Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.
 

team5214forum


  Team Forum
Waist Management Team

A Guide to Posting in Your SparkTeam Forum

  FORUM:   Spark Tips, Tricks and Challenges
TOPIC:   Spice Up Your Life 


Search
Reply Create A New Topic Subscribe to this Discussion
Advertisement -- Learn more about ads on this site.


 
Author: Message: Sorting Last Post on Top


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
4/18/11 7:32 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Spice Up Your Health Posted By Dr. Mercola

Your favorite marinades may provide a beneficial source of natural antioxidants, according to a new study by researchers at The University of Western Ontario. After analyzing seven popular brands of marinade that contained herbs and spices as their primary ingredients, they found “very good quantities” of antioxidants remained, even after cooking and marinating.

Although marinating meat reduced antioxidants levels by 45-70 percent, there was still a benefit over cooking meat plain, with no marinade.

Consumers can help boost their intake of antioxidants by choosing sauces with the highest levels of antioxidants to begin with, according to researchers. “Foods rich in antioxidants play an essential role in preventing cardiovascular diseases, cancers, neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, inflammation and problems associated with cutaneous aging,” Science Daily reported.

Set up a good herb and spice cabinet and season your food liberally, and you could potentially double or even triple the medicinal value of your meal! This is especially true if you use spices on food you intend to eat raw, as cooking reduced the spices’ antioxidant levels by 45-70 percent in the above study.

Still, even in the above study, which used store-bought sauces and marinades (which I don’t recommend because most contain high fructose corn syrup and other unhealthy additives), the researchers found “very good quantities” of antioxidants from the spices contained therein. Since most herbs offer the greatest benefits in their unprocessed state, if you use high-quality spices directly, you’re likely to get an even greater antioxidant benefit.

According to this study, the top 10 most potent herbs and spices are: Cloves (ground); Cinnamon (ground), Jamaican allspice (ground); Apple pie spice (mixture); Oregano (ground); Pumpkin pie spice (mixture); Marjoram; Sage; Thyme; Gourmet Italian spice

articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archiv
e/2010/04/15/spice-up-your-health.aspx




 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/27/11 9:56 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Cinnamon: Help for Insulin Resistance and Weight Loss
Popular and Flavorful Spice is New Aid in the Battle Against Buddha Belly/Belly Fat

Cinnamon, it turns out, has long been used to cure everything from athlete’s foot to indigestion. Early civilizations recognized its ability to stop bacterial growth. The Egyptians used it in embalming. During the Middle Ages, it was mixed with cloves and warm water, and placed in the sick rooms of victims of the Bubonic Plague.

Recent research indicates that cinnamon can have favorable effects on brain function. Participants in a study chewed cinnamon gum or smelled the sweet spice. Cognitive tests revealed that subjects who used cinnamon had better memory functions and could process information more quickly. Encouraged by these findings, scientists will now conduct studies to see if cinnamon will improve mental skills in the elderly and those prone to anxiety before testing.

That antiseptic power of the spice could also account for a couple of other medical applications for cinnamon. A Japanese study suggests it can not only soothe the stomach, it may even help prevent ulcers. German research claims cinnamon “suppresses completely” the bacteria that causes urinary tract infections and the fungus associated with yeast infections as well.

Recent headlines about cinnamon are the result of an accidental finding in a Maryland USDA research center. Incredibly, the catalyst was as American as good old apple pie, flavored with -- what else -- cinnamon. Scientists were testing the effects of various foods on blood sugar (glucose) levels. They expected the classic pie to have an adverse effect, but instead they found it actually helped lower blood glucose levels.

Want to try cinnamon, there are many tasty and simple ways you can enjoy this aromatic spice.

* Steep your favorite herbal tea with a cinnamon stick adds flavor to the tea
* Add one-half teaspoon of cinnamon to unsweetened applesauce
* Add cinnamon to your breakfast cereal or oatmeal
* Sprinkle on toast
* Adding cinnamon to butter or cream cheese
* Sprinkle cinnamon on your morning cup of coffee, cocoa or cappuccino

Cinnamon also combines very favorably with many baked fruits like peaches and apples as well as fruit juices and ciders.

www.thyroid-info.com/articles/cinnamon.htm




 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/23/11 5:22 P

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Feel-Good Scents

There's no magic in peppermint or cinnamon. But for some reason, smelling pleasant fragrances just makes us feel good. And that, in turn, may boost alertness.

If singing along to the Beach Boys isn't keeping you stimulated, bust out some minty mints or a stick of cinnamon gum. Or pick up an air diffuser for your car -- one that plugs into the cigarette lighter and has essential-oil inserts.

Bumping up your get-it-done quotient at work. The scent of peppermint is like a drill sergeant, telling your brain to "Wake up and focus!" New research shows that you pay better attention to dull-but-must-do jobs when this scent is around. So the next time you're mentally sluggish, grab a candy cane, chew a stick of peppermint gum, or inhale the scent of mint-infused oil, and then listen to your brain say, "Can do!"





 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


TLCFME
TLCFME's Photo Posts: 1,413
3/2/11 7:35 P

TLCFME's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for the info on coriander. Maybe I will make my own spice shaker with my own version of curry powder. Interesting thread. Thank you.emoticonemoticonemoticon


A Smile a day keeps the pink in your petals!


 current weight: 202.0 
 
215
202.5
190
177.5
165


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/2/11 7:32 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Create Your Own Spice Shakers

Making your own herb combinations will save you time (and money) when making recipes. Plus, a homemade spice shaker with a handwritten label makes a wonderful holiday gift for your favorite cook! Try making your own blends (like a simple "Italian Blend" of basil and oregano), or use the suggestions below.

(Mix all ingredients well and place into a shaker with a secure lid.)

Basic Spice Shaker

1 Tbsp. ground marjoram
1 Tbsp. ground savory
1 Tbsp. ground thyme
1-1/2 tsp. ground basil
1-1/2 tsp. ground black pepper
1-1/2 tsp. ground oregano


Herb & Onion Blend

1/4 cup instant chopped onion
1 Tbsp. sweet basil
1 Tbsp. ground cumin
1 Tbsp. garlic powder
1 Tbsp. cracked black pepper

Enhanced Seasoning

1 tsp. crumbled thyme leaves
1 tsp. marjoram leaves
1 tsp. celery seed
1 tsp. garlic powder
1/2 tsp. onion powder
1/2 tsp. curry powder
1/2 tsp. dried dill weed
2 Tbsp. paprika

www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutrition_art
icles.asp?id=520




 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
2/5/11 7:36 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Coriander is probably native to the Middle East and southern Europe. It is found wild in Egypt and the Sudan, and sometimes in English fields. It is referred to in the Bible in the books of Exodus and Numbers, where the colour of ‘manna’ is compared to coriander. It was introduced to Britain by the Romans, who used it in cookery and medicine, and was widely used in English cookery until the Renaissance, when the new exotic spices appeared. Among ancient doctors, coriander was known to Hippocratic.

Spice Description
Coriander is the seed of a small plant. The seeds are almost spherical, one end being slightly pointed, the other slightly flattened. There are many longitudinal ridges. The length of the seed is 3 - 5 mm (1/8” - 3/16”) and the colour, when dried, is usually brown, but may be green or off white. The seed is generally sold dried. Coriander is available both whole and ground. The fresh leaves of the plant are called cilantro and are used as an herb.

Bouquet: Seeds are sweet and aromatic when ripe. The leaves have a distinctive fragrance.
Flavour: The seeds are warm, mild and sweetish. There is a citrus undertone similar to orange peel. The leaves combine well with many pungent dishes from India, Mexico and the Middle East.

The commonest use of coriander seed is in curry powder.



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


TLCFME
TLCFME's Photo Posts: 1,413
2/4/11 12:34 P

TLCFME's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
My favorite is coriander!!! Would like to know more about coriander and cumin. emoticonemoticonemoticon


A Smile a day keeps the pink in your petals!


 current weight: 202.0 
 
215
202.5
190
177.5
165


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
2/4/11 5:23 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
What is your favorite spice, one you would like to know more about or find interesting? Is there a spice you want to try but haven't had the nerve?

Xana



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


TLCFME
TLCFME's Photo Posts: 1,413
2/4/11 4:05 A

TLCFME's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Very interesting thread. Can we get it going again? emoticon


A Smile a day keeps the pink in your petals!


 current weight: 202.0 
 
215
202.5
190
177.5
165


KATHYS1944
KATHYS1944's Photo Posts: 5,416
11/8/10 8:27 A

Send Private Message
Reply
Cumin

There is a great White Chicken Chili recipe at:

kalynskitchen.blogspot.com/2010/02/recipe-
for-amys-amazing-white-chicken.html


This is so yummy and its the 1st time I used cumin!

my.sparkpeople.com/KATHYS1944

"Never, never, never, never give up"
Winston Churchill

Kathy from Wisconsin


 Pounds lost: 12.4 
 
0
19.75
39.5
59.25
79


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
10/30/10 7:59 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
10/7/10 7:43 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Here are five ingredients that not only add flavor to your favorite dishes but can help in your battle against the bulge.

