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11/7/09 12:17 A

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I LOVE Dr. Faustman! I hope she is successful - reading her reports make me so excited to think there actually might be a cure out there somewhere.

Any other recent news? I only follow Faustman Lab, really.

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TALTEXANNA's Photo TALTEXANNA Posts: 406
9/17/09 11:22 P

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http://www.faustmanlab.org/docs/newsletter
s/Faustman_updates_f09.pdf

Thought you guys might find this interesting. I've been following her work (as much as I can, lol) and it seems interesting and maybe promising.

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6/18/09 4:58 A

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Medtronic Cares Program*
for pumpers in need of a helping hand


In response to Smiths Medical's decision to discontinue their diabetes business, and in the spirit of Medtronic's 25 year commitment to helping people manage their diabetes, we'd like to offer a helping hand.
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If you would like more information about this program please provide your contact information below. We'll be in touch within 48 hours to help you along.
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** Pursuant to a value package based on prices offered to uninsured, cash-pay patients
Or talk to someone now: 1.800.646.4633 (option 6)
https://www.minimed.com/cares/

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6/18/09 4:54 A

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ADA: Fluorescent Intravascular Glucose Sensor Appears Accurate By Kristina Fiore, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Published: June 09, 2009
Reviewed by Dori F. Zaleznik, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston and Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner

NEW ORLEANS, June 9 -- A novel continuous glucose monitor that is placed intravascularly and uses fluorescence to provide a read-out of blood sugar appears to be accurate, especially in the hypoglycemic range, researchers said here.

In a small trial of five patients, values displayed by the new device were comparable to those determined by laboratory blood glucose samples, William H. Markle, president of device manufacturer GluMetrics of Irvine, Calif., said at a poster session here at the American Diabetes Association meeting.

"What's unique about it is that it's a nonenzymatic sensor, so it's not consuming glucose in the process of sensing," Markle said.

Ostensibly, that's beneficial for patients entering a bout of hypoglycemia.Action Points
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Explain that a new type of fluorescing glucose sensor placed intravascularly appeared to be accurate in a small trial of type 1 diabetes patients.


Note that the device became more accurate in the lower ranges of blood glucose levels, and one of its advantages is that it monitors levels in "real time" because of its location.
In fact, the device was most accurate in the lower ranges of blood glucose.


"Unlike enzymatic sensors, the lower [blood glucose] goes, the more accurate it is," Markle said.


Having a device with good accuracy in the hypoglycemic range is critical, Howard Wolpert, M.D., of Harvard, said in an interview.


"This study indicates that fluorescent technology has real sensitivity in low glucose ranges, so I think there's real promise there," Dr. Wolpert said.


He explained that this issue is particularly relevant because of recent findings that hypoglycemia is associated with markedly increased mortality, especially in intensive care unit patients. (See: ICU Study Links Tight Glucose Control to Excess Mortality (NICE-SUGAR) and Risks of Tight Glucose Control in ICU May Outweigh Benefits)


The sensor is based on quenched fluorescence using a modified boronic-acid glucose receptor, the researchers said. A blue-light challenge reveals a green fluorescent response, and the higher the level of glucose, the higher the fluorescence.


To test their device, the researchers recruited five volunteers with type 1 diabetes for an eight-hour, outpatient feasibility study.


The sensors were inserted in a peripheral vein at the antecubital fossa with a 22 Ga needle and a retractable cannula.


One failed upon insertion because of mechanical damage, Markle said.


Readings from the other four sensors were taken at one-minute intervals and compared with hospital and lab blood glucose measurements from venous samples in the contralateral arm once every 15 minutes.


The researchers found that 100% of all values below 75 m/dL were within about 15 mg/dL of the reference values, and 94.5% of all values of at least 75 mg/dL were within plus or minus 20 mg/dL of the reference values.


The mean absolute relative difference was 8.95%, Markle said, and no adverse events were reported.


Vivian Fonseca, M.D., of Tulane University and the Scott and White Clinic at Texas A&M University, said one of the most important aspects of the novel device is its intravascular location, which gives it access to the actual bloodstream, as opposed to tissues below the skin.


"Conventional glucose monitoring measures glucose in interstitial fluid in subcutaneous tissue, which is problematic as there is a lag between the two," Dr. Fonseca said.


Instead, he said, this device measures blood glucose in "real-time."


"There is a great need for a device like this, which may revolutionize how we take care of patients with diabetes in the hospital," he said.


Noting that many previous efforts have failed, he called this study "very small and, at best, preliminary."


"Most importantly, they have not tested it in patients in the hospital with critical illness. I suppose that will be the next step," Dr. Fonesca said.


Markle said that since this was the "very first human experiment" with the device, more studies will be done.




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6/18/09 4:53 A

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ADA: New Screening Modes Work for Diabetic Retinopathy By Crystal Phend, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Published: June 11, 2009
Reviewed by Dori F. Zaleznik, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston and Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner

NEW ORLEANS, June 11 -- For diabetic retinopathy screening, telemedicine and photographing fewer fields allow for faster detection for more patients, researchers said.Action Points
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Explain to interested patients that the American Diabetes Association recommends annual dilated eye exams for all patients with diabetes.


Note that these studies were published as abstracts and presented orally or as posters at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.
These screening approaches appeared to retain good specificity and sensitivity for diabetic retinopathy detection while reducing the burden on ophthalmologists and patients in two studies reported here at the American Diabetes Association meeting.


These kinds of studies are important to improving the rates of annual screening recommended for all diabetic patients by the ADA, particularly in underserved areas, commented Sue Kirkman, M.D., ADA vice-president of clinical affairs.


In the U.S., the average retinal screening rate is only 65%, noted Athena Philis-Tsimikas, M.D., of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, and colleagues.


Since that rate falls even lower in underserved communities, her group partnered with community health centers to bring a mobile medical unit equipped with a nonmydriatic digital retinal camera to those areas in San Diego County.


Over an 18-month period, 1,229 people with diabetes and no or minimal insurance were screened.


A trained technician took retinal pictures, determined the presence of significant retinopathy using EyePacs imaging software, and provided immediate referral if it was present.


