Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
1/1/13 3:31 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
emoticon

A 2013 Ask the expert is now available. Please post your questions on that board.

SLIMCHANCE5's Photo SLIMCHANCE5 Posts: 2,691
12/3/12 4:11 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks - dont really think its slugs or snails though - I live in the desert and have never seen any here.! Will try the board trick though!! And think I will get some of the diatomaceous earth - that stuff is good for so many things!!

"To bring anything into your life, imagine that it's already there"
Richard Bach

I try to be mindful of all of the beautiful things that God sends my way - sunrise, sunsets, birds, bunnies, flowers, friends and strangers and family!

'Life isn't about how to survive the storm,
But how to dance in the rain.'

'Friends are angels who lift us to our feet when our wings have trouble remembering how to fly.'
•*´¨ ) ¸.•*¨) -:¦:-♥
(¸.•´(¸ ;.•Shirley•*¨)
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
12/3/12 4:05 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
If you have looked for what might be eating your spinach during the day and have seen nothing, there is a good chance that it may be slugs or snails. They are usually around more after dark. If you want to check for them, you could lay a board on the ground near your spinach and check under it in the morning, and you may find them hiding under it. To treat the problem, I usually use egg shells that I crush up and sprinkle around the the plants they like. You can also use diatomaceous earth which you can get at most good garden centers.

SLIMCHANCE5's Photo SLIMCHANCE5 Posts: 2,691
12/3/12 11:19 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I need help from the EXPERT-something is eating on my your spinach leaves - I have looked over the plants completely and dont see anything on there - any ideas?

"To bring anything into your life, imagine that it's already there"
Richard Bach

I try to be mindful of all of the beautiful things that God sends my way - sunrise, sunsets, birds, bunnies, flowers, friends and strangers and family!

'Life isn't about how to survive the storm,
But how to dance in the rain.'

'Friends are angels who lift us to our feet when our wings have trouble remembering how to fly.'
•*´¨ ) ¸.•*¨) -:¦:-♥
(¸.•´(¸ ;.•Shirley•*¨)
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
11/11/12 8:57 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
That will depend on how big the maple trees is. If it is still small ( 1-2 ft) you can probably dig it out with a hand trowel with out doing to much damage to the roots of your rose bush. Mush bigger than that, the trees root system may be big enough that it would be too intertwined with the rose bush that you could easily damage the root systems of both of them.
The sooner you get it out the better for both plants.

NFGFANIAM's Photo NFGFANIAM SparkPoints: (29,220)
Fitness Minutes: (19,736)
Posts: 1,038
11/11/12 8:23 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
There is a maple tree that has started to grow in my flower garden. Currently we have Mums, Roses, Shasta Daiseys, Coneflower, Black Eyed Susans, and a variety of ground cover. The tree started to bloom right smack dab next to my rose bush. Will I jeapordize the rose bush If I dig the tree up and plant it elsewhere in the yard?

Reduce - Reuse - Recycle
Starting Weight 6/10 - 280
Long Term Goal Weight - 8/13 - 140


 Pounds lost: 0.0 
 
0
22.25
44.5
66.75
89
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
11/9/12 1:52 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Your welcome and good luck.

LOVENHEALTH's Photo LOVENHEALTH SparkPoints: (4,753)
Fitness Minutes: (619)
Posts: 101
11/9/12 11:25 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for the tips. Avoiding chemicals as we have outdoor cats and a bunch of kids that play in the area. I think I am dreading cats claw more than the honeysuckle but that's waiting another year :)

 current weight: 218.4 
 
245
221.25
197.5
173.75
150
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
11/9/12 10:40 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Any place honeysuckle touches the ground it can and usualy does take root, so if you are going to grow it, it needs to be well trellised.
I had a problem with it when I moved into this house. Since I grow organicly, what I did was soak the ground, then pull/dig up the roots. I have had to do it repeatedly and still occasionally find a spot where it tries to come back, this may be due to reseeding since a lot it grows wild around me. I continue to pull it up but do have other plantings in the area now.

If you choose to use chemicals to control it, instead of spraying the herbicide on, paint it on. That makes it easier to control exactly where the chemicals go, so that you will be less apt to damage existing plants. Be careful what you use to kill it with if you are going to grow vegetables in the area. Generally, organic farmers say 3 years chemical free before an area can be considered organic.

LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
11/9/12 8:13 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Honeysuckle is pretty invasive---think you will find that you will be doing this for a while---but keep plugging away at what you are doing. Hopefully our expert might have some other ideas for you.