1. Cinnamon - a study showed that as little as one teaspoon of cinnamon per day can boost the body’s weight-loss ability by reducing blood sugar and promoting healthier processing of carbohydrates. It also lowers LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) by seven to 27% and total cholesterol by 12 to 26%

2. Cayenne - Many think that cayenne pepper promotes weight loss because it’s simply difficult to overindulge in spicy food. However, later studies found that the spice increases fat oxidation and stimulates activity by the sympathetic nervous system — all which help the body to shed excess weight. Research found that cayenne’s ability to reduce appetite is equally effective whether ingested as food or in capsule form.

3. Black Pepper - Among the dozens of health benefits of this common household ingredient is its ability to improve digestion and promote the absorption of nutrients in tissues all over the body. Plus, its main component—piperine (which gives pepper its pungent taste)—boosts fat metabolism by as much as 8% for several hours after ingesting it. If you want your pepper to pack the most punch, use freshly ground pepper, which has the most concentrated amounts of piperine.

4. Mustard Seed - Like the other hot ingredients on this list, spicy mustard helps boost metabolism and allows you to burn fat more quickly, thanks in part to its thermogenic properties. Scientists recently found that eating just one teaspoon of hot mustard can boost metabolism 20 to 25% for several hours after eating, resulting in an additional burn of about 45 calories if a 700-calorie meal is consumed.

5. Ginger - Long used for its medicinal properties, ginger is also an effective diuretic (a substance that increases the elimination of urine). It improves gastric mobility (i.e. it pushes food and waste through the digestive system) and hinders the absorption of cholesterol. Preliminary evidence suggests that this versatile spice helps to increase metabolism.



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
9/24/10 7:08 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Savory

Satureja Hortensis
Satureja Montana
Fam: Labiatae (mint)

The primary use of savory is in cooking, and the two savories were among the strongest cooking herbs available to Europeans until world exploration and trade brought them tropical spices like black pepper. The savories have been used to enhance the flavour of food for over 2,000 years. Savory is an herb so bold and peppery in flavour that since the time of the Saxons it has come to denote not only the herb itself, but is synonymous with tasty and flavourful foods.

Savory has a reputation as an aphrodisiac.

Savory's wonderfully distinct piquancy brings an agreeable tasty element to relatively mild foods without overpowering them. The classic blend fines herbes and the traditional bunch of herbs for casseroles, bouquet garni will often contain savory. Savory complements egg dishes, whether chopped finely and added to scrambled eggs and omelets, or treated as a garnish with parsley. Beans, lentils and peas all benefit from the addition of savory in almost any situation. Its robust flavor holds up well in long, slow-cooked dishes such as soups and stews. Savory combines well with breadcrumbs for stuffings.

Most commonly used as a seasoning for green vegetables, savory's special affinity is for beans. Use summer savory, with its more delicate flavour, for tender baby green beans, and winter savory to enhance a whole medley of dried beans and lentils. It is no coincidence that the German word for the herb is Bohenkraut, meaning bean herb, as one of the components of the herb naturally aids the digestion of these sometimes problematic legumes.



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
9/10/10 1:07 P

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
The Health Benefits of Common Spices, Including Black Pepper, Cinnamon, and Cayenne

Black pepper improves digestion by stimulating the taste buds and thereby alerting the stomach to increase hydrochloric secretion. Black pepper is also an antioxidant, and it has antibacterial effects. But wait - there's more! You will be very happy to know that the outermost layer of the peppercorn actually helps stimulate the breakdown of fat cells!

Cinnamon also has a very healthy dose of manganese, but the health benefits of cinnamon are different than those of black pepper. Cinnamon can help eliminate and prevent the clumping of blood platelets. The scent of cinnamon can boost brain function - in other words, smelling cinnamon can improve your virtual recognition memory, working memory, and more!

Cinnamon can also help stop the growth of bacteria. Some even say that cinnamon can be used as spicy alternative to traditional food preservatives. For people with type 2 diabetes, cinnamon is wonderful - it can help them respond to insulin and thereby normalize their blood sugar levels.

The list of benefits from cayenne pepper seems to go on and on: it fights inflammation, prevents stomach ulcers, boosts immunity, offers pain relief, has cardiovascular benefits, and helps clear congestion. It seems that no matter your ailment, a dose of cayenne will help you out! Cayenne is also full of vitamin A.

http://ezinearticles.com/?The-Health-Benefits-of-Common-Spices,-Including-Black-Pepper,-Cinnamon,-and-Cayenne&id=193533



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
6/30/08 9:51 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I see this used on some cooking shows, I didn't know what it was and haven't tried it.

Herbes De Provence Spice Mix

3 tablespoons dried marjoram
1 teaspoon dried rosemary
3 tablespoons dried thyme
1/2 teaspoon dried sage
3 tablespoons dried savory
1/2 teaspoon fennel seeds
1 teaspoon dried basil

Combine all ingredients. Mix well and spoon into small jars. Makes 3/4 cup Spice Mix.




 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
5/27/08 6:31 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Sorry, this is not a spice but ...

Pillsbury Doughboy

Sad News

Please join in remembering a great icon of the
entertainment community.

The Pillsbury Dough boy died yesterday of a yeast
infection and trauma complications from repeated
pokes in the belly. He was 71.

Dough boy was buried in a lightly greased coffin.
Dozens of celebrities turned out to pay their respects, including Mrs. Butterworth, Hungry Jack, the California Raisins, Betty Crocker, the Hostess Twinkies, and Captain Crunch. The grave site was piled high with flours.

Aunt Jemima delivered the eulogy and lovingly
described Dough boy as a man who never knew how much he was kneaded. Dough boy rose quickly
in show business, but his later life was filled with
turnovers.

He was not considered a very smart cookie, wasting
much of his dough on half-baked schemes. Despite being a little flaky at times he still was a crusty old man and was considered a positive roll model for millions.

Dough boy is survived by his wife Play Dough, two
children, John Dough and Jane Dough, plus they had one in the oven.

He is also survived by his elderly father, Pop Tart. The funeral was held at 3:50 for about 20 minutes.

If this made you smile for even a brief second, please rise to the occasion and take time to pass it on and share that smile with someone else who may be having a crumby day and kneads it.



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
4/15/08 3:15 P

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Arrowroot

General Description
Arrowroot is a white powder extracted from the root of a West Indian plant, Marantha arundinacea. It looks and feels like cornstarch.
Geographical Sources
Arrowroot is grown in Brazil and Thailand
Traditional Ethnic Uses
Arrowroot is used as a thickening agent for sauces, fruit pie fillings and glazes, and puddings.
Taste and Aroma
Arrowroot has no flavor.
History/Region of Origin
Arrowroot is indigenous to the West Indies, where native people, the Arawaks, used the powder. The Arawaks used the substance to draw out toxins from people wounded by poison arrows. Its name is thought to be derived from that practice.
A Few Ideas to Get You Started
Arrowroot mixtures thicken at a lower temperature than mixtures made with flour or cornstarch. Mix Arrowroot with cool liquids before adding hot liquids, then cook until mixture thickens. Remove immediately to prevent mixture from thinning. Two teaspoons of Arrowroot can be substituted for 1 tablespoon of cornstarch. One teaspoon of Arrowroot can be substituted for 1 tablespoon of flour. Arrowroot makes clear, shimmering fruit gels and prevents ice crystals from forming in homemade ice cream.





 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
4/14/08 7:18 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Allspice
Pimenta dioica
syn: Pimenta officinalis, Eugenia pimenta
Fam: Myrataceae

Allspice takes its name from its aroma, which smells like a combination of spices, especially cinnamon, cloves, ginger and nutmeg. In much of the world, allspice is called pimento because the Spanish mistook the fruit for black pepper, which the Spanish called pimienta. This is especially confusing since the Spanish had already called chillies pimientos. Lets also thank the Spanish for centuries of linguistic confusion created by naming all the natives they met ‘Indians’.
Allspice is the only spice that is grown exclusively in the Western Hemisphere. The evergreen tree that produces the allspice berries is indigenous to the rainforests of South and Central America where it grows wild. Unfortunately the wild trees were cut down to harvest the berries and few remain today. There are plantations in Mexico and parts of Central America but the finest allspice comes from Jamaica where the climate and soil are best suited to producing the aromatic berries.
Allspice was used by the Mayans as an embalming agent and by other South American Indians to flavour chocolate. The name ‘Jamaica’ comes from Xamayca, meaning ‘land of wood and water’ in the language of the Arawaks. These natives used allspice to help cure and preserve meats, sometimes animals, sometimes their enemies. The allspice cured meat was known in Arawak as boucan and so later Europeans who cured meat this way came to be known as boucaniers, which ultimately became ‘buccaneers’.
The spice was imported to Europe soon after the discovery of the new world. There were several attempts made to transplant it to spice producing regions of the east, but these trees produced little fruit. Despite its rich fragrance and a strong flavour resembling other more coveted spices, allspice never had the same caché in Europe as cinnamon or pepper. The English started making regular shipments to England in 1737, but by that time the lust for spices been eclipsed by other New-World products like sugar and coffee. It was quite popular in England though, where it came to be known as ‘English Spice”.
In the Napoleonic war of 1812, Russian soldiers put allspice in their boots to keep their feet warm and the resultant improvement in odours is carried into today’s cosmetic industries, where pimento oil is usually associated with men’s toiletries (especially products with the word ‘spice’ on the label).

