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WILDHONEYPIE1's Photo WILDHONEYPIE1 Posts: 577
2/24/12 10:07 P

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I just used King Arthur GF multi-purpose flour to make pumpkin bread. It turned out deliciously light and fluffy. (not my best choice for staying on track) I substituted one for one in a standard recipe. KA flour contains rice flour, tapioca starch, potato starch, and whole grain brown rice flour. Not an economical choice, but it works for me as I am forced to bake less. (And as a side note it is processed in soy and nut free facility as well.)

"I like giants. Especially girl giants. 'Cause all girls feel too big sometimes regardless of their size." - from I like Giants, by Kimya Dawson.

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WORKCAT's Photo WORKCAT SparkPoints: (1,880)
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1/18/12 4:25 P

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Making the switch to Kamut and Barley (not entirely gluten free) because I am finding modern wheat a bit hard to digest and I am not entirely convinced that it is healthy.

http://www.rodale.com/wheat-free-diet-0?
cm_mmc=Facebook-_-Rodale-_-Content-Rec
entNews-_-UnhealthyWheat

Edited by: WORKCAT at: 1/18/2012 (17:51)
Determined as heck and not gonna give up


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LINDAF49's Photo LINDAF49 SparkPoints: (58,307)
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4/11/11 12:16 A

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Wow - lots of learning on this thread - will have to start at the beginning and take notes!!

Linda F in WA state
*John 10:10b Jesus came to give me life,
an abundant life!


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HEALTHYBARB1's Photo HEALTHYBARB1 SparkPoints: (115,401)
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2/8/11 12:27 P

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Thanks for the info...Barb

Smiles from Barb!!

"If you want something you've never had...you must do something you've never done!"

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1GRNTHMB's Photo 1GRNTHMB Posts: 4,791
2/8/11 12:24 P

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Barb, What I have been using for Pizza Crust is the Bob's Red Mill Wonderful Gluten Free Bread mix. It makes a very good pizza crust.

Mark
Leader: Gluten Free and Healthy
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HEALTHYBARB1's Photo HEALTHYBARB1 SparkPoints: (115,401)
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2/4/11 6:41 P

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My favorite flour blend is the one Mark listed a few posts ago from Carol Fenster and my favorite cookbook is "1000 gluten free recipes" also from Carol Fenster. I am working on converting all of my old favorite recipes to gluten free and have been pretty successful. I have not really found a pizza crust I like yet and so will continue on the quest. The Gluten free Girl and Chiefs new recipe on their sight looks interesting. Has anyone tried making it or have a flour blend that makes good pizza? Let me know. Have a great day! Smiles Barb

Smiles from Barb!!

"If you want something you've never had...you must do something you've never done!"

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1GRNTHMB's Photo 1GRNTHMB Posts: 4,791
2/2/11 11:02 A

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Mary, So the Sorghum flour has a High Gylcemic index also? I would think it would be better then the white flours. What about Teff flour? I have not tried the bean flours by themselves but there are a lot of recipes that use beans in place of a flour.

Mark
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WEEZYB7881's Photo WEEZYB7881 SparkPoints: (21,573)
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1/29/11 1:32 A

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It was trying all the different flours that I gained all my weight (along with lots of overeating), but as soon as I cut back on my carbs, I started to feel better.

Realize that there is no such thing as failure. Keep this in mind and you will achieve all that you conceive in your mind. You never fail, you simply produce results." - Dr. Wayne Dyer




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SUGARFREEBIE Posts: 183
12/13/10 6:04 P

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Problem with most flours listed is their being very high-glycemic,making them poor choices for anyone with blood sugar issues--had a disaster with commercial English muffins made with tapioca and brown rice flours, so sorghum and potato are out of the question. Tolerate oat just fine; looking for recipes using chickpea flour.
Suggestions welcome

Peace out,
Mary S.


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MARTI2468 Posts: 2
7/24/09 2:37 A

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I should have put the name of the person that the question was directed to. It was Super Duper. But then I noticed how old the post was. emoticon

Oh well. thank you Mark and Elana for responding.