A retinal specialist independently read all the images to determine accuracy of the screening.


Comparing them, the technician's screening had an overall accuracy of 92% with a specificity of 96% and sensitivity of 86%.


The negative predictive value was 79%; the positive predictive value was 97%.


The researchers did not calculate number needed to screen, but diagnosed diabetic retinopathy in 183 of 1,229 screened individuals.


With this screening strategy, the technician could do preliminary screening, with only positive screens sent to a retinal specialist for review to maximize use of the specialist's time and expertise, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas said.


Patients also benefited from accurate, sameday evaluation without long wait times as well as an opportunity for patient education, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas noted.


The accuracy of another strategy to increase efficiency and resource utilization was examined in a second study by Jyothis George, M.B.B.S., of the Queen's Medical Research Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland, and colleagues.


Dilated seven-field retinal photography is the gold standard but "too resource intensive to be used for screening," they noted.


Single-field photography -- which encompasses only the central 45º of the retina most vital for vision-threatening complications -- without dilation is more popular for screening, Dr. George said.


His group compared the two approaches in a subanalysis of the Edinburgh Type 2 Diabetes Study that included 751 asymptomatic individuals screened with dilated, seven-field methods who also had routine single-field retinal photography within a year.


Despite small numbers, the researchers found 92.3% sensitivity (95% CI 73 to 98) for diabetic retinopathy detection and referral for further investigation in the patients with at least moderate diabetic retinopathy (24 of 26 cases).


Specificity was even higher at 99.8% (99.1-99.9) for single-field screening.


There was one false positive with single-field screening -- a case of venous occlusion wrongly classified as referable diabetic retinopathy.


However, the performance of single-field methods in the overall cohort was not as good:


65.4% sensitivity (95% CI 59.1 to 71.3)
86.5% specificity (95% CI 83 to 89.3)
12.8% of those without diabetic retinopathy were labeled as mild cases 36.7% with mild diabetic retinopathy were missed

But the researchers said "this is clinically not significant as our screening strategy is to recall all these patients for yearly single-field nonmydriatic retinal screening."


They concluded that their single-field method would be accurate "when used in conjunction with integrated diabetes care."



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ADA: Diabetic Retinopathy May Be On the Rise By Crystal Phend, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Published: June 11, 2009
Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner

NEW ORLEANS, June 11 -- After two decades on the rise, retinopathy now affects more than a third of all diabetes patients, according to the latest nationally representative estimate.Action Points
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Explain to interested patients that high blood glucose levels from poorly controlled diabetes can cause damage to the retinas, eventually leading to vision loss.


Note that this study was published as an abstract and presented orally at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.
The prevalence of the condition appeared to increase across racial and ethnic groups between the 1988-1994 and 2005-2006 iterations of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, Jinan Saaddine, M.D., M.P.H., of the CDC, and colleagues found.


Non-Hispanic blacks had the highest prevalence of diabetic retinopathy, and the greatest increase, the researchers reported here at the American Diabetes Association meeting.


"It could be that we're not doing a good job controlling people with diabetes," Dr. Saaddine said, emphasizing the need for good glycemic and blood pressure management alongside diabetes prevention efforts.


"All the studies have shown that control of these two risk factors will delay the progression of diabetic retinopathy and the vision loss related to it," she noted.


But she cautioned that comparison between surveys was complicated by some differences in methodology and by the small sample size of the latest survey.


NHANES III from 1988-1994 used only one photo of one eye to diagnose retinopathy whereas the latest NHANES used two 45° color fundus images of each eye taken on a nonmydriatic digital camera.


The analysis of the 2005-2006 survey included interviews and examinations with gradable fundus photos from 349 participants age 40 and older who had self-reported diabetes.


Among them, the overall diabetic retinopathy prevalence was 34.3%. Ethnic and racial breakdowns from the two surveys were as follows:


Non-Hispanic whites: 30.8% prevalence (95% CI 22.6 to 40.5), compared with 18.2% in NHANES III (95% CI 12.9 to 23.6) Non-Hispanic blacks, 47.8% (95% CI 35.7 to 60.2), compared with 26.5% (95% CI 19.3 to 33.6) Mexican Americans, 40.0% (95% CI 25.9 to 56.0) compared with 33.4% (95% CI 26.7 to 40.1) in NHANES III

The prevalence of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy was 20%, with a 10% prevalence of moderate-to-severe cases, classified using the Airlie House system.


Proliferative diabetic retinopathy prevalence was just 3%, while, late stage retinal damage -- vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy -- was 6%.


One of the major risk factors was duration of diabetes. The prevalence rose from about 10% for those who had been diagnosed for less than five years, to 39% for those diagnosed for five to 14 years, all the way to 70% for those diagnosed for more than 15 years.


Every five additional years of diabetes duration increased the odds for diabetic retinopathy by 60% (OR 1.60, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.5).


Other risk factors for diabetic retinopathy in the multivariate analysis included:


Male sex (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2 to 4.0)
Higher severity of diabetes, indicated by use of insulin and oral diabetes treatments versus pills alone (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 5.7) or use of pills alone versus no treatment (OR 5.0, 95% CI 0.7 to 33.3) Higher average systolic blood pressure (OR 1.3 per 10 mm Hg, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.5) Higher hemoglobin A1c (OR 1.4 per 1%, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.7)

While these risk factors showed no surprises, this suggested that "the ones that we discovered as risk factors 20 years ago, they're still risk factors and they're not really controlled well," Dr. Saaddine said.


Prevalence also tended to be higher among minority racial and ethnic groups in the univariate analysis, although this was not significant, most likely because of the small sample size, Dr. Saaddine said.


"Screening for diabetic retinopathy is efficacious and cost-effective, but there has been suboptimal implementation," she said.




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ADA: Still No Culprit for Excess Mortality with Tight Glucose Control By Crystal Phend, Staff Writer, MedPage Today
Published: June 10, 2009
Reviewed by Zalman S. Agus, MD; Emeritus Professor University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and Dorothy Caputo, MA, RN, BC-ADM, CDE, Nurse Planner

SAN FRANCISCO, June 10 -- Lower hemoglobin A1c levels of themselves don't appear to increase mortality risk with intensive glucose control, subanalyses of two major diabetes trials revealed.