Spice Description
Dried allspice berries resemble large brown peppercorns. Unripe berries are harvested and sun dried until the seeds in them rattle. They vary in size between 4 to 7 mm (1/8 - 1/4 in) in diameter and are dark brown with wrinkled skins. The outer case contains two dark, hard kidney-shaped seeds. Allspice is available whole or ground. Sometimes the whole berry will be called ‘pimento’.
Bouquet: pungent and aromatic, like a combination of nutmeg, clove , ginger and cinnamon.
Flavour: warm and sweetly pungent like the combination described above with peppery overtones.
Hotness Scale: 4

Preparation and Storage
Whole dried allspice will keep indefinitely when kept out of light in airtight jars. It can be ground in a spice mill or an electric coffee grinder. The ground spice loses flavour quickly.

Culinary Uses
Jerked meats like pork, chicken and kid reflect the Spanish/Jamaican background of Allspice. It is a particularly popular spice in European cooking, an important ingredient in many marinades, pickling and mulling spices. Many patés, terrines, smoked and canned meats include allspice. A few allspice berries are added to Scandinavian pickled herring, to Sauerkraut , pickles, soups, game dishes and English spiced beef. Traditionally, allspice has been used in cakes, fruit pies, puddings ice cream and pumpkin pie. Some Indian curries and pilaus contain allspice and in the Middle East it is used in meat and rice dishes. It is also used in liqueurs, notably Benedictine and Chartreuse.
Allspice can be used as a substitute, measure, for measure, for cinnamon, cloves or nutmeg. Conversely to make a substitution for allspice, combine one part nutmeg with two parts each of cinnamon and cloves.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
Because of its eugenol content, allspice has attributes similar to clove. It is a digestive and carminative. The oil is classed as rubefacient, meaning that it irritates the skin and expands the blood vessels, increasing the flow of blood to make the skin feel warmer. The tannins in allspice provide a mild anesthetic that, with its warming effect, make it a popular home remedy for arthritis and sore muscles, used either as a poultice or in hot baths.

Plant Description and Cultivation
A tropical evergreen tree, growing 7 -13m (22-43 ft) in height. It has smooth grey bark, with elliptic, glossy leaves, dark green and glossy, up to 15 cm (6 in) long. It has small white flowers appearing in mid summer followed by green berries that turn purple when ripe. Trees are planted about 10m (30 ft ) apart, allowing room for a full canopy of fruit-bearing branches. Fruit starts to develop after about five years, and becomes full-bearing after twenty years.
These plantations are not called orchards, but ‘walks” and in the summer, when whole trees are blanketed in aromatic flowers, the ‘pimento walk’ was a stroll through the grounds. The botanist Patrick Browne wrote in 1755: “nothing can be more delicious than the odour of these walks, when the trees are in bloom, as well as other times; the friction of the leaves and small branches even in a gentle breeze diffusing a most exhilarating scent.
Berries are picked when they have reached full size, but before they can ripen. The height of the trees makes mechanizing the process difficult, so hand picking or pulling off branches is still common. Berries are then ‘sweat’ for a few days, then they are spread out on a concrete platform called a ‘barbeque’ where they are dried. Leaves from the male trees are also harvested for eugenol oil.

Other Names
English Spice, Jamaica Pepper, Clove Pepper, Myrtle Pepper, Pimenta, Pimento
French: pimenta, tout-épice
German: Jamikapfefer
Italian: pimento
Spanish: pimiento de Jamaica
Indian: kabab cheene, seetful



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
4/10/08 5:38 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I recieved sparkmail from Deb Smith that I would like to share:

Cinnamon is more than just a simple spice. It has the ability to control hunger, zip up your metabolism a bit and helps diabetics process insulin more efficiently. Research has shown that cinnamon can cut blood sugar levels by as much as 20 to 30 percent. Further, it has a natural appetite suppressant quality and may help increase your body’s production of muscle mass. Do you love that? But wait there’s more…cinnamon may help lower your cholesterol levels anywhere from 10 to 30%.

Is that cool or what? But here’s the kicker—cinnamon can also help tame your sugar cravings! Now whaddaya say we get some cinnamon going for breakfast this week?
Deb

So the spice of the day is:

Cinnamon
Cinnamomum zeylanicum
Fam: Lauracae

Cinnamon is the inner bark of a tropical evergreen tree. There are many different species, between 50 and 250, depending on which botanist you choose to believe. The two main varieties are Cinnamomum cassia and Cinnamomum zeylanicum. The first, cassia, we will consider separately in its own section. C. zeylanicum is also known as Ceylon cinnamon (the source of the its Latin name, zeylanicum), or ‘true cinnamon’ which is a lighter colour and possessing a sweeter, more delicate flavour than cassia. A native of Sri Lanka (formerly Ceylon) the best cinnamon grows along the coastal strip near Colombo.
In ancient Egypt cinnamon was used medicinally and as a flavouing for beverages, It was also used in embalming, where body cavities were filled with spiced preservatives. In the ancient world cinnamon was more precious than gold. This is not too surprising though, as in Egypt the abundance of gold made it a fairly common ornamental metal. Nero, emperor of Rome in the first century AD, burned a years supply of cinnamon on his wife’s funeral pyre — an extravagant gesture meant to signify the depth of his loss.
Cinnamon was known in medieval Europe, where it was a staple ingredient, along with ginger, in many recipes. Since most meals were prepared in a single cauldron, casseroles containing both meat and fruit were common and cinnamon helped bridge the flavours. When crusaders brought home sugar, it too was added to the pot. Mince pie is a typical combination of this period which still survives.
The demand for cinnamon was enough to launch a number of explorers’ enterprises. The Portuguese invaded Sri Lanka immediately after reaching India in 1536. The Sinhalese King paid the Portuguese tributes of 110,000 kilograms of cinnamon annually.
The Dutch captured Sri Lanka in 1636 and established a system of cultivation that exists to this day. In its wild state, trees grow high on stout trunks. Under cultivation, the shoots are continually cropped almost to ground level, resulting in a low bush, dense with thin leafy branches. From these, come the finest quills.

Spice Description
Cinnamon comes in ‘quills’, strips of bark rolled one in another. The pale brown to tan bar strips are generally thin, the spongy outer bark having been scraped off. The best varieties are pale and parchment-like in appearance. Cinnamon is very similar to cassia, and in North America little distinction is given, though cassia tends to dominate the market. Cinnamon is also available ground, and can be distinguished from cassia by its lighter colour and much finer powder.
Bouquet: sweet and fragrant
Flavour: warm and aromatic
Hotness Scale: 3

Preparation and Storage
Whole quills will keep their flavour indefinitely. Unfortunately it is difficult to grind so for many recipes the powdered variety will be preferred. Like other powdered spices cinnamon loses flavour quickly, so should be purchased in small quantities and kept away from light in airtight containers.

Culinary Uses
Cassia and cinnamon have similar uses, but since it is more delicate, cinnamon is used more in dessert dishes. It is commonly used in cakes and other baked goods, milk and rice puddings, chocolate dishes and fruit desserts, particularly apples and pears. It is common in many Middle Eastern and North African dishes, in flavouring lamb tagines or stuffed aubergines. It is used in curries and pilaus and in garam masala. It may be used to spice mulled wines, creams and syrups. The largest importer of Sri Lankan cinnamon is Mexico, where it is drunk with coffee and chocolate and brewed as a tea.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
Recent studies have determined that consuming as little as one-half teaspoon of Cinnamon each day may reduce blood sugar, cholesterol, and triglyceride levels by as much as 20% in Type II diabetes patients who are not taking insulin it is mildly carminative and used to treat nausea and flatulence. It is also used alone or in combination to treat diarrhea. Chinese herbalists tell of older people, in their 70s and 80s, developing a cough accompanied by frequent spitting of whitish phlegm. A helpful remedy, they suggest, is chewing and swallowing a very small pinch of powdered cinnamon. This remedy can also help people with cold feet and hands, especially at night. Germany's Commission E approves Cinnamon for appetite loss and indigestion. The primary chemical constituents of this herb include cinnamaldehyde, gum, tannin, mannitol, coumarins, and essential oils (aldehydes, eugenol, pinene). Cinnamon is predominantly used as a carminative addition to herbal prescriptions. It is used in flatulent dyspepsia, dyspepsia with nausea, intestinal colic and digestive atony associated with cold & debilitated conditions. It relieves nausea and vomiting, and, because of its mild astringency, it is particularly useful in infantile diarrhea. The cinnamaldehyde component is hypotensive and spasmolytic, and increases peripheral blood flow. The essential oil of this herb is a potent antibacterial, anti-fungal, and uterine stimulant. The various terpenoids found in the volatile oil are believed to account for Cinnamon’s medicinal effects. Test tube studies also show that Cinnamon can augment the action of insulin. However, use of Cinnamon to improve the action of insulin in people with diabetes has yet to be proven in clinical trials.

