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CK9876 SparkPoints: (1,826)
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7/8/12 7:07 P

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Ah, great. We also used sign language with our kids when they were little, so they could come up with nice ways to ask for what they want. Even the simpler requests such as "more food please" or "that toy, not this one" or "tired" or "drink" really helps reduce their frustration. Yes, anytime you can understand the cause of the misbehavior, and come up with a way to prevent the cause from occurring, it can be helpful. Best wishes! CK

TURNERHEATHER4's Photo TURNERHEATHER4 SparkPoints: (14,078)
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7/7/12 11:19 P

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Thanks for the advice! We started sign language and it's helping so far...also, he is only 1 so it is hard to get him to sit in time out right now.

****Heather Turner****

"Be the change you want to see in the world"

"No matter how slow your progress is, you are still lapping everyone sitting on the couch"

"If you won't take care of you, who will?"

"I will do what I need to do, in order to do what I want to do."


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CK9876 SparkPoints: (1,826)
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7/6/12 8:52 A

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My kids went through those stages. And sometimes they recur.
Do you have a consistent time-out place (ours is the front door entryway since there's nothing to grab)? If you are consistent with the time-outs (1 minute per year of age) for EVERY time they do the same misbehavior, it should discourage it. My 5 year old went in a time-out for hitting his brother, and then he proceeded to hit me repeatedly as I was putting him in time-out. I explained that he would be there for 5 minutes and I'd add one minute for each time he hurt from that point onward, and for each time he leaves time out. I reminded him that leaving time-out restarts the timer. He hit 3 more times and left time-out twice. So he had to restart an 8-minute time-out and I walked away. He stayed and completed it and didn't hit again that day. Also, be patient since kids sometimes take repeating a negative behavior 100 times (sometimes 100 ways to test the boundaries) before the do the positive behavior.
Star charts also work. 1 sticker per day without hitting, for example. Get 10 stars and you get a fun activity with the parent of your choice, such as going to the playground of the kids choice, playing a board game or a T-ball game they like, etc (not food).
Also, my oldest son went through these stages and we later learned that he is a sensory seeker and needs to feel pressure (carrots, jumping jacks, bear hugs)/ touch textures (velcro, beads)/ taste strong flavors (lemon juice, salsa, green onions), etc.
Hope this helps. CK

ERICAKAY12 SparkPoints: (6,558)
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7/3/12 12:21 P

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when my son was in that stage and he bit me I bit him back and he never did it again. he pulls my hair I pull his hair and then he stops. some times if they fell it they wont do it again. I tell him if he bits me I will bit him back and then he don't do it.

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LADYHAWK1985's Photo LADYHAWK1985 SparkPoints: (1,257)
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6/30/12 9:54 P

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I would find a punishment that works and be consistent with it like if they spit sit them on the couch and say no spitting, or reward them for not spitting like say you have been very good today and haven't spit at all I am proud of you and give them a special treat (something small) but consistency is important and letting them know why they are being punished or rewarded is also another biggie. Children at that age need to know why they get a treat or in trouble because they may not realize what they did and punishment should be immediate, hope it works out for you, emoticon

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6/22/12 11:47 A

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I would just keep telling them not to do that, it's not nice, be gentle and give them something they can bite, hit and pull when they feel the need to do that. Maybe a stuffed animal? Also, praise them when they don't do any of those actions. I didn't have this issue but I think it will take a lot of positive reinforcement, consistency, and time. Good Luck!

Jenni

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BRETTA467's Photo BRETTA467 Posts: 705
6/19/12 11:41 P

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Sorry, I can not offer you advice on this one, good luck!

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TURNERHEATHER4's Photo TURNERHEATHER4 SparkPoints: (14,078)
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6/19/12 10:18 P

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I have a little one that is almost 2 that is in a bitting, hitting and pulling hair stage all at once! Although I have four kids we've never gone through this! Can you please give me some advice? TIA.

****Heather Turner****

"Be the change you want to see in the world"

"No matter how slow your progress is, you are still lapping everyone sitting on the couch"

"If you won't take care of you, who will?"

"I will do what I need to do, in order to do what I want to do."


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