Nor was severe hypoglycemia more strongly associated with mortality when treatment was aimed below the standard 7.0% target for hemoglobin A1c, ACCORD and VA Diabetes Trial researchers reported here at the American Diabetes Association meeting.

Ruling out these suspected causes left ACCORD investigators at a loss to explain the 22% excess mortality seen with tight glucose control in their trial.

Both trials along with a third -- ADVANCE -- shook up the diabetes community when negative cardiovascular results for all three emerged at last year's ADA meeting.Action Points
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Explain to interested patients that intensive glucose control includes therapies targeted to get hemoglobin A1c levels down below 7.0%.


Note that these studies were presented orally at a conference. These data and conclusions should be considered to be preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.
The 10,251-patient Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) study showed no significant reduction in composite nonfatal MI, nonfatal stroke, and death from cardiovascular causes (hazard ratio 0.90, 95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.04). (See ADA: ACCORD Diabetes Trial a Complete Bust)


Intensive therapy in the 1,791-patient VA Diabetes Trial similarly failed to have a significant impact on cardiovascular event rates (HR 0.868, P=0.12). (See ADA: VA Diabetes Trial Appears to Vindicate Rosiglitazone (Avandia) Safety)


With no apparent cardiovascular benefit in any of the trials and significant harm in ACCORD, tight glucose control was criticized as going too far. (See ADA: Intensive Diabetes Treatment to Blame for Excess Mortality)


However, the latest ACCORD analysis revealed that, paradoxically, lower actually was better in both groups, but particularly for the intensive group, reported Matthew C. Riddle, M.D., of the Oregon Health Science University in Portland.


Each 1% lower average HbA1c was associated with a 56% lower relative risk of mortality after adjustment for other factors in the intensive therapy group (P=0.0001); whereas the same 1% lower HbA1c reduced risk by a nonsignificant 14% in the standard therapy group (P=0.17).


Even more notable was the fact that mortality risk increased steadily for the standard therapy group from a hemoglobin A1c of 6% to 9% but only rose in the intensive therapy group for those with A1c averages above 7%.


"The excess mortality risk in the intensively treated patients occurred with patients who failed to succeed in getting their A1c close to 6% and under 7%," Dr. Riddle said. "It was those who remained high who were at risk."


Thus, it might behoove physicians to back off an intensive goal for patients who cannot achieve a rapid, sustained improvement in A1c with aggressive therapy, which would usually become apparent within three months, he said.


"We don't know why this is," he said. "But we think this has important medical implications" -- that there is a population of patients for whom intensive glucose lowering appears safe.


One important aspect of safety was severe hypoglycemia, which also correlated with mortality, Denise Bonds, M.D., M.P.H., now of the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute in Bethesda, Md., reported at the packed ADA session.


However, the risk of hypoglycemia was actually lower for the intensive control group patients who got toward goal faster compared with those in the standard therapy group (HR 0.86 versus 0.72% for an initial four-month A1c drop of 2% versus 1%).


The association with mortality was also weaker for hypoglycemia in the intensive group than in the standard group (HR 1.28 versus 2.87). Nor did it account for overall mortality findings, as discussed at ADA last year. (See ADA: Intensive Diabetes Treatment to Blame for Excess Mortality)


Likewise, in the VA Diabetes Trial, severe hypoglycemia was associated with a relatively greater excess risk of cardiovascular mortality and first MI in the standard versus intensive glucose control arm, Stephen N. Davis, M.D., of Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., reported at the conference.


Although severe hypoglycemia was more common with tight control, there appeared to be no threshold hemoglobin A1c level protective against severe hypoglycemia, which actually tended to increase with elevated A1c, he said.


"There was concern we went too far," commented John Buse, M.D., Ph.D., of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, N.C., and ACCORD steering committee member. "But it's probably more that we pushed too hard in the people who weren't getting to goal."


"You have to individualize these targets," he said, which was the take-home message expressed by many experts and remains part of ADA guidelines.


The VA Diabetes Trial revealed that one important clue to such individualization may be duration of diabetes prior to considering intensive glucose control, reported William C. Duckworth, M.D., of the VA Medical Center in Phoenix.


Diabetes patients had reduced composite cardiovascular event and mortality rates with intensive glucose management if they started on it between four and 15 years after diagnosis.


Risk was elevated, though, with intensive therapy for the rest of patients in a U-shaped curve. Since the VA trial included only patients who'd already failed maximum oral agents or insulin, those who entered the trial in the first three years after diagnosis might be assumed to fit a more difficult to treat profile, Dr. Duckworth said.


Risk of cardiovascular events and death was also somewhat elevated in those who started intensive therapy at least 15 years after diagnosis and was doubled among those who started after 20 years' disease duration.


"The duration of diagnosed diabetes must be a factor in considering initiating intensive glucose control," Dr. Duckworth recommended. "Treat early and treat carefully."


The researchers of both trials cautioned that further research was needed because the studies were not designed to answer these questions and thus the findings they reported here were hypothesis generating only.




ACCORD was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the CDC, and General Clinical Research Centers. Medications, equipment, and supplies were provided by Abbott, Amylin, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Closer Healthcare, GlaxoSmithKline, King, Merck, Novartis, Novo Nordisk, Omron, sanofi-aventis, and Schering-Plough.

The VA Diabetes Trial was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs.


Dr. Duckworth reported receiving research support from Roche Diagnostics and consulting for Novo Nordisk and Caremark. Dr. Davis reported conflicts of interest with Amylin Pharmaceuticals and sanofi-aventis.


Dr. Riddle reported conflicts of interest with Amylin, Lilly, Sanofi-Aventis, and Pfizer. Dr. Bonds reported no conflicts of interest.


Dr. Buse reported conflicts of interest with Insulet.



Primary source: American Diabetes Association Source reference:
Riddle MC, et al "New analyses from ACCORD and VADT" ADA 2009.




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SUPERDUPER26's Photo SUPERDUPER26 Posts: 1,553
6/11/09 4:01 P

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www.diabetes.org/diabetes-research/l
at
e-breaking-scientific-sessions-news.jsp


Info from the American Diabetes Association's 69th Scientific Sessions, held in New Orleans this year.
There's some cool stuff coming down the pipes, but no cures YET. Maybe next year??? I'll just keep hoping....