Plant Description and Cultivation
Cinnamon is from a tropical evergreen tree of the laurel family growing up to 7m (56 ft) in its wild state. It has deeply-veined ovate leaves that are dark green on top, lighter green underneath. The bark is smooth and yellowish. Both the bark and leaves are aromatic. It has small yellowish-white flowers with a disagreeable odour that bear dark purple berries. It prefers a hot, wet tropical climate at a low altitude. Cultivated plantations grow trees as small bushes, no taller than 3 m (10 ft), as the stems are continually cut back to produce new stems for bark. The outer bark, cork and the pithy inner lining are scraped off and the remaining bark is left to dry completely, when it curls and rolls into quills. Several are rolled together to produce a compact final product, which is then cut into uniform lengths and graded according to thickness, aroma and appearance.

Other Names
Ceylon Cinnamon, True Cinnamon
French: cannelle
German: Ceylonzimt, Kaneel
Italian: cannella
Spanish: canela
Chinese: yook gway
Indian: dal-chini, darchini, dhall cheene
Sinhalese: kurundu
Tamil: karuvappadai



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
4/3/08 6:03 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Hi, Linda
Thanks for joining and for the info you sent me. I want to get down to at least 135 as that was my best weight level when I was on 'Dr. A' years ago. MUFA is monounsaturated fats. All the MUFA foods contain the good for you stuff. 10 olives 2.2 net carbs, 1/4 avocado .875 net carbs, 1 oz oil roasted macadamia nuts 1.1 net carbs, I haven't checked on the chocolate. But you have to eat them 4 times a day so you have to multiply these by 4.

I didn't do very well on Induction so I have gone to "0" carbs. Today is the third day and I am in ketosis so I am burning fat. Dr A has a ratio he recommended for protein/fats/carbs but I can't remember it right now.

Eating only when hungry is intuitive eating. My body has an internal clock that tells me four times a day that it is time to eat, but I might not be hungry.

Xana



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


LOVINGHIM555
LOVINGHIM555's Photo Posts: 475
4/2/08 2:40 P

LOVINGHIM555's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Xana, not really replying to pepper -- just wanted to direct message to you. I did join, thanks for asking me! I spent time on these boards yesterday and earned a lot. The link you sent me about MUFA foods was interesting. Whatdoes MUFA stand for? Aren't there lots of carbs in walnuts, etc.? Do you still keep your carbs low-low, or can you lose at a higher count? What about fat and protein? Something I read here was someone saying they eat whatever they want but only when hungry That would NOT work for me. Once I get into white carbs, cravings take over.

I have seen Dr. Rosen on 700 Club many times, and I think he is so fascinating. I saw the video when he was on the View -- I think by clicking the big team icon -- wow! The explanation of visceral fat around the liver was certainly unforgettable.I don't walk really, because it bores me, but do the elliptical, and do zumba which is great for the core and the waist. 4 or 5 times a week total.

If there's a better place to post this, you can move it to some other thread.

Happy losing -- although you don't have far to go!

Linda

Linda


 current weight: 179.0 
 
190
177.5
165
152.5
140


LOVINGHIM555
LOVINGHIM555's Photo Posts: 475
4/2/08 2:39 P

LOVINGHIM555's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
oops double posting, sorry

Edited by: LOVINGHIM555 at: 4/3/2008 (20:23)
Linda


 current weight: 179.0 
 
190
177.5
165
152.5
140


LOVINGHIM555
LOVINGHIM555's Photo Posts: 475
4/2/08 2:39 P

LOVINGHIM555's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Xana, not really replying to pepper -- just wanted to direct message to you. I did join, thanks for asking me! I spent time on these boards yesterday and earned a lot. The link you sent me about MUFA foods was interesting. Whatdoes MUFA stand for? Aren't there lots of carbs in walnuts, etc.? Do you still keep your carbs low-low, or can you lose at a higher count? What about fat and protein? Something I read here was someone saying they eat whatever they want but only when hungry That would NOT work for me. Once I get into white carbs, cravings take over.

I have seen Dr. Rosen on 700 Club many times, and I think he is so fascinating. I saw the video when he was on the View -- I think by clicking the big team icon -- wow! The explanation of visceral fat around the liver was certainly unforgettable.I don't walk really, because it bores me, but do the elliptical, and do zumba which is great for the core and the waist. 4 or 5 times a week total.

If there's a better place to post this, you can move it to some other thread.

Happy losing -- although you don't have far to go!

Linda

Linda


 current weight: 179.0 
 
190
177.5
165
152.5
140


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/22/08 6:11 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Pepper
Piper nigrum: Black, White, Green
Fam: Piperaceae
Schinus terebinthifolius: Pink Pepper
Fam: Anacardiaceae

The history of the spice trade is, above all, the history of pepper, the ‘King of Spices’. Pepper has been moving westward from India for 4,000 years. It has been used in trading as an exchange medium like money and, at times, has been valued so highly that a single peppercorn dropped on the floor would be hunted like a lost pearl. In classical times ‘tributes’ were paid in pepper, and both Attila the Hun and Alaric I the Visigoth demanded pepper as a substantial part of Rome’s ransom. Since the Middle Ages, pepper was the core of the European spice trade, with Genoa and Venice dominating the market. The Italian ‘pepperers’ monopoly of overland trade routes was the major determining factor in driving the search for an eastern sea route. For more historical information, read Pepper: King of Spices.

Spice Description
Pepper comes from several species of a vinous plant, the spice being the fruit, called peppercorns. Black pepper is the dried, unripe berry. The corns are wrinkled and spherical, about 5 mm (1/8 in) in diameter. Malabar and Tellicherry pepper are both considered top quality due to size and maturity, with only 10% of the largest corns being graded as Tellicherry. White pepper starts out the same as the black, but are allowed to ripen more fully on the vine. The outer shell is then removed by soaking the berries in water until the shell falls off, or are held under flowing spring water, yielding a whiter, cleaner pepper. Green pepper is from the same fruit but is harvested before they mature. Pink pepper, which is not a vinous pepper, comes from the French island of Reunion. Pink peppercorns have a brittle, papery pink skin enclosing a hard, irregular seed, much smaller than the whole fruit.
Bouquet: aromatic, pungent
Flavour: Black pepper is very pungent and fiery. Hotness Scale: 8
White pepper is less pungent. Hotness Scale: 7
Green pepper is milder with a cleaner, fresher flavour. Hotness Scale: 3

Preparation and Storage
Pepper is best purchased whole, as freshly ground pepper is vastly superior to the ready ground powder. Whole peppercorns keep their flavour indefinitely but quickly loses its aroma and heat after it has been ground. Peppercorns are very hard but easily ground in a peppermill. Cracked pepper is the partially broken corns, crushed using a mortar and pestle or with a rolling pin. Dried green peppercorns can be reconstituted for mashing into a paste by soaking in water. Peppercorns should be stored in airtight containers, away from sunlight.

Culinary Uses
Pepper is best ground directly on to food. With hot food it is best to add pepper well towards the end of the cooking process, to preserve its aroma. White pepper is used in white sauces rather than black pepper, which would give the sauce a speckled appearance. Green peppercorns can be mashed with garlic, cinnamon or to make a spiced butter or with cream to make a fresh and attractive sauce for fish. Pink peppercorns are called for in a variety of dishes, from poultry to vegetables and fish.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
Stomachic; carminative; aromatic stimulant; antibacterial; diaphoretic. Stimulates the taste-buds causing reflex stimulation of gastric secretions, improving digestion and treating gastro-intestinal upsets and flatulence. Pepper calms nausea and raises body temperature, making it valuable for treating fevers and chills.

Plant Description and Cultivation
An herbaceous annual of the buttercup family, about 60 cm (2 ft) high. The gray--green leaves are wispy and threadlike. Flowers are have five petals bout 2.5 cm wide (1 in), white with blue veins and appearing between June and September. They yield a seed capsule with five compartments each topped by a spike. The compartments open when dried to disperse the seeds. Nigella is native to western Asia where it grows both wild and cultivated. India, Egypt and the Middle East also cultivate it.

Other Names
Black
French: poivre
German: Pfeffer
Italian: pepe nero
Spanish: pimienta negra
Arabic: filfil
Indian: gol/kala,i, mir(i)ch(i)
Indonesian: merica hitam, meritja
Lao: phik noi
Malay: lada hitam
Thai: prik ki tai

White
French: poivre blanc
German: Weisser Pfeffer
Italian: pepe bianco
Spanish: pimienta blanca

Green
French: poivre vert
German: Gruner Pfeffer
Italian: pepe verde
Spanish: pimienta verde

Pink
French: poivre rose
German: Blassroter Pfeffer
Italian: pepe rosa
Spanish: pimienta rosa



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


SHAZZORAMA
SHAZZORAMA's Photo Posts: 657
3/12/08 8:23 A

SHAZZORAMA's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
iteresting, I have wondered if there were uses for tarragon other than certain meats.

"I can do anything, the impossible just takes longer."


 Pounds lost: 5.0 
 
0
44
88
132
176


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/11/08 8:19 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Tarragon's name is derived from the French esdragon, meaning "little dragon." The dragonlike roots may strangle the plant if it is not divided often. In medicinal lore and legend, any plant with a serpentine root system is given credit for treating snakebite, and tarragon is no exception. The Roman scholar Pliny said it could prevent fatigue and pilgrims of the Middle Ages put sprigs of it in their shoes before beginning long trips on foot.