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
LOVENHEALTH's Photo LOVENHEALTH SparkPoints: (4,753)
Fitness Minutes: (619)
Posts: 101
11/8/12 10:01 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I have a honeysuckle plant that wandered freely for about 8 years. It has taken root in many spots across the front of my house where it had grown and I was wondering what is the best way to get these roots out to ensure the plant doesn't come back? I have spent 5 hours already pulling dead vines and have a couple more hours before I am finished. I am also trying to preserve the other plants that are near it which vary in types, wandering jew, asparagus fern, juniper bush, bougainvillea and a yucca plant. I am hoping to make this area I am cleaning into a small garden with some vegetables and flowers in another area come spring so open to suggestions on what would be good to plant in the Mesa area of Arizona. Thanks for any tips.

 current weight: 218.4 
 
245
221.25
197.5
173.75
150
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
10/26/12 5:53 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hope you have better luck next year---such a shame to have fruit trees if they are not going to produce.

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
NUDAY4DEB's Photo NUDAY4DEB Posts: 3,735
10/25/12 10:36 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
SharJoPaul,
Thank you for the info. Last winter was unusual for us as we have alot of snow and ice usually. We tend to be quite cold and windy, any where from below zero to the 30's usually.
I will check with the nursery I bought the trees from. I hope next year will be fruitful.

Debbie in Masschusetts

Debbie
Florida, MA


 current weight: 194.4 
 
197.4
181.8
166.2
150.6
135
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
10/22/12 2:53 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
NUDAY4DEB
My first guess would be that you may have had frosts after the buds have begun to grow and before they opened. Many fruit trees have an early bloomtime and are very susseptable to late frosts. Also, most fruit trees need a certain number of chill hours (varies with the type of tree) before they with bloom. Chill hours are the amount of time during the winter below 40 degrees. You might check the requirements of they types of trees you have to see if eaither of these are the case.

NUDAY4DEB's Photo NUDAY4DEB Posts: 3,735
10/22/12 9:53 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Most of my trees don't blossum. I had one year where my Bartlett Pear Tree blossumed but the Bosc Pear never has and it is heading for 8 years old next year. They look healthy and have grown. I usually leave all the dandelions growing in the yard until after any blossums are off trees. My thoughts are the bees would come to the trees that way?
I have gotten Peaches from my tree and a few nectarines and they are in the same area.
My honeycrisp apple tree is huge but never a blossum.

Debbie

Debbie
Florida, MA


 current weight: 194.4 
 
197.4
181.8
166.2
150.6
135
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
10/22/12 9:41 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Do you have flowers? or that bees that do the pollination for you?

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
NUDAY4DEB's Photo NUDAY4DEB Posts: 3,735
10/22/12 9:32 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hi SharJoPaul,
I was wondering if there is something I should be doing in the Fall to ensure that my apple, pear and cherry trees get blossums and fruit the following year. I keep waiting but no pears, cherries yet and most of my apple trees (honeycrisp, Braeburn, yellow delicious) don't get apples or blossums. I had four apples this year on my Macintosh tree but nothing else. The trees are 5, 6 and 7 years old. Maybe too soon for fruit? My plum tree is 4 years old but no flowers or fruit there either.

I do cut off branches in the Fall that are too low but don't know how to prune them so maybe that is my problem. I am in Zone 4 due to the mountains I live in.
I also have a huge kiwi vine with one male kiwi. The female kiwi vine is huge. It's an Artic Beauty and no blossums or fruit on that one either. I must be doing something wrong.
Thank you for any ideas you can give me.

Debbie in Massachusetts

Edited by: NUDAY4DEB at: 10/22/2012 (09:35)
Debbie
Florida, MA


 current weight: 194.4 
 
197.4
181.8
166.2
150.6
135
WANTSZU's Photo WANTSZU Posts: 6,316
10/20/12 12:52 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thank you, I will wait til spring. One less thing to do in the garden before we leave for AZ.

 Pounds lost: 27.0 
 
0
14
28
42
56
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
10/19/12 9:11 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Sage plants are usually pruned int the early spring.

WANTSZU's Photo WANTSZU Posts: 6,316
10/18/12 12:16 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I have some purple sage plants which are done blooming for the season. My question is: Should I cut the plants back this fall or should I wait to spring to cut them back? Because it usually gets very cold and snows quite a bit would it be better to wait? I have put leaf mulch around them already.