Marti

1GRNTHMB's Photo 1GRNTHMB Posts: 4,791
7/21/09 8:23 P

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I have to agree that Sorghum is my favorite flour. It has really improved the flavor and texture of what I bake. I use cornstarch for all my thickening. I have tried the potato and rice flours for this but did not like the results. The rice flour made everything taste gritty.

Mark
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Co Leader: Ankylosing spondylitis is anky-losing bad habits!
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ELENASAN's Photo ELENASAN Posts: 1,368
7/20/09 7:22 A

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I've found that, when I need a substitute for flour as a thickener, I use potato starch for gravies and cornstarch for desserts and glazes. Potato starch makes a nice smooth, creamy gravy. Cornstarch comes out more gelatinous.

I'm like the others who have trouble finding specialty flours and ingredients, so I've been using mixes.

Elena


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MARTI2468 Posts: 2
7/20/09 3:37 A

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Will you please share your recipe for your flour mix? I am so cheap and simple that for every cup of flour needed I use 1/2 cup brown rice flour, and then mix potato starch flour, tapioca flour and (when I have it ) sorghum to make up a 1/2 cup. Sorghum is my favorite flour to use in this mix, but it is expensive for me. So it is a treat.
Thank you,
Marti
Gluten free for going on 10 years.

1GRNTHMB's Photo 1GRNTHMB Posts: 4,791
4/15/08 12:24 P

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The reason why there are so many different mix combinations is that different authors of the cook books have developed different mixes for different recipes. The often have done a lot of research into coming up with the right mix for each type of recipe.

I was always really disappointed in baking with the standard rice flour blends that were used until recently. When I bought Carol Fenster's Wheat-Free Recipes & More cook book I discovered that I could make really good baked items. The difference is the addition of sorghum and bean flours that she used. These are now the staple in most commercial mixes such as the Bob's Red Mill All Purpose Gluten Free Baking Mix. the follow is the different mixes she has in her book:

Carol's Sorghum-Corn Flour Blend
1 1/2 cups sorghum flour
1 1/2 potato starch or corn starch
1 cup tapioca flour
1/2 cup corn flour

Carol's Bean Flour Blend
2 1/2 cups garbanzo/fava bean flour
3/4 cup potato starch or cornstarch
3/4 cup tapioca flour
1/2 cup sorghum flour

Note: Be careful purchasing corn flour. It is often a blend of wheat and corn. It is best to make your own by purchasing white corn-meal and grind it in a coffee grinder.

I agree that commercial mixes can be more expensive but I sometimes have difficulty finding some of the ingredients locally (such as sorghum flour). So the commercial mixes have there place.

Mark
Use cornstarch when you want a crispy texture and potato starch when you want a smoother, lighter texture.

Mark
Leader: Gluten Free and Healthy
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Co Leader: Ankylosing spondylitis is anky-losing bad habits!
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SEASELKIE's Photo SEASELKIE Posts: 78
4/3/08 1:20 P

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SUPERDUPER26- Can you tell me which flours you mix together to make your mix and approximate quantities? I am new to this whole no-gluten thing and I have a large family to feed, so the Bob's Mix is too spendy for me. I bake a lot and really need an all-purpose mix. Thanks!

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GINGERLEMONGIRL Posts: 7
3/31/08 3:21 P

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Superduper -- I think it just depends on how much you like to experiment and bake gluten free. I don't mind having a lot of different flours on hand and I have do have a general mix for many of the things I bake like pancakes and biscuits...

But for most of my baking, I usually gear the flours towards the recipe I have in mind. For instance, if I'm baking something with chocolate I'll use different flours than when I'm baking something that is lighter in taste and texture.

I think it all depends on taste. I personally like to use many different kinds of flours, although the flours I use most often are brown rice, millet, sorghum, tapioca, and gluten free certified oat flour.