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5/23/09 3:46 A

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ClinicalTrials.gov - diabetes mellitus type 1

www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_jo
ur
nal_individual.asp?blog_id=2086262


emoticon emoticon

Edited by: ADRIATARAS at: 5/23/2009 (03:47)
TALTEXANNA's Photo TALTEXANNA Posts: 406
2/7/09 11:08 P

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I know it's been a while since anybody posted on this particular thread, but I was just wondering if anybody's heard anything new? Last year some time I heard that the doctor that had treated, or cured, diabetes in mice was starting a human trial sometime last spring. I kind of lost track of how that was coming along since they don't say much while the trials last (and I was a little busy being pregnant and miserable, lol), but just thought I'd put out a few feelers among the team to see if you guys knew anything new. Thanks in advance! -- Maggie emoticon

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10/9/08 1:36 A

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A follow up to YERACHMIEL's post in April, the trial is over and results are out. I was luck enough to participate in this study, got me a free CGM. :) And an A1C that went down 1.2%. Here's a link to the article on the JDRF website, it has links to the press release and other artciles.

http://www.jdrf.org/index.cfm?fuseaction
=home.viewpage&page_id=3421E81F-1321-C
844-13C2A385D633CFD3

I know my endorconologists is telling every one who will listen about this. We're all hoping the insurance companies will perk up and listen to these results and cover all our CGM needs.

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9/9/08 12:01 P

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Hey super mine shut down after being sick with the flu or whatever then right after my appendix had to be removed they said it was my body fighting itself instead of the infection. I would love to hear that one shot could prevent this disease or stop it in its tracks!!

"you CAN do ALL things through Christ which STRENGTHENS you"
phil 4:13


“I don't believe in failure.”

( this includes getting healthy!!)


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Super,

Wouldn't it be great if a simple injection cured diabetes? It was a virus that shut down my beta cells - how ironic that a virus could create new cells!


"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." - Eleanor Roosevelt

"You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. " - Eleanor Roosevelt

"The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams." - Eleanor Roosevelt


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27-AUG-2008

Cells change identity in promising breakthrough


NEW YORK - Scientists have transformed one type of cell into another in living mice, a big step toward the goal of growing replacement tissues to treat a variety of diseases.

The cell identity switch turned ordinary pancreas cells into the rarer type that churns out insulin, essential for preventing diabetes. But its implications go beyond diabetes to a host of possibilities, scientists said.

It's the second advance in about a year that suggests that someday doctors might be able to use a patient's own cells to treat disease or injury without turning to stem cells taken from embryos.

The work is "a major leap" in reprogramming cells from one kind to another, said one expert not involved in the research, John Gearhart of the University of Pennsylvania.

That's because the feat was performed in living mice rather than a lab dish, the process was efficient and it was achieved directly without going through a middleman like embryonic stem cells, he said.

The newly created cells made insulin in diabetic mice, though they were not cured. But if the experiment's approach proves viable, it might lead to treatments like growing new heart cells after a heart attack or nerve cells to treat disorders such as ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.

Douglas Melton, co-director of the Harvard Stem Cell Institute and a researcher with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, cautioned that the approach is not ready for people.

He and his colleagues report the research in a paper published online Wednesday by the journal Nature.

Basically, the identity switch comes about by a reprogramming process that changes the pattern of which genes are active and which are shut off.

Scientists have long hoped to find a way to reprogram a patient's cells to produce new ones. Research with stem cells, and similar entities called iPS cells that were announced last year, has aimed to achieve this in a two-step process.

The first step results in a primitive and highly versatile cell. This intermediary is then guided to mature into whatever cell type scientists want. That guiding process has proven difficult to do efficiently, especially for creating insulin-producing cells, Gearhart noted.

In contrast, the new method holds the promise of going directly from one mature cell type to another. It's like a scientist becoming a lawyer without having to go back to kindergarten and grow up again, Melton says.

So, he says, someday scientists may be able to replace dead nerve or heart cells in people by converting some neighboring cells. At the same time, he stressed that it's still important to study embryonic stem cells and iPS cells.

The Melton team started its work with pancreas cells that pump out gut enzymes used in digestion and turned them into pancreatic "beta" cells, which make insulin.

The researchers destroyed beta cells in mice with a poison, giving the mice diabetes. Then they injected the pancreas with viruses that slipped into the enzyme-making cells. These viruses delivered three genes that control the activity of other genes.

Just three days later, new insulin-secreting cells started to show up. By a week after that, more than a fifth of the virally infected cells started making insulin. That shows "an amazingly efficient effect," commented Richard Insel, executive vice president of research at the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.

Scientists found evidence that the newcomers were converts from mature enzyme-making cells. They identified the new cells as beta cells by their detailed appearance and behavior, and Melton said they've continued functioning for months.

The new cells didn't fully replenish the insulin supply, but maybe there were too few of them, or they were hampered by not forming clusters like ordinary beta cells do, researchers said.

The work brings "more excitement to the idea of using reprogramming as a way to treat diabetes," said researcher Mark Kay of Stanford University, who is studying the approach with liver cells.

Christopher Newgard, who studies beta cells at Duke University Medical Center, called the work convincing but cautioned that significant scientific questions remained about using the approach in treating disease.

Melton, who began his diabetes research in 1993 when his infant son was diagnosed with the illness, said he's obsessed with trying to find a new treatment or cure for Type 1 diabetes, in which beta cells are destroyed.

"I wake up every day thinking about how to make beta cells," he said.

Melton said he hopes drugs can replace the virus approach because of concern about injecting viruses into people.

As for converting other kinds of cells, scientists noted that the two cell types in the mouse experiment are closely related, and it remains to be shown whether the trick can be achieved with more distant combinations. In any case, scientists would have to deliver different reprogramming signals to other kinds of cells, Melton said.

---

On the Net:

http://www.nature.com/nature

Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.