 Pounds lost: 27.0 
 
0
14
28
42
56
KAKT0610 Posts: 27
8/11/12 5:06 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks, I will try the vinegar. I would rather not use chemicals at all either, but as a last resort. Like hospitals and medicine too :) If we are able to buy this house we are in, oh boy, I have such grand dreams for this yard! I think I want to get those stumps ripped out eventually :) along with all of their roots.

 current weight: 195.5 
 
197
187.75
178.5
169.25
160
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
8/10/12 6:11 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks---they would probably resprout---LOL---but I think they look nice---and dh has trimmed them back so that my son will have better access behind this year for Christmas---that is what they don't like---LOL---gets in the way for decorations

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
8/10/12 6:07 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I can't tell from the picture what type of bushes they are. You do need to be aware that many types of bushes will resprout even if cut back to the ground. so cutting them off and raising the soil line probably won't kill them all. There are things that you can paint on the stumps that are supposed to keep them from resprouting, I dno't know how well they work. Since you are considering raising the soil level over the top of the remaining stumps you could also just keep a good eye out for and regrowth and prune that off at or below ground level. After a while the roots will die and the bushes will quit sending up new shoots but that could take a few years. You could also dig down around the stumps and chop most of them out, that would probably speed up the process of killing off the root system.

Wether the roots grow under the basement wall probably depends on how far down the wall goes into the ground and what type of bushes they are. It you have good access to that area of the basement, you could dig down & see if there are roots there.

LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
8/10/12 5:44 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Sharjo---I have a question on bushes---we have bushes in front of our porch--they are actually in good shape---although dh does need to trim them---LOL--but he and my son hate them---they have been here a long time and I am afraid to have them pull them up---which would take a rope being put on them and pulling them out---but I am afraid their root system probably goes under the basement which extends under the porch and is a dirt floor---what do you think of this? or could we just cut them down to the ground and then I plant around them---I would of course build up the dirt there and have raised beds so most of the stumps would eventually be under dirt. Just want your take on it---actually, there is a picture of my house on my page from when we were looking at houses and you can see how nice the bushes are.

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
8/10/12 11:54 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
KAKT0610
I am assumig that what you have growing in the area is probably perrenial since from what you have said the plants came in on their own. Covering it with weed cloth (even multiple layers of weed cloth) will probably not kill off the vines. Vinegar with 1/2 - 1 cup of salt added sprayed on many broadleafed weeds/plants can kill them, you will sometimes have to spray them 2-3 times. This works best on hot sunny days. The vinigar/salt even works on some grasses. If that does not work, you may have to resiort to chemical warfare (I use organic methods, so excuse my prejudgdice against chemicals) There are a number of strong man made chemicals out there that you can use that will kill about anything.
As to the stumps, it depends on their condition, if they are dead (no growth showing) and showing signs of rotting away, you might want to just let them rot. The rotting process can be encourage by drilling holes in the stumps, if they are big enough and adding high nitrogen fertilizer to the holes and moistening it. Stump grinders can be rented but be sure you understand how to use it. Or you can hire someone to either grind them out or dig/pull them out.

LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
8/10/12 7:47 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Vines are so difficult to control---hopefully Sharjo will have an idea on that one as we have a few in our back area---but I make my dh deal with them---LOL

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
KAKT0610 Posts: 27
8/9/12 7:48 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I'm not sure yet what to plant in my little 17X3 space next year, but I would really like to clear it out for real after all of the flowers are done. We rent our house so I'm not sure what was in the space before, but back in the spring I was pullung these roots out FOREVER! I just stopped after 2 days because there is a tree there and I didn't want to hack at it's roots. There are two stumps from what I'm guessing were bushes a long time ago. How can I get these out? Do I need to call a professional to get them out? I also have some kind of vines that come out that have thorns too. I got poked a couple of times weeding. I was thinking would it help if I get some of that weeding cloth to just smother them before I plant next year. I'm in SC so it will still be warm for a while and they are gonna keep on coming out!

 current weight: 195.5 
 
197
187.75
178.5
169.25
160
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
8/6/12 9:02 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
IMREITEr vine could be a number of things. r best chance at identification would be to take a sample of if to your local University Extension or Master Gardener office or a good local nursery. Cut a piece 1 to 2 feet long that has leaves and if possible and tendrils or what ever it uses to cling to what it grows on, put it in a zip loc bag to eep it as fresh as possible. Even if it is a grape vine, if it doesn't produce fruit and it is covering and killing trees you will probably want to get rid of it. Once it is identified you can get advise on how best to get rid of it.

IMREITE's Photo IMREITE SparkPoints: (244,960)
Fitness Minutes: (219,684)
Posts: 12,239
8/6/12 1:06 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I am in Wisconsin- Zone 5. I have what looks like a grape fine. The base shoot is as about 2 inches thick . in the last 3 years i have never seen it produce any flowers or fruits.
The vines climb up around several trees. it has already killed a couple pine trees.

Any idea what it could be?