Thomas Jefferson was an early distributor of tarragon in the fledgling United States. In a letter to the President, written in 1809, General John Mason reported that the plant Jefferson had given him "has flourished well in the open air-and will in Spring afford plenty of slips."

Description
This aromatic perennial is grown for its distinctively flavoured leaves. Flowers: Yellow or greenish white; small, globe-shaped; in terminal panicles; rarely fully open and usually sterile. Leaves: Linear to lanceolate, undivided; 1-4 in. long; borne singly at top of plant, in groups of three below. Fruit: Achenes. Height: 2 ft. Native to the Caspian Sea area and Siberia; widely cultivated in Europe, Asia, and the United States.

Culinary Uses
Among cooks, this herb is popularly associated with vinegar and fish. Its aniselike character is particularly suited to both, but tarragon deserves a wider role in the kitchen. Tarragon has a somewhat mysterious property as well; chew on a leaf, and you may notice a numb feeling on your tongue. Although it is one of the French fines herbes, tarragon can be dominating and overshadow or fight with other flavours. Use the leaves fresh in salads, as garnishes, or in such classic applications as remoulade sauce, tartar sauce, béarnaise sauce, French dressing, and veal Marengo. In general, don't add this herb with a heavy hand, and avoid bringing out its bitter side by cooking it too long.

French tarragon lends its unique flavour profile to French sauces such as tartare and bernaise and is an essential component along with chives, chervil and parsley in the subtle blend of herbs known as fines herbes. Tarragon has a particular ability to flavour vinegar, achieved by placing a complete, washed stem with leaves in a bottle of good quality, white wine vinegar for a few weeks. Tarragon vinegar then becomes a useful ingredient for salad dressings and when making homemade mustards. Tarragon complements fish and shellfish; I recall my mother garnishing a fish-shaped seafood mold with gills and fins of tarragon leaves. It goes well with chicken, turkey, game and veal and most egg dishes. The chopped leaves (or rehydrated dry ones) are attractive and tasty in mayonnaise, melted butter sauce and French dressing.

Tarragon enhances fish, shellfish, pork, beef, lamb, game, poultry, pâtés, leeks, potatoes, tomatoes, carrots, onions, artichokes, asparagus, mushrooms, cauliflower, broccoli, beets, peas, parsley, chervil, garlic, chives, lemons, oranges, rice, and barley. Use it in flavored vinegars, herbed mayonnaise, herbed butters, cream sauces, and soups, and with cheeses, eggs, sour cream, and yogurt.
For maximum flavor, add tarragon to long-cooking soups and stews during the last 15 minutes only.


Storage
Frozen tarragon and tarragon stored in vinegar are superior in flavour to the dried.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
Although chiefly a culinary herb, tarragon has been used to stimulate the appetite, relieve flatulence and colic, and cure rheumatism. There appears to be no scientific basis for any of these practices, but tarragon can protect foodstuffs as an antioxidant. Tarragon is also used in perfumes, soaps, and cosmetics, and in condiments and liqueurs. It may be useful as an antifungal as well.It was once believed that Tarragon Leaf could cure insect stings and snakebites, as well as the bites of rabid dogs. A tea made with Tarragon and Chamomile has been used to induce sleep. Tarragon is also a mild diuretic. The herb was used in Ancient Greece to relieve toothache as a sort of local anesthetic, which makes sense due to its containing eugenol, a natural anesthetic.

Cultivation and Propogation
Although not a visually stunning plant, tarragon was at one time restricted to the formal gardens of the European nobility. Take note before buying tarragon seeds: They are apt to be of the less-versatile Russian tarragon, a variety that lacks the aromatic oils of the classical French tarragon (Artemisia Dracunculus var. sativa). Most gardeners acquire tarragon as seedlings, divisions, or cuttings. Take divisions in the early spring as the new growth comes up. Take cuttings in autumn or, in the North, preferably in the spring. Set plants 2 feet apart. Tarragon must be mulched in the winter to protect it from frost. You can bring it inside for a potted winter vacation, but it may transplant poorly and does require lots of light.
Even in warm climates, the plants should be divided every two or three years to assure vigor and flavor. Tarragon most often fails from having been planted in a wet or acid soil. It needs well-drained loam. The clump will always be larger in the second year, with shoots appearing in the late spring. All flower stems should be removed to keep the plant productive.
You can have fresh tarragon year-round by placing plants in pots for the sunny windowsill. See that the roots get good drainage. You can even force tarragon in the winter. In the summer, place a mature plant in a good-size pot, cut it down to the base, wrap the pot in plastic, and place it in the refrigerator until fall to bring the tarragon into dormancy. Then unwrap the pot and place it in a south-facing window to break dormancy and cause the plant to sprout. Take a sprig or two as needed throughout the cold months. A popular stand-in as a potted herb is the mint marigold (Tagetes lucida) from Mexico.

Harvesting and storage: Two harvests can generally be made each year, the first six to eight weeks after setting out. When harvesting, handle the leaves gently, as they bruise easily. Tarragon is best frozen or preserved in white vinegar, but it can be dried as well. Hang the plants upside down in bunches in a warm, dry place out of the sun. It will brown some in drying. Store in an airtight container.



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/10/08 7:58 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Chile Pepper Varieties
The most common species of chile peppers are:
Capsicum annuum (common varieties such as bell peppers, paprika, jalapeños, and the chiltepin)
Capsicum frutescens (includes cayenne and tabasco peppers)
Capsicum chinense (includes the hottest peppers such as habaneros and Scotch bonnets)
Capsicum pubescens (includes the South American rocoto peppers)
Capsicum baccatum (includes the South American aji peppers)


Many of the Mexican chiles have different names for the fresh and dried varieties. A 'poblano' is called 'ancho' when dried and the 'jalapeno' becomes 'chipotle' when dried and smoked. While the following list is by no means exhaustive, some of the more common varieties are briefly described and heat levels on a scale of 1 to 10 are provided.

Aji: [Ahee] (Capsicum baccatum) A fiery hot, fruity, yellow orange chile from Peru. It's full bodied flavour enhances potatoes, chicken, stews and is excellent raw in salsas or salads. Sometimes called Aji Amarillo. 30,000-50,000 SHU. Hotness Scale: 7

Aji Cereza: (Capsicum annuum) Cereza is Spanish for "cherry" and this chile is so named because it resembles a cherry. The extremely hot pods are found in all regions of the Peruvian jungle. There are no commercial growers so the chile is rare outside of Peru. Rich flavour and searing heat. Hotness Scale: 8

Aji Limo: (Capsicum chinense) An extremely hot South American chile that is related to the habanero. A beautiful lantern shaped pod with a deep red colour. Hotness Scale: 9

Aji Mirasol: (Capsicum baccatum) A deep yellowish red chile, 3 - 5 inches long with a distinctive berry like flavour. Used to make stews, escabeche, salsas, yellow mole and other sauces. Can be used as a condiment. Hotness Scale: 7

Aji Panca: (Capsicum chinense) Grown on small farms in Peru, this chile is known for it's distinctive berry flavour. In the Andes, this is the most popular choice for making sauces, stews, escabeche and especially fish. Medium fleshed, 3 to 5 inches long. Hotness Scale: 3

Aji Pinguita: (Capsicum annuum) The unique name of the Aji Pinguita de Mono translates loosely to "little monkey dick," so called because of the pod's size, shape, and color, The pods are small, elongated, and pointed and the chile is among the hottest in Peru. Rarely found outside of Peru, used in almost any dish to add heat. Hotness Scale: 9

Anaheim: [AN-uh-hime](Capsicum annuum) Also known as California Chile and Chile Verde. it was developed from Pasillas to be the ideal size for canning (15 cm long by 4 cm wide) by a factory in Anaheim, California around 1900. It may be used green or red; hotter when red. Red chiles are left on the bush until turning leathery, then dried in the sun to later be ground into powder and sold as chile Colorado. Scoville units: 1,000-10,000. Hotness Scale: 3

Ancho: [AHN-choh] (Capsicum annuum) Ancho means 'wide', its flat heart shape creating one of the largest chiles, a dried Poblano. It is sweet, with hints of raisin and plum. The Ancho is one of the most commonly used chiles in Mexico and is a basic ingredient for making many Mexican style sauces. The ancho, along with the mulato and pasilla form the "holy trinity" of chiles used to make traditional Mexican mole sauces. The Mulato (light brown) and Negro (black) chile are varieties of the Ancho. Scoville units: 1,000-1,500. Hotness Scale: 4

Arbols: (Capsicum frutescens) are also known as a type of cayenne and in some places, Thai or Bird chiles. They are hot, slender, tubular peppers, about 2 to 3 inches long, and bright green when immature, turning a bright red at maturity. They are most commonly found dried.(15,000 to 30,000) Hotness Scale: 7-8

Cascabel: [KAS-kuh-behl] (Capsicum annuum) A dried, plum-shaped, dark blood-red colored chile that ranges in size from about 1 to 11/2 inches in diameter. Cascabel means "little round bell" or "rattle" in Spanish, a name alluding to the rattling sound this chile makes when shaken. This chile, with its rich nutty flavor and medium heat, is excellent in sauces, soups and other cooked dishes. The cascabel chile is also known as chile bola. Scoville units: 3,000. Hotness Scale: 4