Edited by: GINGERLEMONGIRL at: 4/3/2008 (13:41)
SUPERDUPER26's Photo SUPERDUPER26 Posts: 1,553
3/31/08 2:55 P

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I disagree with GingerLemonGirl, and I have one super all purpose flour mix and I use it for EVERYTHING! I had a couple of cookbooks, and each book had its own "recipe" for flour, and since I got tired of keeping the different flours for different books, I made a batch of each and dumped them all together. I now have a psuedo flour mixture made of rice/sorghum/tapioca/potato/corn starch that I have not had any problems with. I have used it in cookies, cakes, pancakes, sauces, etc. The only thing to be aware of is whether or not there is Xanthan Gum in the flour, or if you need to add it separately to the recipe. The important part is that you don't get good results with just one kind of flour, you have to mis a few of them together to get good food, but I'm convinced that the exact types and amounts of which particular flour are unimportant.
Because I'm inherently cheap, I won't buy the premixed flour mixes (Bob's Redmill and such) because they are so much more expensive. I think that the sorghum based flours have a slightly better texture than rice based, but the rice is cheaper and so I use it more. It might take a little longer to mix up my own flour, but I make a giant batch every few months and put it in a big 20-cup rubbermaid tub and then its both cheap and easy.
Thats my 2 cents worth....


Edited by: SUPERDUPER26 at: 3/31/2008 (14:56)
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GINGERLEMONGIRL Posts: 7
3/24/08 3:53 P

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Gluten free baking can be tricky. Unfortunately you cannot just pick and choose any gluten free flour, be it brown rice flour, white rice flour, sorghum flour, aramanth flour, tapioca flour, GF certified oat flour, etc... All of these flours work differently and you have to find a mix that works for your tastes. I have a gluten free all purpose master baking mix on my website that is great for quick breads and meals. You might want to try it.

gingerlemongirl.blogspot.com/2008/02
/s
uccessful-gluten-free-master-baking.R>html


I also have several good bread recipes on my site that give general references to the gluten free flours I prefer.

Generally I use a mix of brown rice flour, tapioca flour, and then I use GF certified oat flour, millet flour, or sorghum flour depending on the recipe I'm making.

Sorghum flour has a noticable earthy taste, but works very well in chocolate baked goods, or other dark baked goods.

Millet flour is a light tasting, but very healthy flour that I really LOVE and I'm using it very often now. I think it is very similar to wheat flour in texture and taste. It blends well with other flours!

GF certified oat flour, I make myself in my blender using GF certified oats that I buy from Bob's Red Mill.

If you have a certain recipe you'd like help with as far as what flours to use, please email me or visit my website!

www.gingerlemongirl.com

Edited by: GINGERLEMONGIRL at: 4/3/2008 (13:41)
GINGERLEMONGIRL Posts: 7
3/24/08 3:51 P

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Gluten free baking can be tricky. Unfortunately you cannot just pick and choose any gluten free flour, be it brown rice flour, white rice flour, sorghum flour, aramanth flour, tapioca flour, GF certified oat flour, etc... All of these flours work differently and you have to find a mix that works for your tastes. I have a gluten free all purpose master baking mix on my website that is great for quick breads and meals. You might want to try it.

gingerlemongirl.blogspot.com/2008/02
/s
uccessful-gluten-free-master-baking.R>html


I also have several good bread recipes on my site that give general references to the gluten free flours I prefer.

Generally I use a mix of brown rice flour, tapioca flour, and then I use GF certified oat flour, millet flour, or sorghum flour depending on the recipe I'm making.

Sorghum flour has a noticable earthy taste, but works very well in chocolate baked goods, or other dark baked goods.

Millet flour is a light tasting, but very healthy flour that I really LOVE and I'm using it very often now. I think it is very similar to wheat flour in texture and taste. It blends well with other flours!

GF certified oat flour, I make myself in my blender using GF certified oats that I buy from Bob's Red Mill.