Don't forget to be awesome.


 current weight: 241.8 
 
241.8
223.85
205.9
187.95
170
SOMOMOM's Photo SOMOMOM Posts: 164
8/2/12 11:24 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
My ginger plant is growing! It's almost a foot tall and has 2 leaves coming out at the top. I guess the drought has done it well... ha

 current weight: 188.0 
 
264
226.5
189
151.5
114
NANCY_ICANDOIT's Photo NANCY_ICANDOIT SparkPoints: (59,735)
Fitness Minutes: (34,409)
Posts: 12,591
7/18/12 6:51 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
GOOD LUCK BOB AND BE SURE TO LET US KNOW WHEN YOU WIN emoticon

LOCATION,, QUEBEC, CANADA

Nancy-


 current weight: 204.0 
 
220
213.75
207.5
201.25
195
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
7/18/12 2:39 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Sounds like the war has just begun---LOL

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/18/12 12:39 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I hope these things will work. My thinking is that by both starving the roots and making the soil environment inhospitible for the plant on a regular basis it will probably over time die out.

Once you get rid of it, since the soil will already be acidic, you could plant some blueberry bushes there and have some great fruit.

POPEYETHETURTLE's Photo POPEYETHETURTLE SparkPoints: (218,041)
Fitness Minutes: (93,113)
Posts: 14,062
7/18/12 12:30 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thank you both for the help.

Looking up dry ice, I found that when it sublimates that it is slightly acidic, so that compliment the increase of an acidic PH. Since I have tried acid and it has been somewhat useful on a one time basis, I will check the soil PH and go back out to do battle.

It's been a war of hit and miss, and now I'm going to "Tora, Tora, Tora" on a bi-weekly or monthly basis. I now have hope of winning this war!

"A government big enough to give everything you want is also big enough to take everything you have."
-Ronald Reagan

Co-Founder, Dealing with Depression; www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_individual.asp?gid=953

Co-leader, Conservatives/Republicans sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_indiv
idual.asp?gid=4683


Co-leader, Writers www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=50375


 
218,041 SparkPoints
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/18/12 11:45 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
POPEYE
It sounds like you have a permanent "enemy". You may have been on the right track with the sulfuric acid and nitric acid since century plants like a near nuetral soil. The trouble is that the soil in our area ( I live near KC also) tends to have a lot of lime in it )especially the subsoil) due to all the lime stone in the area, so you may have brought the soil PH back up to a more neutral level.
Now for possible solutions.
First check the soil PH. You can pick up a PH meter, usually for under $10 at most good garden centers. The soil does need to be moist when you test it, sp with this drought going on you will probably have to water it, then test its PH.
Since Century Plants like a PH between 6.1 & 7.8, if you can get the soil well outside that limit, it will discourage the plants growth.
Vinegar is a quick way to lower soil PH. It has a short term effect so would have to be repeated a number of times, but could quickly pring the PH down to a level the plant would have to struggle to survive in. Combine that with continual removing any plant growth, take out any leaves that appear and the roots a few inches deep, which will deprive the roots of anything to live on (nutrients from photosynthesis) the roots will eventually weaken and die. This may take some time, a year or two, but if you keep adding the vinegar and removing any sign of growth at least monthly the roots will eventually die.

Before planting anything else there you will want to check the PH level and be sure it is back in the average range.

LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
7/18/12 8:15 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
POPEYE, I went and read up on them----have you tried some dry ice or anything like that--read that they are killed by cold---not use what it would do to ground though---hopefully Sharjo could have some ideas for you---thanks for moving it here!

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
POPEYETHETURTLE's Photo POPEYETHETURTLE SparkPoints: (218,041)
Fitness Minutes: (93,113)
Posts: 14,062
7/17/12 5:02 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Re-posted from an incorrect location.


We moved into our current home 12 years ago, and one of the reasons we bought this home is that previous owner(s) had made flower gardens on the east side of the house, plus the north and south sides of the house back to the fence, which was at the very rear of the house. The back yard was similarly gardened and had a Rose of Sharon that was about 4 feet tall.

One of the things that gave the house curb appeal was a very large Century plant growing on the southeast corner - in full bloom.

The next spring, we removed some plants from the back yard and added some Stella D'Oros and a few other things. I trimmed the Rose of Sharon back 1/3 and fed it. It bloomed very heavily and grew more than a foot past where it had been the year before.

In the front and on the sides of the house, we were happy with the look, and except for pruning some plants and feeding each of them a little, we did nothing.

The next spring, my wife decided she wanted to replace the Century plant with something that was bright and bloomed as long into the fall as possible, so I went out to dig it up - noticed there were now Two Century plants. I dug down about 18 inches and cut the roots (I had no idea how deep their roots would go).