Cayenne: [KI-yehn] (Capsicum frutescens) Among the hottest chiles, cayenne peppers are long, thin, sharply pointed red pods that are either straight or curled at the tip; they grow to a length of 6" to 10". (The chile de arbol is closely related and similar in shape, but grows only 2" to 3" in length and usually does not have a curled tip; it is also slightly less pungent.) Ground, dried cayenne is a popular spice. The cayenne may go under several other names such as Thai, Arbol, or Bird. Scoville units: 30,000-50,000. Hotness Scale: 8-9

Charleston Hot: (Capsicum annuum) It is straight to slightly curved because it is a Cayenne, (but much hotter) and 4 to 5 inches long and 3/4 inch across. It matures from green to yellow to orange. It is reported to contain 100,000 Scoville heat units, which is more than twice the heat of a typical Cayenne and about 1/3rd of the heat of a Habanero. Hotness Scale: 9.5

Cherry: (Capsicum annuum) So named for their resemblance to the familiar fruit, cherry peppers are round and red. They range in pungency from mild to moderately hot. Cherry peppers are sold fresh, and also are commonly pickled and sold in jars. Scoville units: 0-3,500. Hotness Scale: 1-5

Chiltepin: see Tepin

Chipotle: [chih-POHT-lay] It has a wrinkled, dark brown skin and a smoky, sweet, almost chocolaty flavor. It can also be found packed in canned adobo sauce. Scoville units: 10,000. Hotness Scale: 5-7

de Arbol: (Capsicum annuum) Meaning a 'tree like' plant with thick woody stems. Peppers are a delicate, slender, cayenne dark-red variety growing up to 3 inches long but thin. Bright brick red colour. From the Oaxaca, Jalisco and Nayarit regions of Mexico. Also known as Cola de rata, Rat's Tail or Cow Horn. Known in Mexico as the Birds Beak chile. 15,000-30,000 SHU. Hotness Scale: 5-8

Dundicut (Dandicut): (Capsicum annuum) Developed and grown in the Tharparkar region of Sindh, Pakistan. Pods range from spherical to teardrop shaped and average 1 inch in diameter. Strong fruity aroma, ripening to a deep ruby red colour. This pepper is commercially cultivated in Pakistan and is considered indispensable for many dishes. Hotness Scale: 5-9

Fresno: [FREHS-noh] (Capsicum annuum) Fresnos are tapered like yellow chiles, and usually harvested when they are immature and a pale green color. They are a bright, red color when mature. (heat varies)

Guajillo: [gwah-HEE-yoh] (Capsicum annuum) Meaning 'little gourd'. The Guajillo, Cascabel (Rattle) or Catarina (Ladybug) chiles all belong to the group known as the Mirasol chiles. The Guajillo from Mexico is a beautiful russet red, translucent, thin-walled dried chile, measuring between 10-15 cm in length and between 2.5-3.25 cm in width. Most chiles grow hanging downwards (pendant). Guajillos grow upright, earning themselves an alternative name Mirasol (i.e. looking at the sun). Its delicate flavour makes it a favourite, especially for colouring, in all forms of New World cooking. Scoville units: 3,000. Hotness Scale: 2-4

Habanero: [ah-bah-NEH-roh] (Capsicum chinense) This chile belongs to the Capsicum Chinense family of peppers, of South American origin. In Mexico it is planted exclusively in the Yucatan Peninsula, where it was probably introduced from Cuba, which might explain its popular name "Habanero". The Habanero is one of the world's hottest chiles. For the uninitiated even a tiny piece of Habanero would cause intense and prolonged oral suffering. Underneath the heat is a delicate plum-tomato apple-like flavour. The riper red ones have a sweetness that gives them a mouthwatering appeal. It is available in green, yellow, scarlet and deep red. It has a number of close relatives such as Scotch Bonnet and Rocoto. It is used mainly raw because it loses subtlety, but not heat, when cooked. Habaneros hold the distinction of being the most fiery of all domesticated peppers; however, their heat can sneak up on you, so beware of taking a second bite if you think the first one wasn't hot (which is unlikely). Furthermore, rather than dissipating quickly, the heat of habaneros persists. They are also called Scotch bonnets. Scoville units: 200,000-300,000. Hotness Scale:10.

Hungarian wax: (Capsicum annuum) These are the hot version of sweet banana peppers. They are never green: the peppers start out yellow and ripen to orange or red and are mostly sold when yellow. Hotness Scale: 4

Jalapeño: [hah-lah-PEH-nyoh] (Capsicum annuum) Probably the most widely used hot pepper, jalapeños are tapered, about 2" in length, and have slight cracks at their stem ends. The name Jalapeno comes from its ancient production center, Jalapa in the state of Veracruz even though it is no longer planted there They vary in degree of heat, sometimes tasting much like a green bell pepper and other times being very hot, with a bite that you notice immediately. Most often, these peppers are consumed at the mature green stage, but sometimes you will find fully ripe red jalapenos on the market. In addition, they are sold canned, sliced, and pickled, and are used in a wide array of products including sausage, cheese, and jelly. Canned types may be milder than fresh because they are usually peeled, seeded, and packed in liquid, but they will still pack a punch. Pickled jalapenos are always hot. A dried and smoked jalapeño is called a chipotle. Scoville units: 2,500-7,000. Hotness Scale: 3-6

Korean Hot: (Capsicum annuum) Related to Thai chile. Bright green, slightly curving with a taper to a point. Grows to 4 inches long. From Korea, Japan and California.

Macho: (Capsicum annuum) Related to the Pequin. Light green and growing to less than a 1/4 inch. Fiery hot with sharp intense flavour. Matures to red. From Oaxaca and Yucatan regions of Mexico. Hotness Scale: 9-10

Mirasol: (Capsicum annuum) Mirasole translates to "looking at the sun" This chile plant has 3 inch elongated pointed pods that grow in erect, upright clusters at the tops of 2 foot tall sturdy plants. Mature pods are a lovely bright red. From Mexico. Mirasol has a distinctive flavour, combining a hint of strawberry in its medium hot pungency. Also called chile Trompa (Elephant's trunk). 80 days. Hotness Scale: 7

Mulato: [moo-LAH-toh] (Capsicum annuum) When dry the pepper is very dark brown, almost black, in colour (due to the chlorophyll remaining in the ripe fruit). It is an important chile in Mexican cooking, along with the Ancho and Pasilla chiles. The Mulato is 10-15 cm long and 5-7.5 cm wide. It is the smoky, licorice, aromatic flavour, as well as its chocolate-black colour which gives it its appeal. Hotness Scale: 2-4.

Paprika: [papp-RE-KAR] (Capsicum annuum) Paprika is the Hungarian word for pepper, but today it has come to mean a particular flavourful spice . The actual chile is a fleshy pod, cultivated in Hungary over the centuries to give maximum flavour, a deep red colouring and variable heat levels. Hotness Scale: 0-2

Pasilla: [pah-SEE-yah] (Capsicum annuum) This dried chile is one of Mexico's most highly regarded chiles, along with the Ancho and Mulato chiles. The Pasilla is also called Chile Negro (black chile). In its fresh form it is known as the Chilaca. It turns from dark green to purpled dark brown as it ripens. . They are used in tamales and quesadillas, and can be interchanged with the poblano in many instances.In Spanish, pasilla means little raisin, and this pepper is so named because of its deep black color and raisinlike aroma. It is mild with a smoky flavor. Scoville units: 1,000 -2,000. Hotness Scale: 3 -5

Pequin: [PEE-KIN] (Capsicum annuum) It's name means small, and refers to the tiniest chiles - which are usually among the hottest. There are many varieties, some round and some conical. Others are called Bravo, Mosquito, Pequeno, Turkey Pepper, Grove Pepper, and Pring-kee-new, Birds Eye, Chilpequin and Chiltipiquin. Related to the wild form called Tepin/Chiltepin. 50,000 SHU. Hotness Scale: 8-9

Peter Pepper: (Capsicum annuum) Also called the Penis Pepper, this is an ornamental chile, bred for fun and for its phallic appearance. Red or green with a length between 7.5-10 cm. It ends in a rounded dome, which is inset inside the main sheath of the chile. Extremely rare variety. From Louisiana and Texas. Hotness Scale: 7-8.

