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SHANNON267's Photo SHANNON267 Posts: 348
4/6/11 9:23 A

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I have to print out this page. I've used applesauce for subbing before and even soy flour and water for eggs. but the diet pop was a new one on me. I love to bake ( one of my fave stress relievers) and I'm looking forward to trying some of this suggestions. I'll let you know. thanks!

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TARA082's Photo TARA082 Posts: 378
4/3/09 10:44 P

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you can also substitute applesauce (or baby pureed prunes, etc also work) for butter and eggs in recipes... it's always very moist, better for you, and still tastes great!

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BLUEINKPEN's Photo BLUEINKPEN Posts: 1,021
12/13/08 5:44 P

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That's SUCH a good idea! Thanks for sharing.

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MSEMBERSTORM's Photo MSEMBERSTORM Posts: 6,706
12/7/08 8:22 P

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That is an awesome idea! I am going to have to try that!

"A journey of a thousand miles must begin with a single step."
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TAT2MOM's Photo TAT2MOM SparkPoints: (0)
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11/17/08 1:33 P

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When I bake a cake I use a can of diet pop instead of other other ingredients (eggs, oil, water) and it turns out super moist with less then half the fat of a regular cake.

Also when I make banana bread or muffins of any kind I replace the butter and/or oil with low fat or fat free yogurt. Once again making it super moist and a lot less calories and fat!

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TAT2MOM's Photo TAT2MOM SparkPoints: (0)
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11/17/08 1:30 P

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I toss a little bit honey over my apples and it keeps them from going brown and they don't get bitter like the lemon juice does.

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KIERAE's Photo KIERAE SparkPoints: (177,652)
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10/3/08 12:53 P

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lemon juice or ascorbic acid (ie vit c crushed and added to a couple cups of water) or soaking them in a bit of natural lemon-lime soda/carbonated juice drink or 7-UP will keep them from browning, without imparting the heavy flavor that may come when using fresh lemon juice.

I like living. I have sometimes been wildly, despairingly, acutely miserable, racked with sorrow, but through it all I still know quite certainly that just to be alive is a grand thing. Agatha Christie
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LACE76's Photo LACE76 Posts: 3,160
10/3/08 12:48 P

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Off the wall question here... How do you keep cut apples from turning brown?

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VVEDD1223's Photo VVEDD1223 Posts: 503
9/11/08 10:01 A

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This is great, THANKS!




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ROCKNNICCO's Photo ROCKNNICCO Posts: 263
5/3/08 4:31 P

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thanks for posting this stuff great info!

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QUEENIEB1's Photo QUEENIEB1 Posts: 330
4/24/08 1:38 P

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Thanks for posting this! This will be very helpful! emoticon
~Beth

Yesterday I dared to struggle. Today I dare to win.~Bernadette Devlin.



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KIERAE's Photo KIERAE SparkPoints: (177,652)
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4/10/08 1:09 P

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Brown sugar substitution:

1 cup artificial sweetener*
1/4 cup sugar-free maple syrup

Mix ingredients well.

Replaces 1 cup of regular brown sugar to be used when baking.

---------------------

When substituting honey/maple syrup/sugar

# To use honey in place of sugar, use 7/8 cup for every cup of sugar, and reduce the liquid in the recipe by 3 tablespoons.
# To use sugar in place of honey, use 1-1/4 cups of sugar plus 1/4 cup more liquid.
# To use maple syrup in place of sugar in cooking, use 3/4 cup for every 1 cup of sugar.
# To use maple syrup in place of a cup of sugar in baking, use 3/4 cup, but decrease the total amount of liquid in the recipe by about 3 tablespoons for each cup of syrup you use.
# To use sugar in place of a cup of maple syrup, use 1-1/4 cups of sugar plus 1/4 cup more liquid.

------------------

Maple sugar sub:

1 cup splenda mixed with 1 cup water with 1 tsp maple flavor

------------------

JO'S SWEETENED CONDENSED MILK

1/2c cold water
1-1/3c Carnation Notfat Dry Milk Powder
1/2 c Sugar Twin or Sprinkle Sweet or splenda

Place cold water in a 2-c glass measuring cup. Stir in dry milk powder until mixture makes a smooth paste. Cover & microwave on HIGH(100% power) for 45-60 sec or until mixture is very hot, but not to the boiling point. Stir in Sugar Twin. Mix well to combine. Cover & refrigerate for at least 2hr before using. Will keep up to 2 weeks in refrigerator. Use in any recipe that calls for sweetened condensed milk. Makes equivalent of one 12-oz can commercial brand.