If you have a certain recipe you'd like help with as far as what flours to use, please email me or visit my website!

www.gingerlemongirl.com

1GRNTHMB's Photo 1GRNTHMB Posts: 4,791
3/4/08 7:16 P

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I have had really good luck using the Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free All purpose Flour Mix. Using it as a replacement for the flour called for in normal recipes. It is a sorghum, bean, rice, tapioca, cornstarch blend. I think that the sorghum/bean based flours come out much better then the rice/potato/tapioca mixes used in most products. None of the health food stores near me have sorghum flour so I am stuck buying premade mixes. I know the Bob's mix makes really good brownies but it is to heavy to use for cakes.

Mark

Mark
Leader: Gluten Free and Healthy
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Co Leader: Ankylosing spondylitis is anky-losing bad habits!
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SINGINGSIREN82's Photo SINGINGSIREN82 Posts: 125
1/20/08 1:05 A

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I didn't see any in the book, but I did find some online - and then our city just opened a health food store (sprouts to be exact) right down the street that had a lot of the flours for my recipes - and an all purpose mix. I'm stoked. I made pumpkin cookes for the first time and it had tapioca, bean, and sorghum flour - they weren't too bad!

The scale doesn't define your beauty; it's the heart that truly matters.

1 Corinthians 6:19-20
"19 Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; 20 you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body." (NIV)


 
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DOTSLADY's Photo DOTSLADY Posts: 10,018
1/18/08 3:45 A

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I remember Heather's name, but am not familiar with the book. Baking is such an science, and I'm no gf flour alchemist. If you can afford it, I would just pick a few recipes and buy the flour for them and experiment; meaning I can't suggest anything different without worrying about the outcome of the recipe (I could share other flour mixtures for "all-purpose" if you want. Did the authors of your book do that?)

KNOWLEDGE = POWER. BODY = TEMPLE. FOOD = MEDICINE. PREVENTION IS THE CURE. YOU ARE WHAT YOU ABSORB!
One person's food is another person's poison.
__________
Celiac Disease: An autoimmune reaction from eating gluten grains: wheat, rye, barley and contaminated oats=nutrient deficiency=cancer. Have 1 of 300 symptoms? bit.ly/cdsymptoms
CD stories: bit.ly/cdstories
Nutrition/Cancer: bit.ly/Quillinnutrition


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SINGINGSIREN82's Photo SINGINGSIREN82 Posts: 125
1/18/08 2:02 A

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I got the Complete Gluten Free Cookbook by Donna Washburn & Heather Butt

The scale doesn't define your beauty; it's the heart that truly matters.

1 Corinthians 6:19-20
"19 Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; 20 you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body." (NIV)


 
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DJ4HEALTH's Photo DJ4HEALTH Posts: 39,825
1/18/08 1:13 A

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I would suggest that you make a small batch and taste how it is and then decide if the taste is what you want.

Dorothy





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DOTSLADY's Photo DOTSLADY Posts: 10,018
1/17/08 3:59 P

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Most gf recipe books have an "all-purpose" recipe to use as an "all-purpose" substitute. They usually tell you which type of flours "work" for a particular type of baking or suchnot. Sometimes if you're baking you might not want a bean-based flavor/taste for example.

Which book did you get?

KNOWLEDGE = POWER. BODY = TEMPLE. FOOD = MEDICINE. PREVENTION IS THE CURE. YOU ARE WHAT YOU ABSORB!
One person's food is another person's poison.
__________
Celiac Disease: An autoimmune reaction from eating gluten grains: wheat, rye, barley and contaminated oats=nutrient deficiency=cancer. Have 1 of 300 symptoms? bit.ly/cdsymptoms
CD stories: bit.ly/cdstories
Nutrition/Cancer: bit.ly/Quillinnutrition


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SINGINGSIREN82's Photo SINGINGSIREN82 Posts: 125
1/17/08 3:51 P

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Ok, I bought a gluten free cook book and there are about 12 different types of flours through out the book (rice / bean / oat / potato). If I was going to make a "normal" recipe, but replace the flour in that one with a gluten free friendly flower, how would I know what to use? Or could I even use it?

The scale doesn't define your beauty; it's the heart that truly matters.

1 Corinthians 6:19-20
"19 Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; 20 you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your body." (NIV)


 
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