Pimento: (Capsicum annuum) panish paprika is different from the Hungarian variety. It is more heart-shaped, smaller (maximum size is 10 cm long by 6.5 cm wide), and has a little less savory flavor than the Hungarian version. When ground it is called 'Pimiento pare pimenton' in Spanish. Heat level: 0

Pepperoncini: [pep-per-awn-CHEE-nee] (Capsicum annuum) Also known as Tuscan Peppers, this pepper is found in Italy and Greece. Dried, it is wrinkly, curved and russet red, 5-10 cm long and 1.25 cm wide. Hotness Scale: 1-3

Poblano: {poh-BLAH-noh ] (Capsicum annuum) These are ancho peppers in the green state; they look like small, dark green (sometimes almost black) bell peppers at the stem end, tapering to a thin point at the blossom end. The darkest poblanos have the richest flavor. Ranging from fairly mild to hot, poblanos are usually roasted and peeled before using in casseroles, soups, and sauces, or stuffed with meat or cheese for chiles rellenos. Probably Mexico's most popular variety of chile. It has a big interior which is perfect for stuffing. Scoville units: 1,000-2,500. Hotness Scale: 2-3

Red Savina Habanero: (Capsicum chinense) A mutated version of the Habanero, it was recently accepted into the Guinness Book of Records as the hottest chile known. The wrinkled, Chinese-lantern shaped fruits are even hotter than orange Habaneros, tipping the Scoville heat scale at 350,000 to 500,000 units! Red Savinas create an excitingly intense burn in the back of the mouth that tingles and tantalises with the essence of heat. Hotness Scale:10

Rocoto: (Capsicum pubescens) A chile much prized in its native Mexico City for use in salsas. Its size and shape are like a hen's egg and it has a marvellous apple-like flavour. Its seeds are black, which makes it most attractive in salsas. The seeds are brown to black and very large, which easily distinguishes it from other varieties. Cherry-like very meaty fruits. Turns to orange-red when ripe. Hotness Scale: 8

Scotch Bonnet (Capsicum chinense) A native to the Caribbean, the scotch bonnet is possibly the cultivar of chile that Columbus sampled. Very closely related to the Habanero chile, the Scotch Bonnet (or Bahamian, Bahama Mama, Jamaican Hot or Martinique Pepper) is just about as hot. It has a similar apple-cherry tomato flavour. Like the Habanero, it is spherical, although rather more squashed in shape and it is smaller, 3.25-4 cm in diameter. Native to the Caribbean, It is great for salsas and sauces.). 300,000 SHU. Heat level is 9-10

Serrano: [seh-RRAH-noh] (Capsicum annuum) The Serrano, meaning 'from the mountains', is native to Mexico and south-west America. These small (1" to 4" long) torpedo-shaped peppers are primarily consumed fresh, usually in salsas but also for flavoring stews, casseroles and egg dishes.. Serranos are very hot and are typically sold in their mature green state, although they are also sometimes available when red. Scoville units: 10,000-23,000. Hotness Scale: 6-7

Tabasco: (Capsicum frutescens) Yes, this is the chile they use to make Tabasco sauce. The Tabasco grows pointing upwards, is bright red when picked, 4 cm long by 1 cm wide. 30,000 to 50,000 Scoville units. Hotness Scale: 9

Tepin: (Capsicum annuum) It is believed the Tepin, also called Chiltepin, is the original wild chile: the plant from which all others have evolved. It is a tiny round berry slightly larger than a peppercorn. It is very decorative and bright scarlet in colour and, despite its high heat level, it is attractive to wild birds, who helped to distribute it across the prehistoric Americas. Other names include Chile Mosquito, Chile de Pajaro, Chile Silvestre or Tecpintle. Hotness Scale: 8.

Thai: (Capsicum frutescens) These chiles are small, seldom growing larger than 1 to 3 inches long. They are usually less than 1/2 inch wide, but provide plenty of heat. These slightly curvy, potent peppers are typically bright red or deep green, and end in a sharp point. Finely sliced Thai peppers can be mixed with the hot oil in a stir-fry or used to heat up coconut soups and noodle dishes. 50,000 - 100,000 SHU. Hotness Scale: 9

Tien Tsin: (Capsicum annuum) Traditional for Asian cooking. Tien Tsin chile peppers are named after the province of China in which they are harvested. Very hot, bright red, 1-2" Chinese pods. It is often added whole or as oil to Asian soups, stews, sauces and stir-fried dishes as a flavouring. These are the peppers found in your Kung Pao chicken. Hotness Scale: 8-9

Tōgarashi: [toh-gah-RAH-shee] (Capsicum annuum) Small, hot, red Japanese chile available fresh and in various dried forms; rounds, flakes and powder. In Japanese, Tōgarashi means "Chinese mustard" Tōgarashi is also called as Ichimi. Hotness Scale: 8-9

Wax: (Capsicum annuum) Very shiny chiles are often grouped together under the name Wax. Some examples include Hungarian Wax, Caloro, Torrido, Santa Fe Grande and Gold Spike. Sizes vary, as do heat levels and colours.



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/9/08 8:39 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Do any of you use this often?

See Recipes at bottom:

The origins of horseradish are obscure. Native to Mediterranean lands, by the sixteenth century it was reported growing wild in Britain where it was referred to a "red cole". Horseradish is one of the bitter herbs, eaten during the Jewish Passover as a reminder of the bitterness of their enslavement by the Egyptians. It has long been valued for its medicinal properties and is still popular with natural therapists to help relieve respiratory congestion.

Spice Description
Horseradish is a long, rough, tapering root, not unlike a parsnip, with rings, and tiny roots sprouting from the main root. Horseradish is sold fresh, but is more often available grated. Dried, flaked and powdered horseradish is also sold and this retains its pungency more fully than the grated form which is stored in vinegar. The best fresh roots are thick and well grown; thin and insubstantial roots, apart from being hard to use, are inferior in pungency. Japanese horseradish, or wasabi, is a pale green powder, similar in flavour to horseradish but made from the tuber of a herb, Wasabia japonica..
Bouquet: When intact, the root has little aroma. Once scraped or broken, it exudes a penetrating smell and is apt to irritate the nostrils, making the eyes stream even more than onions do.
Flavour: The taste is very strong, very hot and sharp.
Heat Scale: 5-7

Preparation and Storage
Fresh horseradish can be grated at home quite easily but the root should first be trimmed and scraped under running water to remove soil. Not much flavour lies in the central core, which is difficult to grate, and should be discarded. The whole root can be kept in the vegetable drawer of a refrigerator for a few weeks. Grated horseradish may be kept in white vinegar or successfully frozen in a sealed container and used as required. Powdered horseradish is reconstituted by mixing with water but, like powdered mustard, remember to allow time for the full flavour to develop

Culinary Uses
There are no half measures associated with horseradish: it is a potent gastric stimulant and is the perfect accompaniment for rich or rather fatty foods. The main use is in horseradish sauce. This is made most simply by mixing the grated root with sugar and vinegar to the desired consistency. However, cream, sour cream or wine is also a common base for this traditional English sauce to accompany roast beef, sometimes spices such as garlic, mustard and pepper are added.
Albert sauce is a classic accompaniment to boiled or braised beef and is served hot. As a sauce, horseradish also complements tongue, sausages, cold egg dishes, cheese, chicken and hot ham. It is good with fish and is often served with smoked trout. Mixed with yogurt it is a piquant topping to baked potatoes. Horseradish butter is excellent with grilled fish and meat. In America, horseradish is a favourite flavouring in party dips. With grated apple it makes a sharp dressing for fish, and in tomato-based sauces, like "seafood sauce" for shrimp cocktails. When served hot, horseradish loses its pungency and is quite mild. Wasabi is used in Japanese cookery in the fillings for sushi and as a dipping sauce to accompany raw fish. It is mixed to a paste in the same way as mustard and used similarly as a condiment.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
Richer in vitamin C than orange or lemon, horseradish is also a stimulant, diuretic, diaphoretic, rubefacient and antiseptic. Being a gastric stimulant, it is good with rich or fatty indigestible foods. In dropsy, it benefits the system by correcting imbalances in the digestive organs. Bruised horseradish was once used to soothe rheumatism, gout, swellings and chilblains. Infused in wine it becomes a general stimulant and causes perspiration. The volatiles in horseradish have been shown to be antimicrobial against some organisms.Horseradish is a good expectorant, soothing for respiratory problems, and may help relieve rheumatism by stimulating blood flow to inflamed joints.
Buy horseradish supplements here,

Plant Description and Cultivation
Horseradish is a perennial, a member of the mustard and, curiously, the wallflower family. The plant has large, long leaves with pronounced pale veins. It grows best in cool to moderate climates, flourishing in Northern and South-eastern Europe and in Scandinavia. Horseradish is an invasive plant and, if you do not take care to limit its growth, it will take over like a weed. Because of its hardy and prolific nature, it thrives beyond cultivation, growing if the minutest root particle is left in the soil, and has become a horticultural pest. Root sections are planted in the spring and harvested in autumn. The tubers can be stored for the winter, in the same way as potatoes, in a covering of sand.

Other Names
Great Raifort, Horse Plant, Mountain Radish, Red cole
French: moutarde des Allemands, raifort
German: Meerrettich
Italian: rafano
Spanish: rábano picante

Horseradish Sauces

Creamy Horseradish Sauce Recipe

Ingredients:
1/4 cup horseradish -- drained and squeezed dry
1/2 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
1 teaspoon white vinegar or lemon juice
1 cup heavy cream -- whipped
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 pinch paprika

Directions:
Mix horseradish with the sugar, mustard, salt, and paprika until smooth. Gently fold whipped cream into mixture and chill 2 hours. Prepare the day you plan to use. Makes: 1.5 cup

Horseradish Dip
good with veggies

Ingredients:
1 1/2 tsp. horseradish
1/2 c. plain yogurt
1/2 c. sour cream
1 green onion, chopped
1/4 c. finely chopped cucumber
1/4 tsp. seasoned salt
1/4 tsp. pepper


Directions:
In a small bowl mix all ingredients. Serve with raw vegetables. Chill dip overnight for better flavour.