It was early summer before we got back to plant (I can't remember the name) my DW's bush. As I added mulch and compost, I hit Century Plant roots at about 4 inches deep. Puzzled, I helped my wife plant her nice blooming plant in another location and went back to work on killing the Century Plant. Digging back down to about one foot, I pretty much soaked it in Round-up. Three weeks later I went back, expecting to find a dead plant.

Surprise! Not only was it not dead, but the top was at ground level.

This time, I cut the thing back to under the 12 inches into the ground and doused them with Brush killer.. Now into the summer, I went back and it looked as if I had fertilized them. The plant was back to ground level. Those stupid plants were making me angry, so I cut them back again and poured sulfuric acid two inches over the top of the things.

One thing led to another in our garden, so it wasn't until fall that I made it back to the Century plant. Just peaking above ground I could see the leaves of both plants. Suffering from Garden frustration, I dug town four feet (really hard work in a mostly clay soil and below the foundation of my house), and poured a gallon of Nitric acid over the roots and filled the hole back in.

That was three years ago. I wanted to plant another Rose of Sharon (you can visit my Spark Page and see how my first one is doing). Lo and behold, those two plants were again above ground, about 6 inches tall. I cut them off at the ground and put stump killer on them. I had tried every trick I knew to kill these blasted plants and they have just kept coming back.

Doing some research, I found that man had eradicated the only know insect that could kill these plants.

I went to my county extension agent last week, explained my problem and asked him what else I could do.

His answer was not the least bit comforting.

He said, "Move. And to be on the safe side, don't take any of the shovels you've used in your efforts to kill the plant. Burn them, and any gloves that you worked with on them. Sprinkle gas over them and burn them. Pour acid over the metal, wrap them in paper and put them in your trash. You'll never kill them and whatever you plant there will be crowded out even if you can auger out the holes 6' deep and fill the holes with acid. It might take a couple of years, but they'll just come back."

I have been in sort of a gardening stupor since then and have come to the place where there are a large number of gardeners.

I am out close to the Sports Complex in a suburb of Kansas City.

At this point, I'm thinking maybe we should move, but somehow that seems like cowardice to me.

Or, maybe, I should take Kenny Rogers advice and "Know when to fold 'em".


"A government big enough to give everything you want is also big enough to take everything you have."
-Ronald Reagan

Co-Founder, Dealing with Depression; www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_individual.asp?gid=953

Co-leader, Conservatives/Republicans sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_indiv
idual.asp?gid=4683


Co-leader, Writers www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=50375


 
218,041 SparkPoints
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/16/12 3:46 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
BBREEZES
Here are a couple of links about why tomato leaves turn yellow.

www.gardeningknowhow.com/vegetable/y
el
low-tomato-leaves.htm


www.veggiegardener.com/yellowing-lea
ve
s-on-tomatoes/


BBREEZES's Photo BBREEZES Posts: 129
7/15/12 9:12 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
We've. Had a bunch of triple. Digit temperatures. And no rain. I insulate my pots and water a good haloing to 2 a day in very large pots with good drainage. I have deep saucers. Underneath. They Re empty by the nexttime I water and the soil is just drying out.

All my pots be shade about 30% of the day and thrived since April.

Just now yellowing

Edited by: BBREEZES at: 7/15/2012 (21:16)
 Pounds lost: 11.0 
 
0
12.5
25
37.5
50
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/15/12 11:00 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
CHELLYNOBELL
Putting chicken wire around your plot and burying the bottom a few niches into the ground should keep rabbits out. You can make a spray by grinding up a jalapeno pepper in the blender with water then letting it steep for a couple of hours. Strain it and put into a spray bottle. (Don't let it steep in the blender jar, it can discolor the jar and seep into thew plastic and flavor things you later use the blender to mix.)

You will need to spray it at least once a week and after rain or watering.

SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/15/12 10:54 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
BBREEZES
If the weather you are having is anything like what we have had here near Kansas City, I totally understand the problem. Even in my raised beds I have to water daily.

If you have checked for any signs of disease and haven't found any, then you might try either moving to pots to where they get some shade in the hottest part of the day or putting up some shade cloth to protect them. It is likely that the intense heat, dry conditions and possible wind is causing the plants to lose moisture faster than their roots can take it up.

It can take a couple of weeks to see improvement and you will probably see it more in any new growth rather than in the existing leaves.

CHELLYNOBELLY3's Photo CHELLYNOBELLY3 SparkPoints: (1,735)
Fitness Minutes: (954)
Posts: 2
7/15/12 10:33 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I have a plot in my local community garden. The garden is organic, so I can't use any chemicals or pesticides, just organic or visual deterrents. I am having a problem with rabbits that keep getting in and nibbling on green beans, strawberries and, of course, carrots. I am looking for any and all suggestions of how to deter these rabbits without using chemicals, and without having to put something really smelly on the plants that I want to eventually eat.

