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LARABY34's Photo LARABY34 SparkPoints: (49,114)
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3/13/14 2:46 A

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It depends on the hikes you want to do, but I'm next to the Sierras and like to stay out for a while so I would highly recommend lunges and squats. I know that it will sound strange, but squatting while gardening is an excellent prep for weighted climbs. As for the actual hikes, even they are not "grand" on paper get out there and do them because it is a great way to be in the moment with your body and I have never regretted a moment of it!

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KAYOTIC's Photo KAYOTIC Posts: 12,909
2/20/14 9:26 P

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You've got some great tips there! You can do a C25K type plan and just walk it, to increase your endurance. For variety, you can also do interval type workouts on the treadmill where you would increase the speed or incline for 30 -60 seconds at a time. This makes it more interesting and keeps your focus.

Lunges are also a good ST for hiking, you can add instability as you get better at the movement. Also step-ups.

highest weight ever:202, SP starting weight: 143

New goal: more practical new goal, 129, update ticker to reflect that goal.

H: 5''4" 50 y.o.

"Don''t let yesterday use up too much of today." Will Rogers

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WRITEAWAY's Photo WRITEAWAY SparkPoints: (42,896)
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2/19/14 2:05 P

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I can do this plan!

Thank you so much!!

This is specific and attainable and meets me where I'm at.

THANK YOU~!

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--Anna

"There's so much beauty around us, but just two eyes to see // Everywhere I go, I'm looking." -- Rich Mullins


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MOTIVATED@LAST's Photo MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,289
2/18/14 4:51 P

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Fair enough - exercise should be something you enjoy. And if running ain't your thing, don't push it.

Don't bother about swimming or the elliptical (not that they aren't great forms of exercise - just that your training should be as similar to the event you are aiming at as possible, and swimming doesn't really prepare your legs for hiking).

The treadmill is good. Start with it on the level, and trying to find your maximum natural walking speed (ie. the point at which you COULD walk faster, but it would no longer feel a comfortable or natural rhythm. It varies from person to person, but for most people is around 3-4 mph.

Do the treadmill for 30-60 mins an hour, 3 times per week. Add 1% to the incline each week (each 1% is roughly 10% more challenging, so after 10 weeks you would be working twice as hard as when you started). If you have trouble maintaining this maximum natural walking speed as you increase the incline, drop it back to where you can maintain that speed, and repeat a week. If you can get to 15% incline over 3-4 months, you would actually be pretty fit.

And as before, try and get out on a real trail once per week or so, carrying the same amount of gear as you would for a 46'er. Aim to increase the distance over time, say from 6 miles/2-3 hours, out to about 16 miles (5-8 hours).

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.


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WRITEAWAY's Photo WRITEAWAY SparkPoints: (42,896)
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2/18/14 1:30 P

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This helps a lot.


I'm....not a runner. (um....I have...big, um, well, boobs.) And I hate running---it's one of the exercises I feel depressed or even downright scared doing. When I *ran* as a teen, it was the literal fight or flight (from the house, while a fight was going on). Sorry for TMI. Running isn't going to be something I'm going to ever work with.

How about treadmill, walking, elliptical, swimming....how do all of these fit into training for longer and more intense hikes~?


What are good short and mid-term goals?

I'm at, say, "1" if "10" is hiking the high peaks.


How do I get from here to there, Suessian-style or not?

--Anna

"There's so much beauty around us, but just two eyes to see // Everywhere I go, I'm looking." -- Rich Mullins


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MOTIVATED@LAST's Photo MOTIVATED@LAST Posts: 14,289
2/18/14 1:59 A

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The best training for hiking .... is hiking.

Unfortunately, it is not always realistic to go hiking several days a week, so an alternate plan is needed.

But aim to go hiking once each weekend (weather permitting). Perhaps find a park within reasonable reach, with decent hill. Aim to slightly improve your time to the top each week you walk there.

As for the rest of the week, funny you should mention C25K, as this is probably one of the best ways to train for hiking in the minimum of time. Running will build your cardio fitness, and also develop the leg muscles. Once you are running continuously comfortably, work on reducing your 5K time. 3 days per week.

Add some strength training 2 or 3 days per week. 3 key moves for hikers are"
* calf raises for ankle strength and avoiding rollovers. Do them barefoot for a less stable platform that works your muscles harder. Work up to single leg calf raises.
* squats for leg strength to power up hills
* planks to build core and back strength to carry a pack.

M@L

The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man.


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WRITEAWAY's Photo WRITEAWAY SparkPoints: (42,896)
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2/17/14 6:05 P

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Sooooo....there are so many people (not just in SparkPeople) who do "Couch to 5k" training.

I want to know how to train to do the 46 Adirondack High Peaks, Summer and Winter. People around here say to start by working on the Catskill 35 (obviously summer).

I'm the kind of person who throws myself into two to four intense hours of activity at the YMCA and then I crash for a few days. I *expect* myself to be READY for an "A1A" ADK hike next week, when I'm in pain from just snowshoeing for an hour and a half today.


What's a good pacing plan?

Attainable goals...???

HELP!
(THANKS!!)

--Anna

"There's so much beauty around us, but just two eyes to see // Everywhere I go, I'm looking." -- Rich Mullins


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