drive up the beach by horse and wagon or walk during low tide.

After several unsuccessful plans for a railroad line from Portland to Tillamook, the Pacific Railway and Navigation Company promoted by Elmer E. Lytle opened to Hillsboro in 1906, and the first steam engine was delivered to the Tillamook end about 1907. The coastal land homestead claims, once considered near worthless, took on a new value, and a flurry of subdividing into town sites took place from 1909 on.

Rockaway Beach train station.
About 1910, the Pacific Railway and Navigation line ran flatcars as far as Salmonberry, and the first train from Portland arrived in Tillamook in October, 1911. The railroad was the vital factor in the development of the Rockaway area.

The train from Portland back in the teens and 20's was the main mode of transportation to the coastal communities. It was an all day, dusty, long trip by car over gravel and plank roads, so the old steam trains played an important role in those early days. The train left Portland around 9 a.m. and arrived in the Rockaway area about 2:30 p.m. An extra engine was used to help it over the summit.

The first passenger train came to Rockaway in 1912. At all the beach resorts in those days, it was quite an occasion when the Friday afternoon train arrived, bringing the daddies who were joining their families for the week-end, thus earning the name of "Daddy-Train."

Little Red Caboose (Visitors Center)Today you will find "The Little Red Caboose" that serves as The Rockaway Beach Chamber of Commerce office set up at the Wayside as a symbol and tribute to these beginnings.

The City limits of Rockaway Beach now encompasses the subdivisions or town sites from north to south named Manhattan, Highland Park Addition to Manhattan, Moroney Town, Lake Lytle, Beal's Addition to Lake Lytle: Seaview Park, Rockaway Beach, Elmore Park, Tillamook Beach (known as Saltair), Midway Beach, Twin Rocks, and a small portion of Ocean Lake Park. Information about these developments was gleaned from old abstracts, plat filings and records, as well as the stories of the early settlers and "summer people."

Garibaldi is on Tillamook Bay
The community's first white settler was Charley Farwell, cook on Capt. Robert Gray's ship, the Lady Washington. Farwell was put ashore after a disagreement with Gray


Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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5/6/08 3:22 A

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A Brief History of Seaside....
Incorporated in 1899, and named for Ben Holladay’s famous hostelry and resort, the Seaside House, Seaside has historically been one of the Oregon Coast’s most visited and most popular oceanfront resorts.

Located only 80 miles from Portland, the state’s largest metropolitan area, and surrounded by natural wonders and attractions, tourists and locals enjoy hiking in the coastal rain forest, bird watching, exploring tide pools, and looking for gray whales as they migrate along the coast each spring and winter. Surfing, kayaking, fishing, crabbing, bike riding and browsing the City’s numerous specialty stores and malls are favorite activities.

Seaside’s gently sloping 250-foot wide beach is the most heavily used of any along the Oregon Coast. Running a mile and a half along the beach is the historic Promenade providing tourists and local residents a place to walk, jog, or bicycle while viewing the beach.

History

The first recorded European American journey to this area was made by William Clark, one of the leaders of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, in January, 1805, when a group of Native Americans invited him to view a beached whale at the nearby beach. The expedition was headquartered at the time near the mouth of the Columbia River. Curiosity got the better of him and Clark had to journey south over Tillamook Head, which he described in his journal as "the Steepest worst and highest mountain I ever assended [sic]…" to get there. From a place near the western cliffs of the headland he saw "… the grandest and most pleasing prospects which my eyes ever surveyed, in front of a boundless Ocean…" That viewpoint is now called Clark's Point of View and can be accessed by a hiking trail which leaves Indian Beach within the Ecola State Park.

Upon arriving at what is now Cannon Beach, Clark and his companions found the flensed skeleton of a 105' whale on the beach and the Indians busily boiling blubber for storage. A 105' whale would have to be a blue whale. Clark was a professional surveyor so it is unlikely he was wrong. Clark and his small company bartered for some blubber and whale oil, then headed back home.