Applesauce Horseradish Sauce Recipe
This goes great with salmon.

Ingredients:
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
1/4 cup sour cream or yogurt
3 tablespoons fresh grated horseradish or prepared horseradish
1 tablespoon white wine vinegar or white vinegar
1/4 teaspoon pepper

Directions:
In a glass bowl combine all the ingredients. Refrigerate at least 1 hour or until chilled.
This recipe for Applesauce Horseradish Sauce makes 1 cup.



 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


CRITTLEBLUE
CRITTLEBLUE's Photo SparkPoints: (0)
Fitness Minutes: (1,350)
Posts: 774
3/8/08 10:40 A

Send Private Message
Reply
We use a lot of lemon pepper and garlic.

"The body never lies"
-Martha Graham,dancer-

"Too many people think life is a spectator sport"
-Katherine Hepburn,actress-

"The triumph can't be had without the struggle"
-Wilma Rudolph,gold medal-winning runner, 1960 Olympics.

"It's never too late-in fiction or in life- to revise"
-Nancy Thayer,writer-


 Pounds lost: 15.0 
 
0
21.25
42.5
63.75
85


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/8/08 6:52 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
My Cauliflower Pizza Crust recipe called for this spice but I din't have any so I left it out. I will buy some to try:

Fennel yields both a herb and a spice. All plant parts are edible: roots, stalks and leaves, with the spice coming from the dried seeds. A native to the Mediterranean, Fennel is an ancient and common plant known to the ancient Greeks and spread throughout Europe by Imperial Rome. It is also grown in India, the Orient, Australia, South America and has become naturalized in the US. It has been called the “meeting’ seed” by the Puritans who would chew it during their long church services. The name derives from the Latin foeniculum, meaning “little hay”.

Spice Description
Fennel seeds split into two, one sometimes remaining on the stalk. They are 4 -8 mm (1/8 - 5/16 in) long, thin and curved, with colour varying from brown to light green (the green being superior).
Bouquet: warm, sweet and aromatic
Flavour: similar to a mild anise
Hotness Scale: 1

Preparation and Storage
Seeds can be used whole or ground in a spice mill or mortar and pestle. Store away from light in airtight containers.

Culinary Uses
As a herb, fennel leaves are used in French and Italian cuisine’s in sauces for fish and in mayonnaise. In Italy fennel is also used to season pork roasts and spicy sausages, especially the Florentine salami finocchiona. It is traditionally considered one of the best herbs for fish dishes. The English use fennel seeds in almost all fish dishes, especially as a court bouillon for poaching fish and seafood. It is used to flavour breads, cakes and confectionery. It is an ingredient of Chinese Five Spices and of some curry powders. Several liquors are flavoured with fennel, including fennouillette, akvavit, gin and was used in distilling absinthe.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
In the first century, Pliny noted that after snakes had shed their skins, they ate fennel to restore their sight. It has since been used as a wash for eyestrain and irritations. Chinese and Hindus used it as a snake bite remedy. It is carminative, a weak diuretic and mild stimulant. The oil is added to purgative medication to prevent intestinal colic. Fennel was once used to stimulate lactation. It allays hunger and was thought to be a cure for obesity in Renaissance Europe. It should not be used in high dosages as it causes muscular spasms and hallucinations.

The major constituents of Fennel, which include the terpenoid anethole, are found in the volatile oil. Anethole and other terpenoids inhibit spasms in smooth muscles, such as those in the intestinal tract, and this is thought to contribute to fennel’s use as a carminative (gas-relieving and gastrointestinal tract cramp-relieving agent). Related compounds to anethole may have mild estrogenic actions, although this has not been proven in humans. Fennel is also thought to possess diuretic (increase in urine production), choleretic (increase in production of bile), pain-reducing, fever-reducing, and anti-microbial actions. The seeds are used as a flavoring agent in many herbal medicines, and to help disperse flatulence. The seeds, and roots, also help to open obstructions of the liver, spleen & gall bladder, and to ease painful swellings, in addition to helping with yellow jaundice, the gout and occasional cramps.




 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/7/08 11:25 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I am making a sparkrecipe today called "Sticky Chicken" It uses lots of spices like garlic, thyme, paprika, cayenne, etc. I added ginger to it.

Fresh ginger is essential to Asian and oriental cookery. It is used in pickles, chutneys and curry pastes and the ground dried root is a constituent of many curry powders. Tender young ginger can be sliced and eaten as a salad. Sometimes the roots will produce green sprouts which can be finely chopped and added to a green salad. In the West, dried ginger is mainly used in cakes and biscuits, especially ginger snaps and gingerbread. Ginger is also used in puddings, jams, preserves and in some drinks like ginger beer, ginger wine and tea. Pickled ginger is a delicious accompaniment to satays and a colourful garnish to many Chinese dishes. Preserved ginger is eaten as a confection, chopped up for cakes and puddings, and is sometimes used as an ice cream ingredient. For more on cooking with ginger see Ginger - Fresh Flavour that's Packing Heat.

Attributed Medicinal Properties
Ginger has long been ascribed aphrodisiac powers, taken either internally or externally. It is mentioned in the Karma Sutra, and in the Melanesian Islands of the South Pacific it is employed ‘to gain the affection of a woman’. Conversely, in the Philippines it is chewed to expel evil spirits. Ginger is a known diaphoretic, meaning it causes one to sweat. It was recorded that Henry VIII instructed the mayor of London to use ginger’s diaphoretic qualities as a plague medicine.

Ginger is most commonly known for its effectiveness as a digestive aid. By increasing the production of digestive fluids and saliva, Ginger helps relieve indigestion, gas pains, diarrhea and stomach cramping. The primary known constituents of Ginger Root include gingerols, zingibain, bisabolenel, oleoresins, starch, essential oil (zingiberene, zingiberole, camphene, cineol, borneol), mucilage, and protein. Ginger root is also used to treat nausea related to both motion sickness and morning sickness. Ginger has been found to be even more effective than Dramamine® in curbing motion sickness, without causing drowsiness. Ginger's anti-inflammatory properties help relieve pain and reduce inflammation associated with arthritis, rheumatism and muscle spasms. Ginger's therapeutic properties effectively stimulate circulation of the blood, removing toxins from the body, cleansing the bowels and kidneys, and nourishing the skin. Other uses for Ginger Root include the treatment of asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory problems by loosening and expelling phlegm from the lungs. Ginger Root may also be used to help break fevers by warming the body and increasing perspiration.





 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


GABRIELLE42
GABRIELLE42's Photo Posts: 7,642
3/6/08 10:56 P

GABRIELLE42's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I use a lot of basil and oregano and also chili powder.


Jane

The road to success always has detours.

I know every single excuse not to eat right or exercise regularly - except for a good one.
Bob Greene


 current weight: 163.6 
 
180
168.25
156.5
144.75
133


TERRMOR
TERRMOR's Photo Posts: 5,074
3/6/08 7:56 A

TERRMOR's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I love basil. Garlic is used a lot here too. I heard garlic was good to lower blood pressure too.
ThNKA FOR THE INFO.
Terri

Bamamom of 3

I lost 27 so far on WW



 Pounds lost: 26.2 
 
0
17.5
35
52.5
70


XANADUREALM
XANADUREALM's Photo Posts: 7,235
3/6/08 6:56 A

XANADUREALM's SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Post your favorite spice, the ones you used today, or which ones are your favorite. Here's mine for today:

Garlic
Garlic belongs to the family of vegetables called Allium, which also includes onions, scallions, leeks and chives. According to AICR's second expert report, Food, Nutrition, Physical Activity, and the Prevention of Cancer: A Global Perspective, foods belonging to the allium family of vegetables probably protect against stomach cancer. Moreover, the evidence in the report shows that garlic, in particular, probably decreases one’s chances of developing colorectal cancer.

The protective effect of garlic was shown to have a dose response relationship. In other words, highest exposure to the food showed the greatest decrease in risk. For cancer protection, AICR experts suggest including garlic as part of a well-balanced predominantly plant-based diet.

These allium vegetables contain many substances now being studied for their anti-cancer effects, including: allicin, allixin, allyl sulfides, quercetin and a large group of organosulfur compounds. In laboratory studies, components of garlic have shown the ability to slow or stop the growth of tumors in prostate, bladder, colon and stomach tissue.

Laboratory research has also shown that one garlic component, called diallyl disulfide, exerts potent preventive effects against cancers of the skin, colon and lung. Recently, this compound proved able to kill leukemia cells in the laboratory. A compound derived from garlic called ajoene has displayed similar activity.

In animal studies, components in Allium vegetables have slowed the development of cancer in several stages and at various body sites: stomach, breast, esophagus, colon and lung.




 current weight: 148.0 
 
176
165.25
154.5
143.75
133


 
Page: 1 of (1)  
   
Report Innappropriate Post

Other Waist Management Team Spark Tips, Tricks and Challenges Posts


Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=3191x5214x12878870

Review our Community Guidelines