This is another Joanna Lund/Healthy Exchange Recipe.

---------------

Agave Syrup:

Composition
Agave syrup consists primarily of fructose and glucose. One source gives 92% fructose and 8% glucose; another gives 56% fructose and 20% glucose. These differences presumably reflect variation from one vendor of agave syrup to another.

As a sweetener, Agave syrup is notable in that it has a low glycemic index and low glycemic load. Apparently lower than most if not all other natural sweeteners on the market.

Culinary use
Agave syrup may be substituted for sugar in recipes.

Use 1/3 cup of agave syrup for every 1 cup of sugar in the original recipe.
The quantity of liquids in the original recipe must be reduced due to the moisture included in the syrup.
Some chefs also reduce the oven temperature by 25F in recipes requiring baking.

----------------------

Guide to some alternative flours for the gluten-free diet (from the glutenfreegirl.com):


Almond flour

Take raw, blanched almonds, grind them to a fine flour (but not so much that they become almond butter), and you have almond flour. This and other nut flours — such as chestnut and hazelnut, macadamia and pistachio — add protein and vibrant taste to gluten-free baking.

Amaranth flour

The tiny whole grains that make a surprising breakfast cereal can be ground into a fine flour. Frankly, I have never successfully ground them in the spice grinder. I buy this flour in small bags, and add it in handfuls to crepes and quiche crusts. Amaranth has a grassy, earthy taste, so it works best in savory dishes, like pizza dough.

Arrowroot flour

The name alone is enough to make you want to try it. Legend has it that the Arawak people of the West Indies, long before the arrival of Columbus, used arrowroot powder to draw out the poison from arrow wounds. Hopefully, it will have similar beneficial properties for those of you cooking gluten-free. It is best used as a thickener, for rouxs and sauces, and fillings for fruit pies. Those who are allergic to corn are especially grateful for the existence of this starch.

Bean flours

Dried beans can be ground into flours as easily as grains can. Chickpea flour — also known as garbanzo bean or ceci flour — makes a memorable flatbread in the south of France. Lentil flour shows up in Indian cuisine. Even fava beans become flour, and show up in some commercial gluten-free baking mixes. Experiment with the beans you like, in small doses.

Corn flour (**not SB approved)

You may not have heard of corn flour yet, but you have eaten it. Have you ever enjoyed a corn tortilla in a Mexican restaurant? That was made of corn flour. After corn kernels have been dried, soaked in lime water, and then washed, the corn is ground into a fine flour. Buy some authentic masa harina (as Mexican cooks call it) and make your own corn tortillas at home. You can also try it in gluten-free corn bread.

Guar gum

The seeds of the guar plant, which grows in India and Pakistan, make a granular flour when dried and ground. Take a look at many processed foods — such as commercial ice creams and puddings — and you will see guar gum on the list of ingredients. In small amounts, guar gum can be a somewhat effective binder, mimicking some of the effects of gluten.

Millet

Mild and ever-so-slightly sweet, millet is an adaptable grain. It soaks up the tastes of the foods surrounding it. It sings in harmony, rather than blaring out loud. Millet flour lends a crumbly texture to breads and muffins, and it is especially good in quick breads.

Potato starch (**not SB approved)

Potatoes are endlessly useful. Their starchiness makes them fantastic when mashed. And that starch, when extruded by machines and put into little bags, helps gluten-free cooks to eat well. As is true for all the gluten-free flours, potato starch will not substitute directly for wheat. It needs to be combined with other flours and starches in a blend. Those who celebrate Passover or are allergic to corn are particularly grateful for the existence of potato starch. (This is not to be confused with potato flour, which is dried potatoes ground into a flour. If you want the taste of potatoes, choose potato flour.)