Thanks!

 current weight: 184.0 
 
193
187.25
181.5
175.75
170
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
7/15/12 9:35 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Do the pots have good drainage?

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
BBREEZES's Photo BBREEZES Posts: 129
7/15/12 9:08 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hi, I'm in Arkansas up on a mountain (rocks) so all my plants are in raised beds or pots. It's. Been Very hot and dry.
my formaly thriving tomato plants (in insulated pots w/big deep saucers ) are turning very yellow.
I've added a little composted cow manure and magnesium.about a week ago, and they get watered adequately regularly; but,no change.

Suggestions????

 Pounds lost: 11.0 
 
0
12.5
25
37.5
50
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
7/14/12 6:55 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Dh is doing a good job of watering---I will try giving them that when I get home on Tuesday---I will be putting in winter pansies there in September so need something to survive til then.

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/13/12 6:00 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
LECATES
I wouldn't give up on them yet. Be sure the plants get a thorough watering anytime the ground is dry to 1 inch deep. They may yet pull out of it. You might also try an application of Superthrive. I'm not sure what is in it, but it has pulled almost dead plants out of what ever was wrong with them.

LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
7/13/12 5:00 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Since I am not home, can't really answer---and no way to rig up shade to some of them----some are getting late day shade--no signs of bugs before I left---maybe did not loosen the root ball enough---but not sure I will try them again.

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/13/12 11:21 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
LECATES
Got some questions for you about your salvia. How long has it been in the ground? How much did you loosen the root ball? Did you check for aphids or other bugs?

I am assuming that the comment about it looking like sticks means it is losing its leaves. As a temporary thing, I would set up some sort of shade for it to help protect it from the heat which will slow down its water loss through the leaves. Also be sure you are watering it deeply so the water gets down to all the roots and soaks the ground around them so they are encourage to spread out.

LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
7/12/12 9:18 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
My dh is telling my my salvia is not doing well---look more like sticks---could it be the heat ? he has been watering them for me and says they are the only things not doing well. I did buy them late and they were root bound when took them out of pots but I did loosen the roots a bit before replanting them.

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/12/12 2:18 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Great!
I hope they do well.

KAKT0610 Posts: 27
7/12/12 2:10 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hey thanks, no problem at all. Yes I found that out as well, I hadn't been on the message board a lot this week. I had them in full sun ALL DAY. Oooops! I moved them under our carport, and it looks like one of them is going to give me two blooms, yay! I hope the rest follow soon.

 current weight: 195.5 
 
197
187.75
178.5
169.25
160
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/10/12 1:38 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
KAKT0610
Sorry it has taken me a while to get back to you, my computer is having problems.
To start with here is a link on growing Nasturtiums that might help

www.almanac.com/plant/nasturtium

They are a cool season flower and tend to go dormant in summer heat, so if you are having the heat wave that many of us are that might be part of the problem.

KAKT0610 Posts: 27
7/10/12 8:35 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
OK thanks!

 current weight: 195.5 
 
197
187.75
178.5
169.25
160
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
7/10/12 7:40 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
KA, Sharjopaul should be on soon to answer your question.

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
LAENINI's Photo LAENINI Posts: 1
7/10/12 3:57 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I love Preen and use it in all of my flower beds each spring to help keep weeds to a minimum. I apply an even layer to the bed, then cover the layer with mulch. I almost never have to spend time weeding. Preen is a natural product, its made from gluten that poisons any seeds that germinate shortly after the seed sprouts. They only drawback is that you cant then use it in flower or garden beds that you are starting from seeds, only use it in established beds, or beds being started by bedding plants.

emoticon
emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon

KAKT0610 Posts: 27
7/8/12 11:29 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hello team, I recently planted Nasturtium from seed and they are doing great except for blooming :( Not a single bloom and it has been two months. Any advice on what I am doing wrong woud be great. I really want to sit them out on my porch when those pretty peaches and cream flowers pop out.

 current weight: 195.5 
 
197
187.75
178.5
169.25
160
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/6/12 11:39 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Ginger likes a rich moist soil so be sure to mix in plenty of compost into the soil you use. They like the soilto stay moist, the compost will help with that. So water them well, untill a LITTLE of the water comes out the holes in the bottom of the pot. Do NOT let them dry out, insert your finger into the soil to about the first joint, if the soil is dry it is time to water. Ginger also prefers light shade/dappled sun, so be sure you set the pots where they are not in full sun condition.