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New Antioxidant Drug Shows Promise Against Diabetes
But more studies on cardiovascular risks needed, report says
By Ed Edelson
HealthDay Reporter

FRIDAY, May 23 (HealthDay News) -- A new antioxidant drug shows benefits in the prevention and treatment of diabetes, but more research on possible cardiovascular risks is needed before it is used widely, a new study indicates.

Preliminary results on the drug, succinobucol, have been presented at medical meetings. The full study is published in the May 24 issue of The Lancet.

"There is more data in the article than in the previous presentation, with greater detail on the prevention of diabetes and glycemic [sugar] control," said study author Dr. Jean-Claude Tardif, director of the research center at the Montreal Heart Institute in Canada.

"There are several interesting findings that include a large reduction of new cases of diabetes and also glycemic control in patients who already have diabetes," Tardif said. "But there needs to be confirmation before it is used widely, because there was no effect on clinical endpoints such as heart attack and stroke."

Some confirmation of the drug's effectiveness is expected from a major trial that is nearing completion, Tardif said. Results of that trial should be published "within the next few months," he said.

Succinobucol is a chemical relative of probucol, a cholesterol-lowering drug taken off the market in the United States in 1995 because of side effects. In addition to its antioxidant effects, succinobucol also reduces inflammation.

The trial reported in The Lancet included 6,144 people, 37 percent of whom had diabetes and all of whom had been hospitalized for a heart attack or the dangerous heart rhythm problem called unstable angina. For two years, half of the participants took succinobucol daily, while the other half took a placebo. All were taking other drugs, such as cholesterol-lowering statins, beta blockers or ACE inhibitors.

Among the participants who did not have diabetes when the study began, 4.2 percent of those not taking succinobucol developed the disease, compared to 1.64 percent of those taking the drug, a 64 percent risk reduction. For those with diabetes, taking succinobucol provided better blood sugar control than not taking the drug.

Atrial fibrillation, a dangerous heartbeat abnormality, was twice as likely to develop during the trial in those taking succinobucol. There was no difference in the incidence of death, cardiac arrest, heart attack, stroke or other cardiovascular endpoints between those taking or not taking the drug.

"The study results need confirmation before it is used widely, because there was no effect on those clinical endpoints," Tardif said. "But that is true of all the drugs now used in diabetes. There is no evidence that they reduce heart attacks and strokes."

The chief side effect of the drug was diarrhea, reported by 23 percent of those taking it. One in seven of those reporting diarrhea stopped taking succinobucol.

More information

Currently available drugs for diabetes are described by the American Diabetes Association.


"No one can make you feel inferior without your consent." - Eleanor Roosevelt

"You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You are able to say to yourself, "I have lived through this horror. I can take the next thing that comes along." . . . You must do the thing you think you cannot do. " - Eleanor Roosevelt

"The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams." - Eleanor Roosevelt


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Combo Kidney-Pancreas Transplant Boosts Survival in Diabetics
Type 1 patients did better than those having kidney replacement alone

WEDNESDAY, May 21 (HealthDay News) -- Compared to kidney transplantation alone, a simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplant improves the likelihood of long-term survival in patients with type 1 diabetes and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), according to a German study.

The researchers analyzed the long-term outcomes of more than 11,000 patients with type 1 diabetes and ESRD who had a kidney transplant between 1984 and 2000, including 3,500 who had simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplantation. In some cases, patient and transplanted kidney survival were evaluated up to 18 years after the transplant.

After adjusting for other factors, the researchers concluded that patients who received simultaneous kidney-pancreas transplants had better long-term survival. Beyond 10 years, the risk of death in the kidney-pancreas group was 45 percent lower than in the kidney group.

That improved long-term survival was largely the result of a lower risk of cardiovascular disease -- 37 percent among kidney-pancreas patients compared with 46 percent to 49 percent in kidney-only patients.

"Based on these results, we feel that all type 1 diabetics with kidney failure should be considered for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation," Dr. Christian Morath, of the University of Heidelberg, said in a prepared statement.

The study appears in the August issue of the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

"Our study shows that a functioning pancreas has a benefit for the simultaneously transplanted kidney," Morath said. "At the same time, this procedure prolongs the survival of the patient, compared to a patient who received only a kidney transplant."

Morath said the lower risk of cardiovascular death among kidney-pancreas transplant patients "is most likely due to the [normal blood sugar levels] in patients who received a combined treatment."

The results "show an interaction of different and independent organs -- kidney, pancreas, and heart -- with respect to survival of the patient."

More information

The National Kidney Foundation has more about kidney transplantation.


"you CAN do ALL things through Christ which STRENGTHENS you"
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“I don't believe in failure.”

( this includes getting healthy!!)


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33
?order=1


Randomized Study of Real-Time Continuous Glucose Monitors in the Management of Type 1 Diabetes

This study is ongoing, but not recruiting participants.

Sponsored by: JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project
Information provided by: JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00406133
Purpose

Subjects will be enrolled into the study which consists of two phases:

1. A 6-month randomized trial comparing a real-time continuous glucose monitor (RT-CGM) group with a control group that will use home glucose meter (HGM) monitoring and have the same number of scheduled phone contacts and visits as the RT-CGM group, followed by:
2. A 6-month observational study during which the RT-CGM Group continues to use RT-CGM to evaluate whether any beneficial effect seen in the first 6 months is sustained with longer-term use and less intensive contact and the control group initiates RT-CGM use with less intensive contact after the first month than was provided at initiation of RT-CGM use in the RT-CGM group in phase 1.


Condition Intervention Phase
Type 1 Diabetes
Device: FreeStyle Navigator
Device: DexCom STS
Device: Paradigm or Guardian REAL-Time
Phase II
Phase III

MedlinePlus related topics: Diabetes Type 1

ChemIDplus related topics: Dextrose Methamidophos



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sp?PageID=RESEARCHSUMMARIES_322020


Continuous Glucose Sensor Can Help People With Diabetes Avoid Highs and Lows

Improvement in glycemic excursions with a transcutaneous, real-time continuous glucose sensor: a randomized controlled trial, by S. Garg and colleagues. Diabetes Care 29:44-50, 2006.

What is the problem and what is known about it so far?