Quinoa

As a grain, quinoa is nutty and delicious. As a flour, quinoa is a little bitter. It is packed with protein, however, and the texture adds density to gluten-free baked goods. I like to use a little quinoa flour, in combination with other gluten-free flours, in something savory: cheddar-cheese biscuits; zucchini bread; or herb muffins.

Rice flours

When rice farmers harvest rice, they shuck the grains of its outer husk, which is inedible. What is left after this process is brown rice. If the farmer also removes the germ and brain from the rice grain, he or she is left with white rice. Brown rice flour is made from the first type of rice, and white rice flour is produced from the latter. Whether it is brown or white (or black or green), rice comes in three different categories: long-grain, medium-grain, and short-grain. Each type can be ground into rice flour. The starchiness of short-grain rice makes it the perfect candidate for rice flour. Smooth and finely ground, sweet rice flour thickens sauces and gravies so well that no one eating them can tell they are gluten-free.


Sorghum

It is astounding that people in India and across the continent of Africa have been eating sorghum for generations, and I only discovered it when I had to go gluten-free. To me, sorghum flour is the closest in texture and taste to traditional wheat flour of any of the gluten-free flours. I’ve come to love it, and I use it in nearly every baked good I make. In a few cases, it even works as a direct substitution for wheat flour, such as in pancakes. It makes the basis for a decent gluten-free bread, which is a godsend. Some people, however, detect a bitter taste in sorghum flour, so you should try some for yourself.

Tapioca flour (**not SB approved)

What we in the West call tapioca comes from a plant originally from Asia, known as cassava. (In South America, it is known as manioc.) When the root has been dried, it is ground into a white flour. This tapioca flour is also known as tapioca starch (just to confuse us). Its starchiness makes it an excellent gluten-free flour, but it must be used in combination with other flours to make great baked goods.

Teff

The tiny seeds of teff make a fascinating porridge. Dark brown as molasses, with a slight taste of chocolate, teff porridge will fill you up in the mornings. You can also cook up the grains the way you would polenta. As a flour, teff is nearly miraculous. The fine flour — ground from the tiny seeds — almost dissolve in baking, giving it a slightly gelatinous quality. This binds the baked goods in a somewhat similar fasion to gluten. Teff flour adds to fabulous waffles and banana breads.

Xanthan gum

Geeky chefs in love with molecular gastronomy adore xanthan gum. So do commercial food producers, who put xanthan gum in salad dressings and frozen foods as a stabilizer. If you have ever looked at the ingredients of your toothpaste, you saw xanthan gum there, since it binds everything together in a uniform consistency. Now, you can buy some for your gluten-free baked goods. Only a tiny amount (1/2 teaspoon or less) is enough to bind that dough to make cookies and pie crusts.

-----------------------

Bisquick substitute:

Extra Light Baking Mix (From American Whole Foods Cuisine)


YIELDS: 7 Cups MIX

4 c whole wheat pastry flour
1 c nonfat dry milk powder
2 1/2 T baking powder
1 1/2 t salt
1/2 c oil (canola)

Mix all dry ingredients together in a food processor. Drizzle in oil while blades are running Mix completely.

Store in a Freezer Bag in the Freezer, or in an airtight container in the refrigerator.

-------------------------

Shake 'N Bake Mix - Low carb Style

2 cups dried onion
2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp pepper blend
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp red pepper flakes
1/2 tsp ground sage
1 tsp dried rosemary
1 Tbsp sweet paprika
1 tsp dried thyme
1/2 tsp dried basil
2 bay leaves crushed
1 1/2 cups grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 C protein Powder

Place dried onion in a food processor or blender. Pulse for 1 minute. Add everything except the Parmesan Cheese and pulse for 1 minute. Add the Parmesan and pulse for about 10 seconds.

You can use this as a coating for fried fish, fried chicken, country fried steak, chicken, pork etc.

------------------------



Edited by: KIERAE at: 4/10/2008 (13:10)
I like living. I have sometimes been wildly, despairingly, acutely miserable, racked with sorrow, but through it all I still know quite certainly that just to be alive is a grand thing. Agatha Christie
-----------------------
Kierae - happily maintaining since 1/2009

Co-leads:South Beach Diet/Smart Carbing/GLBTQ Spark Network
www.myfitnesspal.com/food/diary/Kier
ae

www.facebook.com/Robinlove60


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