SOMOMOM's Photo SOMOMOM Posts: 164
7/6/12 10:10 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Good morning! My MIL had a piece of ginger sprout -- I was fascinated! I googled it, and put it in a pot with some water. One site says not too much water, more on the dry side but keep it a little moist, and another site says keep it well watered. Does anyone know which works best? I can't wait to see what happens. I have them in pots outside, but will bring them in because we're supposed to be close to 110 this weekend. Steamed ginger, anyone?? emoticon

Edited by: SOMOMOM at: 7/6/2012 (10:11)
 current weight: 188.0 
 
264
226.5
189
151.5
114
BATES291's Photo BATES291 Posts: 143
7/2/12 12:00 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks so much for the information. Something to know for next year. They all went straight to the stalk without any other growth. So I guess I will try again next year. I will let them seed so that I can get the seeds to start over with.

Angela B.
Everett, WA
Midst of a Chrysolis Duo
Flutterwork Duo
Dolvett Quince's Team


FitBit link : www.fitbit.com/user/24BF79

first time around in BLC21
Crimson Butterflies


01/02/13- 224
01/09/13- 226
01/16/13- 220
01/23/13- 222
01/30/13- 216
02/06/13- 215
02/13/13- 217
02/20/13- 214
02/27/13- 210
03/06/13- 207

slowly but surely I will win the race... now where did that rabbit go?


 Pounds lost: 46.0 
 
0
25.25
50.5
75.75
101
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/1/12 10:20 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Spinach is very eay to grow from seed. We sow the seeds about 4-5 weeks before the last frost date and can usually start harvesting by around the last frost date. Since you are in the Pacific NW, your summers may be cool enough that you could plant seeds now and every 2-4 weeks until about 2 months before yor first fall frost. You can start harvesting baby spinach leaves and continue to harvest the outer leaves as the plant grows. If it starts to bolt, send up a stalk, cut that off and sometimes you can harvest for a while after that.

BATES291's Photo BATES291 Posts: 143
7/1/12 9:54 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for the information. I planted it late April after the last frost in my area (Pacific NW) when I planted all of my other vegetables. It was being sold in the little six packs so I assumed that it was the right time to plant it. I will have to go check with my local nursery to see if it was too late then.

Angela B.
Everett, WA
Midst of a Chrysolis Duo
Flutterwork Duo
Dolvett Quince's Team


FitBit link : www.fitbit.com/user/24BF79

first time around in BLC21
Crimson Butterflies


01/02/13- 224
01/09/13- 226
01/16/13- 220
01/23/13- 222
01/30/13- 216
02/06/13- 215
02/13/13- 217
02/20/13- 214
02/27/13- 210
03/06/13- 207

slowly but surely I will win the race... now where did that rabbit go?


 Pounds lost: 46.0 
 
0
25.25
50.5
75.75
101
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
7/1/12 6:47 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Spinach is a cool season crop. Here in Missouri, its planted in March and April. Mine has already bolted and gone to seed. Depending on were you live, you may have planted it to late in the season to get much of a crop before it started to bolt. It's my guess that is what happed from the pictures. The good news is that you can plant a fall crop, usually in August or September depending on where you live, and harvest until the first hard frost.

BATES291's Photo BATES291 Posts: 143
7/1/12 5:06 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I have a question. I planted spinach this year and it is growing kinda funny. Bare in mind that this is my first garden project as an adult. We always had a garden when I was growing up so I know some basics, but have forgotten most of what I knew then.

As I understand it spinach is supposed to grow in large leaves in a cluster. My spinach, however, has grown into tall stalks with small leaves along the stalk and clusters of small green balls where the leaves connect to the stalk. The picture on the tag that came with my spinach shows the spinach I remember from my childhood. I wanted to post a picture here but I guess I will just have to make it my profile picture. There are two more pictures on mysparkpage as I didn't know how to post them anywhere/way else. Thanks everyone. I appreciate all suggestions and information. Thanks

Edited by: BATES291 at: 7/1/2012 (17:08)
Angela B.
Everett, WA
Midst of a Chrysolis Duo
Flutterwork Duo
Dolvett Quince's Team


FitBit link : www.fitbit.com/user/24BF79

first time around in BLC21
Crimson Butterflies


01/02/13- 224
01/09/13- 226
01/16/13- 220
01/23/13- 222
01/30/13- 216
02/06/13- 215
02/13/13- 217
02/20/13- 214
02/27/13- 210
03/06/13- 207

slowly but surely I will win the race... now where did that rabbit go?


 Pounds lost: 46.0 
 
0
25.25
50.5
75.75
101
NWGARDENGIRL's Photo NWGARDENGIRL Posts: 949
6/17/12 1:20 A

Send Private Message
Reply
thanks for the comments. Preen might help with not letting weed seeds germinate.