Previous research has shown that intense insulin therapy delays and prevents heart and blood vessel problems in people with diabetes. By frequently checking their blood glucose levels, patients with diabetes are better able to monitor their A1C levels (a measure of long-term blood glucose levels) and to adjust their insulin doses to avoid extreme highs and lows in their glucose levels. Unfortunately, many patients who treat their diabetes with insulin don’t like to frequently check their blood glucose levels because doing so is uncomfortable and sometimes inconvenient.
Why did the researchers do this particular study?

Continuous glucose sensors have recently become available for patients with diabetes. These devices give patients the ability to view real-time blood glucose levels, review trends and fluctuations in their recent blood glucose levels, and receive alerts when their blood glucose level will become too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia).

One type of continuous glucose sensor works by wirelessly transmitting glucose readings to a handheld receiver. A wire-like sensor that measures the glucose levels is inserted under the skin and is held in place by an adhesive. Once inserted, the patient wears the sensor for up to three days before replacing it. After three days, the patient simply removes the sensor from the skin and throws it away. A new sensor can then be used with the same receiver.

The researchers of this study wanted to see how accurate, safe, and effective this type of devise was for frequently checking blood glucose levels.
Who was studied?

A total of 91 patients who required insulin to treat their diabetes.
How was the study done?

The patients wore the continuous glucose sensor for three consecutive 3-day periods. All of the patients used two meters -- one for their normal fingerstick measurements and one for the continuous glucose sensor measurements -- but the patients were told to adjust their insulin doses according to their normal fingerstick measurements (not according to the values on the glucose sensor).

One group of patients (the display group) didn't see the glucose sensor measurements in the first period, but in the second and third periods, they were able to view real-time blood glucose levels, review trends and fluctuations in their recent blood glucose levels, and receive alerts when their blood glucose level would become too high or too low. The other group (the control group) wasn't able to see the glucose sensor readings during any of the three periods, and they didn't receive any alerts at all.

The researchers compared the different meter readings and monitored the blood glucose levels of the patients.
What did the researchers find?

About 95% of the glucose sensor readings were considered to be accurate when compared with the fingerstick meter readings.

The display group, or the patients who were able to use the glucose sensor in the second and third periods, spent 21% less time as hypoglycemic (blood glucose levels too low), 23% less time as hyperglycemic (blood glucose levels too high), and 26% more time in the target glucose range, as compared to patients in the control group.
What were the limitations of the study?

The improvements in glucose fluctuations could be because the patients were in frequent contact with the medical personnel who conducted this short 10-day study. Patients tend to monitor their glucose levels better when they know they’re being monitored.
What are the implications of the study?

Real-time monitoring of blood glucose levels, for periods up to 3 days, is safe, reliable, and effective for people who use insulin to treat their diabetes. Using this type of continuous monitoring system enables patients to avoid highs and lows in their blood glucose levels, which helps prevent diabetes complications.

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tent/abstract/117/6/2132
Feasibility and Safety of Insulin Pump Therapy in Children Aged 2 to 7 Years With Type 1 Diabetes: A Retrospective Study
Tseghai Berhe, MD, MS, FAAPa,b, Daniel Postellon, MDb, Bruce Wilson, MDb and Roberta Stone, RD, CDEb

a Section of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Pediatrics, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois
b DeVos Children's Hospital Diabetes Center (Spectrum Health), Grand Rapids, Michigan

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES. Although insulin pump therapy has been successful in adults, adolescents and school children, its use has been limited in young children. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the glycemic control, safety and efficacy of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion via pump in young children (2–7 years old) with type 1 diabetes who were transitioned from twice-a-day insulin injection (neutral protamine Hagedorn/Lente + Humalog/Novalog) to insulin pump therapy. Hemoglobin A1c, BMI, average fasting blood glucose, episodes of severe hypoglycemia, episodes of diabetic ketoacidosis, episodes of lipohypertrophy, blood glucose variability, and number of sick day calls were compared before and after insulin pump therapy.

METHODS. Data were collected retrospectively by chart review over a 2-year period during quarterly diabetes clinic visits from 33 patients who were managed on neutral protamine Hagedorn/Lente + Humalog/Novolog twice-a-day injections for at least 1 year prior to transitioning to insulin pump therapy.

RESULTS. There was a significant improvement in the average hemoglobin A1c after continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The average fasting blood sugar was lower in the continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion group. Severe episodes of hypoglycemia and episodes of lipohypertrophy were significantly higher before insulin pump therapy initiation. There were significantly fewer sick day calls after continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Blood sugar variability improved significantly after insulin pump therapy. There was no significant difference in BMI or amount of carbohydrate consumed. None of the patients experienced diabetic ketoacidosis requiring emergency treatment before or after insulin pump therapy.

CONCLUSIONS. Continous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy in young children with type 1 diabetes is a safe, effective and superior alternative to a twice-a-day insulin regimen.

Edited by: YERACHMIEL at: 4/16/2008 (21:02)
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www.isletsofhope.com/diabetes/treatm
en
t/insulin_pump_studies_1.html#2005


Insulin Pump Therapy
Insulin Pump Studies for the Years 2000 Through 2005


The news is coming in and it's good... insulin pump therapy is safe and effective even for infants and young children! It is important that patients selected for pump use be ideal candidates. Not everyone is well-suited for pump use. But when good candidates are educated and matched with the pump that best fits their needs, study after study conclude that insulin pump is safe, effective, and has a positive impact on quality of life ... something else that also contributes to improved glycemic control.

Study Year

2005 * 2004 * 2003 * 2002 * 2001 * 2000 * 1996

Howard Wolpert
Smart Pumping: The insulin pump has opened a whole new world for people with diabetes­­more flexibility in what and when they eat and better blood sugar control, too. Smart Pumping integrates this new successful technology with the physical and psychological aspects of diabetes care, and helps patients adopt the insulin pump into their self-care regime. This book combines a comprehensive medical approach toward intensive diabetes management and pump therapy with a patient-centered appreciation of the real-life challenges and frustrations.