In 1846, a cannon from the US Navy schooner Shark washed ashore just north of Arch Cape, a few miles to the south of Elk Creek, the current Cannon Beach. The schooner was wrecked while attempting to cross the Columbia Bar, also known as the "Graveyard of the Pacific" because of the danger of the bar. The townspeople of Elk Creek renamed their town after the cannon. The cannon is in the town's museum and a replica of it can be seen alongside U.S. Route 101. Two more cannons, also believed to have been from the Shark, were discovered on Arch Cape over the weekend of February 16, 2008.

Highway 101 formerly ran through Cannon Beach. In 1964, a tsunami generated by the Good Friday Earthquake came ashore along the coast of the Pacific Northwest. While it did not destroy the town of Cannon Beach, it did inundate parts of it and washed away the highway bridge at the north side of town. The town was thus isolated from highway and to attract visitors they decided to hold a sandcastle contest-an event which is repeated annually to this day.[10] Cannon Beach is now an affluent resort town.


Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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5/3/08 12:57 A

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A little more info:

The Oregon Coast saw the only bombardment of the U.S. mainland from Japanese submarines during the World War II when several shells were fired at Battery Russell on June 20, 1942. Though the wrecked Peter Iredale was in the line of fire, no damage was done to it. The next day rolls of barbed wire were strung from Point Adams southward to hamper invasion. The Peter Iredale was entwined in the wire and remained that way until the end of the war.

Over a century since it ran aground, the remains of the Peter Iredale's rusted bow and masts are still visible jutting out of the sand and are a popular tourist attraction. The wreck is contained within Fort Stevens State Park as part of the Lewis and Clark National and State Historical Parks.


Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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5/3/08 12:55 A

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While in Fort Stevens State Park...we will see the remains of the Peter Iredale.

Date built: June 1890
Builder: R. Ritson & Co Ltd
Yard:
Maryport, Cumbria
Yard No: 59
Dimensions: (m) 87,59-12,10-7,13
NRT: 2075
Rig: S4B
Built for: Peter Iredale
Code:
Official No: 97750
Sails: Royal sails above double-top & topgallant sails
Date bought: 1890
Service life: 16 yrs.
In service until: 1906
Service ended as ship was wrecked

Remark 1 Wrecked at Clatsop Beach, Port Adams, Columbia. All crew rescued.
Date 25.10.1906

Remark 2 Salina Cruz, Mexico in ballast for Portland, Oregon

Remark 3 Wreck still visible at low tide. Major tourist attraction for Fort Stevens State Park, Astoria OR Date 1998

1. Transcript of the Naval Court findings (Issued in London by the Board of Trade on the 24th December 1906.)

"(No. 7011.) "PETER IREDALE."

FINDING and order of a Naval Court held at the British Vice-Consulate, Astoria, Oregon, on the 12th and 13th days of November, 1906, to investigate the stranding of the British four-masted barque "PETER IREDALE"

The "Peter Iredale" was a sailing vessel, four-masted steel barque, of 1,993 tons registered tonnage, official number 97790, and built at Maryport, England, in 1890, and belonging to the port of Liverpool, owners P. Iredale & Porter.

In appears from the evidence given before the Court that the ship sailed from Salina Cruz, Mexico, on or about the 26th of September, 1906, with 1,000 tons of ballast, and a crew of 27 hands all told, including two stowaways. No incident worthy of mention happened until the look-out sighted the light on Tillamook Rock at 3.20 a.m. on the 25th of October, 1906. The ship’s course was altered to E.N.E. until the vessel was five miles off the light. The course was then altered to sight the Columbia River lightship. This was sighted and recognized, it bearing N.E. In this position, finding the wind was veering to westward, and having lost sight of the light in a thick mist, it was decided to wear ship to avoid the influence of the current setting to the north, and the tide running into the Columbia River. The wind had now hauled to north of west in heavy squalls with rain. Just before striking, while in the act of wearing, an exceedingly heavy west north-west squall struck the vessel, throwing her head off, she taking the ground, and shortly afterwards losing her upper spars. She then drove ashore, with a high south-west sea running, and a fresh westerly gale.

We consider that everything was done by the master to get his ship out of danger, but that the set of the current and the sudden shift of wind drove him so close in that in the act of wearing around to get his ship’s head off shore, she stranded. The Court, having regard to the circumstances above stated, finds as follows:—

That the position of the ship before the shift of wind was not one of danger. She was in the usual cruising ground of the pilot schooner, but unfortunately no pilots were on the station, the pilot boat being in port under repairs.