 Pounds lost: 6.0 
 
0
11
22
33
44
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
6/15/12 4:18 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
It might work on the seeds

Edited by: SHARJOPAUL at: 6/15/2012 (16:27)
LECATES's Photo LECATES SparkPoints: (172,190)
Fitness Minutes: (113,910)
Posts: 44,011
6/15/12 3:30 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Would a preemergent work on them but not harm the bulbs?

Eastern Shore of Maryland
USING CAPS FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED FRIEND TILL SURGERY! Team leader for Empty Nesters and the Gardening Team.


 current weight: 235.0 
 
272
247.75
223.5
199.25
175
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
6/15/12 1:21 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
NWGARDENGIRL
Since I beleive in using organic methods in gardening when ever possible, I am reluctant to recomend chemical conrol of weeds. However, buttercups maybe one of those things that ar all but impossible to eradicate any other way. A system weed killer like roundup is supposed to do well at killing of existing plants incuding their roots. However, buttercup seeds can survive in the soil for many years, so tilling the soil is likely to bring those to the surface where they can more easily germinate and restarting the problem.
If you choose to use the roundup, dig out the plants you want to keep this fall, being sure to remove any buttercup roots from the plants you want to keep and plant them in your temporary location. Once you have remove your plants, spray the area, let is sit for several days, then remove as much of the buttercup plants as possible. Water the area to encourage any seeds near the surface to germinate and if needed repeat the spray and removal process.
I would wait until next year to replant anything in the area to be sure you have gotten rid of the vast majority of the buttercups. You can spot treet any new ones that come upby paited the roundup on them.

NWGARDENGIRL's Photo NWGARDENGIRL Posts: 949
6/14/12 9:54 P

Send Private Message
Reply
My problem: Buttercup. It's growing all through my English flower bed. I have bulbs, tubers and perennials in that bed and now's not the time to be digging in deep.. But the buttercup just keeps multiplying. It's all through the lilies. It's surrounding my Oriental poppies and I think it's smothered some things. I'm thinking that I am going to have keep cutting off the leaves the rest of the summer. Then in the fall, dig up everything, put everything in a temporary spot for the winter, Spray the entire bed with roundup, then, if it's not to wet, till it up, then cover it with a heavy mulch. In the spring, till it again, then replant and mulch heavily.
Or- any better ideas out there??

 Pounds lost: 6.0 
 
0
11
22
33
44
TDL5685's Photo TDL5685 Posts: 87
6/12/12 3:17 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thank you for the advice. I like the idea of cayenne pepper and pie plates. I will definately nix the mothball idea. And also your right about the upspring of more berry bushes near by 2 actually, 1 on each side. I thought they were completely seperate bushes but now Im thinking they are all part of the same bush! There is hope for my little vegetable garden yet!

 Pounds lost: 32.0 
 
0
35
70
105
140
SHARJOPAUL's Photo SHARJOPAUL Posts: 31,134
6/11/12 10:30 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Depending on what is digging in your garden, Lecates pie pan idea may work especially for birds and sometimes deer. Moth balls are extremely toxic and can be fascinating to animals and children who could eat them causing severe helath problems and death, so personally I would not use them, You can sprinkle cayenne pepper light over the area, it discourages most mammels.
There should be time to replant most things. Lettuce tends to bolt (put out a floower spike and go to seed) with the heat of summer so you may get a small crop before the heat sets in. You can plant a late summer/fall crop of lettuce usually in late August and get a good harvest from it before a hard frost kills it. Carrots actually get sweeter after a light frost so they can also be planted in the late summer.
As for the blackberries, this is NOT the time to transplant them. You would probably lose any crop you would get this year. Wait until early fall. They prefer partial to full sun at least 6-8 hours a day. You should prune out the older canes (the canes only produce well for 2-3 years) and prune back the other canes if the bush is to big to handle. Since you asked about planting them near a fence for support, I assume you have the semi-erect type of blackberries, so you can plant them near a fence I put some posts in the ground then put a bar between them about 3 ft above the ground. This helps hold the canes up. Blackberries spread by underground runners so don't be surprised if you see new plants spring up near your existing plant.

Page: 1 of (3)   1 2 Next Page › Last Page »

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Gardening EXPERT ADVICE Posts

Topics: Last Post:
2013 Ask the Experts 12/22/2013 2:46:44 PM
Tomato Advice 9/22/2013 6:27:23 PM
Counting gardening as exercise? 5/21/2014 10:39:16 AM
Tomatoes 2/20/2014 11:33:26 PM
Daylilies 7/30/2013 3:37:40 PM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=5350x39x46288160

Review our Community Guidelines