Howard Wolpert, M.D., is an instructor in medicine at the Harvard Medical School Joslin Diabetes Center and is also in charge of the pump clinic there. He has written extensively on the use of insulin pumps.
IOH Rating 5/5

Insulin Pump Studies & Information Links

IPump.org - List of studies that support intensive insulin therapy via an insulin pump for the treatment of type 1 diabetes in children.

The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)

Summary of The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial. This summary is an easy-to-read review of the DCCT contains valuable information that can be used for letters to insurance companies to support your interest (and need) for an insulin pump.

Diabetes Monitor: Commentary on the DCCT

Implications of the DCCT - A position statement from the American Diabetes Association

The DCCT - National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disease/NIH

John Walsh
Pumping Insulin: This is a must-read book for anyone on the pump or considering using one. The information is exhuastive and straightforward. Even if you think you know it all about pumping, this book will teach you even more!

"As a young Internist, this book proved to be essential in my understanding of diabetes. Searching through my more commonly used references to include Internal Medicine and Endocrinology Textbooks I was unable to find a concise summary of the information and recommendations necessary to manage my patients with pumps. The 500 rule and the 1800 rule were just vague concepts found in obscure management articles and discussions with other providers. I did not have the benefit of a certified pump trainer or diabetic nurse educator. But with this reference as a guide I was able to develop a management plan. In 3 short months I dropped my patient from a HgBA1C of 9.4 to 6.3. Where there were previous highs in the 400's there are just now slight deviations from desired values. This reference and the bolus wizard on the Medtronic pump is all that one needs to demystify the management. And of course you and your patient needs to be motivated and dedicated. Dr. Daniel Carlson, Germany" IOH Rating 5/5

2005 - Insulin Pump Studies
(Conclusion Provided)

Exercise with and without an insulin pump among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. (25 September 2005). Institute for Endocrinology and Diabetes, National Center for Childhood Diabetes, Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel, Petach Tikva 49202, Israel.

CONCLUSIONS: We found no advantage for subjects with either PO or PF during exercise, and we noted that late hypoglycemia was more common than hypoglycemia during exercise. However, PO was associated with a trend of increased risk for late hypoglycemia. We recommend that the pump be removed or turned off during prolonged exercise and that blood glucose concentrations be monitored for several hours after exercise, regardless of the pump mode.

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion and multiple dose of insulin regimen display similar patterns of blood glucose excursions in pediatric type 1 diabetes. (25 September 2005). Children's Hospital of Wisconsin Diabetes Center, Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA. ralemzad@mcw.edu

CONCLUSIONS: The CSII and MDI regimens in children and adolescents with comparable glycemic control displayed similar patterns of glycemic excursions, implying that factors influencing glycemic instability in pediatric type 1 diabetes mellitus appear to be independent of treatment modality.

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion in toddlers and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus is safe and effective. (27 March 2005). Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

CONCLUSIONS: This study supports CSII as a safe and effective alternative to managing T1DM, with no increase in hypoglycemia and a trend to improve control, even in the youngest patients.

Insulin pump use in young adolescents with type 1 diabetes: a descriptive study. (27 March 2005). Department of Psychology, Bates College, Lewiston, ME 04240, USA. klow@bates.edu

Conclusions: To optimize glycemic control, CSII can be initiated and used effectively, both in children of all ages and in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. CSII may be ideal therapy for toddlers, with no apparent lower age boundary for initiating CSII; however, the parenting challenges and requirements for supportive education differ between toddlers and adolescents. When disease and pump management are appropriately individualized, CSII therapy can help children with diabetes achieve and sustain glycemic control. Lifestyle flexibility, quality-of-life improvement, and independence can thus begin early in childhood and be maintained throughout young adulthood.

Flexible Insulin Therapy Works for Preschoolers, Too. Reported on Diabetes Channel, 05/05/2005. www.isletsofhope.com/diabetes/treatm
en
t/insulin_pump_studies_1.html#2005


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s/Blood_Glucose_Monitoring/Talking_MR>eters

Talking Meters, What’s New?


by Ann S. Williams, Ph.D., R.N., C.D.E.

Self-monitoring of blood glucose is one of the areas of diabetes self-management that is deeply affected by severe visual impairment. When people with diabetes learn they have permanent visual impairment, one of the first questions they often ask a diabetes educator is, “How will I check my blood glucose?”

Many standard meters now have large-print screens, which makes them more accessible for people with enough vision to see large print. However, most of the large-print screens have low contrast between the numbers and the background, limiting their usefulness for many people with moderate to severe visual impairment. And all standard meters currently available require the ability to read large print for at least some essential steps in their use, making them inaccessible for people whose visual impairment is severe enough that they cannot read large print. Fortunately, some manufacturers of blood glucose meters have recognized the need for meters for people who cannot read visual displays. For more than 10 years now, such meters have been available in the United States. And Medicare and most private insurance companies provide coverage for such meters for the people who need them. (See “Insurance Coverage for Talking Meters.”)

In the past couple of years, there have been major changes in the availability of accessible blood glucose meters for people with severe visual impairment. A number of accessible meters are no longer available. One meter that had been available since 1998, the Accu-Chek Voicemate, ceased being produced as of January 1, 2007. Two other meters that could be used with a separate voice attachment, the OneTouch Profile and OneTouch SureStep, are also no longer sold.

However, a variety of both new and familiar meters are on the scene. The OneTouch Basic, its voice attachment, and the Sure Guide (a device that helps place the drop of blood on the strip) are all still sold. And several new lines of talking meters are now available. These new meters are smaller, faster, and less expensive than older choices, and they need only a tiny drop of blood, making them much easier to use accurately.

If you have visual impairment, you may be wondering which of these meters is the best one. The answer is not simple; each person with visual impairment has a slightly different set of needs, and each of the talking meters has somewhat different characteristics. Put simply, the most suitable meter for you is the one that best matches your needs. This article explains some of the different features of the talking meters, so you, your diabetes educator, and your doctor can decide together which one is best for you.

What meter features are important?
People who use talking blood glucose meters need many of the same features in a meter that sighted users need. In addition, they need a few special features that relate to their inability to see. The following list includes questions that should be asked about both types of meter features.

While each question is important to some people, not every question is important to every person who needs a talking meter. As you read the questions, think about which ones are important to you.