We consider that prompt action was taken by the master immediately the wind shifted, to get his ship’s head off shore, and by all accounts he was ably seconded by his officers and men. Having carefully considered the evidence, we do find that the master, and his first and second officers, are in no wise to blame for the stranding of the said vessel, and their certificates having accordingly been returned to them.

The Court further desires to put on record their appreciation of the prompt action of the United States life-saving crew at Hammond in having the lifeboat alongside in the heavy surf, and the help given by the captain of the boat when ashore; also of the action of the commander, Col. Walker, U.S.A., and his officers and men, of Fort Stevens for their attention to the wants of the wet and hungry men when at the Fort. And lastly, the Vice-Consul desires to express his satisfaction with the quiet and orderly behaviour of the crew when in Astoria.

Given under our hands at the British Vice-Consulate at Astoria, Oregon, on the thirteenth day of November, A.D. 1906.

P. L. CHERRY, British Vice-Consul, President of Court.

D. WILLIAMS, Master, Barque" Robert Duncan."

ROBT. MOORE, Master, Barque "Bankburn."

N. D. JOHNSON, Clerk of the Court."

(Issued in London by, the Board of Trade on the 24th day of December, 1906.)


The Peter Iredale was a four-masted steel barque sailing vessel that ran ashore October 25, 1906, on the Oregon coast en route to the Columbia River. It was abandoned on Clatsop Spit near Fort Stevens in Warrenton about four miles (6 km) south of the Columbia River channel. Wreckage is still visible, making it a popular tourist attraction as one of the most accessible shipwrecks of the Graveyard of the Pacific.

The ship was named after Peter Iredale, who not only owned the vessel as part of his shipping fleet, but was also a well known figure in Liverpool, England, where his business was headquartered.

The ship was built in Maryport in June 1890, by R. Ritson & Co Ltd for P. Iredale & Porter. It weighed 2,075 tons and measured 87 meters (285 feet) in length and was fashioned from steel plates on an iron frame. It had royal sails above double top and topgallant sails, and was the largest vessel built by Ritson. The ship was originally commanded by Captain G.A. Brown and later by Captain H. Lawrence.

Sailing from Salina Cruz, Mexico, on or about September 26, 1906, the Peter Iredale was bound for Portland, Oregon with 1,000 tons of ballast and a crew of 27, including two stowaways. The voyage up the coast was unremarkable until the night of October 25, when Captain H. Lawrence sighted the Tillamook Rock Lighthouse at 3:20 a.m. local time. The crew altered course first east-northeast and then northeast to enter the mouth of the Columbia River in thick mist and a rising tide. Under strong winds out of the west, an attempt was made to wear the ship away from shore, but a heavy northwest squall grounded the Peter Iredale on Clatsop Sands (now called Clatsop Spit). High seas and wind drove the ship ashore. A lifeboat was dispatched from Hammond, Oregon and assisted in evacuating the sailors, who were tended to at Fort Stevens. No casualties occurred in the accident.

A Naval Court inquiry was held in Astoria on November 12 and 13, 1906, by the British Vice-Consulate to determine the cause of the wreck. After investigating, no blame was placed on Lawrence and the crew for the loss, and he and his officers were commended for their attempts to save the ship.

There was little damage to the hull and plans were made to tow the ship back to sea, but after several weeks waiting for favorable weather and ocean conditions, the ship had listed to the right and become embedded in the sands.

Captain Lawrence's final toast to his ship was: "May God bless you, and may your bones bleach in the sands."[1]


Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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5/2/08 3:56 A

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Our miles posted have taken us to Fort Stevens and the South Jetty.

Fort Stevens was a coastal defense fort and saw active service from the Civil War days to the end of World War II.

Fort Stevens State Park, in addition to excellent camping and RV facilities, has many interesting artifacts from its fort days that continue to intrigue visitors.

Examples are the reconstruction of the Civil War earthworks - still in progress: Battery Russell, the gun battery in the line of fire from a Japanese submarine during World War II, and the near-by Pacific Rim Peace Memorial: Battery Mishler, a one of a kind battery and the underground command post for the Columbia River forts



Edited by: BKP4166 at: 5/2/2008 (03:58)
Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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5/2/08 3:49 A

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A little more about Astoria...