* How big is the meter with its integrated voice or its voice attachment? Can it be carried easily in a pocket or purse?
* What is the cost of the meter?
* Where can the meter and strips be purchased?
* Is the meter's voice clear and easy to understand?
* Does the voice speak any language other than English?
* Can the volume be adjusted? Is there an earphone to allow private use in public places?
* If there is a separate voice attachment, does the same company manufacture both the meter and the voice?
* If the voice needed repairs, would it be serviced by the meter company or by a separate company?
* How big are the strips?
* Are the strips easy to handle?
* Is it easy to identify the insertion end of the strip nonvisually?
* Are the strips easy to insert in the meter nonvisually?
* Does the manufacturer provide accessible instructions (recorded instructions, for example) for the use of the meter?
* Does the voice guide the user through all of the steps for a blood glucose check?
* Does the meter require coding? If it does, can it be coded without seeing the code number?
* How large a drop of blood is needed for an accurate test?
* Is it easy to place blood on the right place on the strip nonvisually?
* How long does the procedure for checking blood glucose take?
* Does the meter read the result clearly? Can the user hear the result repeated if necessary?
* Does the meter store the result, date, and time in the memory? If so, how many results can be stored?
* Can the voice repeat information from the meter's memory?
* Can data in the meter's memory be uploaded to a computer?
* Does the meter do anything besides measuring blood glucose levels?



Edited by: YERACHMIEL at: 4/16/2008 (20:46)
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Is Insulin Pump Therapy Better Than Insulin Injection Therapy for Toddlers With Type 1 Diabetes?

A randomly controlled trial of insulin pump therapy in young children with type 1 diabetes, by L.A. Fox and colleagues. Diabetes Care 28:1277-1281, 2005.
www.diabetes.org/diabetes-research/s
um
maries/fox-pump.jsp


What is the problem and what is known about it so far?

For a number of reasons, it's hard to achieve good blood glucose control in infants and toddlers with type 1 diabetes: how infants' bodies will react to insulin is hard to predict, and the eating and activity patterns of young children change often. These things, among others, can lead to widely changing blood glucose levels in infants and toddlers with type 1 diabetes.
Why did the researchers do this particular study?

There isn't much information that compares insulin pump therapy with traditional insulin injection therapy in toddlers and infants. In addition, there's very little information that looks at quality-of-life issues, such as parents' stress levels, among the families of toddlers and infants with type 1 diabetes.

The researchers wanted to see if insulin pump therapy might be better than insulin injection therapy. They designed the study to see whether the use of insulin pump therapy in young children improves diabetes control, lowers the frequency of hypoglycemia (or blood glucose levels that are too low), and improves the family’s quality of life.
Who was studied?

Twenty-six children who had type 1 diabetes for at least 6 months. The children were between 12 and 72 months old.
How was the study done?

The children were given either their usual insulin injection therapy or insulin pump therapy for 6 months. After 6 months, the children on insulin injection therapy were given insulin pump therapy. The researchers measured the children's A1C (a measure of long-term blood glucose control), their average blood glucose level, how many times they had low blood glucose levels, quality-of-life measures, and how parents adjusted to new routines.
What did the researchers find?

Eleven children from each group completed the study. At the beginning of the study, there were no differences in A1C, average blood glucose, the age of the children, the number of boys and girls, how long the children had diabetes, or parental quality of life between the insulin injection and insulin pump groups. Likewise, after 6 months, A1C, average blood glucose, and quality of life were similar between the two groups. A1C and average blood glucose did not change in either group after 6 months, and how many times the children had dangerously low blood glucose, had high blood glucose, and had to go to the hospital was similar between the two groups throughout the study.

Children in the insulin pump group had low blood glucose levels more often, and quality-of-life measures improved among fathers of children in the insulin pump group. Mothers of children in the insulin injection group felt stressed more often during the 6 months.
What were the limitations of the study?

This study looked at only 11 children in each group. The researchers think that a group of 40-60 children is needed to fully compare the effects of these therapies on average blood glucose, A1C, and the likelihood of hypoglycemia.
What are the implications of the study?

In this study, insulin pump therapy was safe and well tolerated in toddlers and young children with type 1 diabetes, and it was just as good as insulin injection therapy for maintaining good diabetes control. More studies are needed, though, to fully examine the benefits of using insulin pump therapy in very young children.


Edited by: YERACHMIEL at: 4/16/2008 (20:32)
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I am going to use this post for us to post news about research and advances in diabetes medicine. So if you guys have any new or articles about type 1 diabetes feel pree to post it in this topic.

"you CAN do ALL things through Christ which STRENGTHENS you"
phil 4:13


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Experimental Treatment For Type 1 Diabetes Patients Shows Promise
Main Category: Diabetes
Also Included In: Endocrinology; Conferences
Article Date: 11 Apr 2008 - 0:00 PDT

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New research monitoring the effects of Islet cell transplantation resulted in near-normal metabolic control and decreased hypoglycemia. This research will be presented at the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) 17th Annual Meeting & Clinical Congress, on Friday, May 16th, at the Walt Disney World Dolphin Resort in Orlando.

During the 18 month study, physicians used Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems to monitor the effects of the islet cell transplant procedure on patients with type 1 diabetes. The results were intriguing.

"Our findings suggest that the majority of patients with Type 1 diabetes who have received an islet transplant benefit from near normal metabolic control, with fewer and shorter episodes of hypoglycemia," said Lisa Gorn, DO, the study's primary author. "These patients also spent longer periods of time in normoglycemia overall.

At the 2008 AACE Annual Meeting diabetes will be taking center stage. A special symposium titled "Clinical Trials Targeting Glycemia: What Do We Expect to Learn?" will consider the impact of glucose control through studies including ACCORD, ADVANCE, VADT, and others. Related sessions of interest include "Insulin Resistance and Atherosclerosis: The Missing Link," and "Hypoglycemia: The Limiting Factor in the Glycemic Management of Diabetes."

American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE)
1000 Riverside Ave., Ste 205
Jacksonville, FL 32204
United States

"you CAN do ALL things through Christ which STRENGTHENS you"
phil 4:13


“I don't believe in failure.”

( this includes getting healthy!!)


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