The Astoria Column is a tower overlooking the mouth of the Columbia River on Coxcomb Hill in the city of Astoria in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is part of a 30-acre park.

The 125-foot-tall column was built in 1926 with financing by the Great Northern Railroad and Vincent Astor, the great-grandson of John Jacob Astor, in commemoration of the city's role in the family's business history. It stands atop 700-foot-tall Coxcomb Hill and includes an interior spiral staircase that leads to an observation deck at the top.[1] The Column was dedicated on July 22, 1926.[1]

The spiral sgrafitto frieze on the exterior of the structure is almost seven feet wide, and 525 feet long[1]. Painted by Electus D. Litchfield and Attilio Pusterla, the mural show 14 significant events in the early history of Oregon with a focus on Astoria’s role including Captain Gray’s discovery of the Columbia River in 1792 and the Lewis & Clark Expedition[1]. In 1974 the column was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The murals that make up the column were refurbished in 1995 and a granite plaza was added in 2004.

A plaque at the site commemorates the first Community Antenna Television (CATV) System in the United States built in 1949 by local resident Leroy E. "Ed" Parsons; twin-lead transmission wires redistributed the signal of KRSC-TV (now KING-TV) in Seattle, Washington to area homes. Former Astoria resident Byron Roman was also involved in early cable invention and distribution


Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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4/29/08 12:30 P

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Kathy, we have been to Astoria and visited a number of these places. Isn't the Colunm really something to see? We have pictures of it and Fort Stevens and went through the Maritime Museum too.

It's Only Temporary

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Water is very important for us. We may, and I do, require more than the 8 glasses a day. The link goes to a water calculator I use to see what I need for my current weight. Mt requirement has dropped 9 ounces due to weight loss. Yipee!
fitnessgear101.com/fitness-calculato
rs/water-requirement-caculators.aspx


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4/29/08 5:30 A

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We will start in Astoria and go Northwest to the South Jetty Fort Stevens.

Astoria is for explorers! As the oldest American settlement west of the Rockies, Astoria offers a rich history for your exploration. It was first visited by Captain Robert Gray in 1792, by the Lewis & Clark Corps of Discovery in 1805, then adventuresome pioneers by the thousands. Now its your turn to experience the excitement of exploring Astoria.

Within a 20 mile radius, one can see dozens of exciting attractions including Fort Stevens State Park, Fort Astoria, Heritage Center Museum, Flavel House Museum, Uppertown Fire Fighters Museum, Astoria Column, and the Columbia River Maritime Museum, home to one of the nation's finest displays of model ships and nautical artifacts.

Astoria offers other fun discoveries, such as historic Victorian homes, the beautiful 4.1 mile long Astoria Bridge, cruise ships, and fishing charters offering the thrill of landing your own salmon, sturgeon, or crab.

A walk to explore the city's waterfront should include stops at the 6th Street Viewing Dock, the 14th Street Riverpark with its interpretive panels of river activity, and the 17th Street Pier where there's a chance to tour visiting ships. Ride the 1913 trolley that runs beside the Riverwalk and discover the bustling business district with its many unique shops and galleries.

For the kids, there's nothing like a trip to the Uppertown Firefighters Museum at 30th and Marine Drive. It is full of fire fighting memorabilia from 1877 to 1963. The collection includes motorized, hand-pulled and horse-drawn fire engines, as well as a large photographic collection of some of Astoria's spectacular fires. The Astoria Children's Museum is located on the second floor, and offers interactive and educational play experiences for children.

Astoria celebrates its Scandinavian heritage with the Scandinavian Midsummer Festival, held in mid-June. Local Icelanders, Finns, Danes, Norwegians and Swedes join together to celebrate their heritage. Come celebrate and enjoy the costumed local townspeople dance the midsummer pole dance, see the bonfire burn to destroy evil spirits, and the tugs-of-war pitting Scandinavian nationalities against each other. The festival features authentic Scandinavian musicians, a smorgasbord of old world delicacies, ethnic entertainment, dancing, crafts and a parade.


Kathy from Oregon

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It's foolish to ask God to direct your steps, if you aren't willing to move your feet.


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