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MBSHAZZER's Photo MBSHAZZER Posts: 18,461
1/28/11 10:18 A

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More on the tomato paste... measure the leftover into tablespoon size portions. Place on a sheet of wax paper or tin foil and put in freezer. Once frozen, you can take the "blobs" and put them into a container.

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60SIXTY's Photo 60SIXTY Posts: 24,911
1/28/11 7:44 A

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This is good to know.
My daughter and I are going to share a "half share" at a CSA this year. They have kale available now. They must have a green house. We are going to stop by Saturday to check it out.

About tomato paste: I have divided a can into an ice cube tray. But - I think I gave all my ice cube trays away. I keep extra plastic items in our cooler. I will have to check and see.

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MARTHAWILL's Photo MARTHAWILL Posts: 3,848
1/27/11 8:05 P

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Spinach or kale - if you bought too much, just freeze it raw. It will break apart and crumble which makes it easy to top off some main course dishes, add to slow cooker or add to smoothies. I make veggie omelettes with a multitude of veggies and egg white in the morning and often top it off with spinach or kale.

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KISSFAN1's Photo KISSFAN1 Posts: 6,256
1/27/11 7:13 P

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That's a very good one. I've never bought those tubes of tomato paste because they are too expensive and never know what to do with the rest of the can when a recipe just calls for 1 tbsp. or something like that.

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MBSHAZZER's Photo MBSHAZZER Posts: 18,461
1/26/11 9:17 A

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Tomato paste! You never need more than a tablespoon or two and the rest of the can goes bad. But you can freeze it and just pop it into recipes as needed!

"Success is not final, failure is not fatal; it is the courage to continue that counts" - Winston Churchill

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KISSFAN1's Photo KISSFAN1 Posts: 6,256
1/26/11 8:04 A

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Great information everyone! I have frozen mac and cheese that I've made in the crock pot and it didn't get eaten entirely by my family since it makes a lot.

They ate it fine after it was reheated in the microwave. When you think about it, they have a lot of these foods in the frozen dinner/entree section at your grocery store.

My son freezes his yogurt and prefers it that way, particularly the kind you get in the tube.

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VALI_T's Photo VALI_T SparkPoints: (99,158)
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1/25/11 9:04 P

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My husband likes the absolute most expensive brand of fiber bread I can buy at my local grocery. So when it goes on sale for half price I buy 6 or 8 loaves and freeze them. I had never thought of this until my mother mentioned freezing bread a few months ago.

I will say that my hubby accidentally froze half a jug of fat free milk a few months ago. I just said oh, thaw it out and it will be just fine, but after it thawed it kept separating and he wouldn't drink it after mixing it up. We probably just threw it away, though now I wish I'd used it to cook with. Oh well...live and learn...

Edited by: VALI_T at: 1/25/2011 (21:05)
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SRIVERS1's Photo SRIVERS1 Posts: 11,090
1/25/11 7:54 P

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I make pasta sauces and freeze them. Also broth and soup.

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MBSHAZZER's Photo MBSHAZZER Posts: 18,461
1/25/11 11:58 A

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This one is a no-brainer, but I like to freeze leftover coffee in ice cube trays. It can then be added to smoothies, to cool a cup of very hot coffee, or to turn room temperature coffee into iced!

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KARENZIO's Photo KARENZIO Posts: 1,900
1/25/11 11:39 A

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Yoghurt freezes really nicely and makes a nice snack in the summer! My parents buy yoghurt that comes in tubes -- I think the brand is Yoplait? -- which are easy to eat, but expensive. I pour yoghurt into popsicle molds. So yummy!

KISSFAN1's Photo KISSFAN1 Posts: 6,256
1/25/11 7:58 A

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I've never frozen milk so I have no experience with it, but have heard that skim milk does better than full-fat. I doubt my family would care for drinking it after freezing, but I know there are people who do it.

Of course you have to remove some of it from the jug or it will explode if there is no room for the milk to expand.

I remember drinking evaporated milk mixed with water because my mother would run out of regular milk all the time and it was not very tasty in my cereal, so I'm assuming frozen milk would have the same "taste" perhaps?

Here's a site I just found about freezing milk and it suggests that you use the frozen milk for baking and not drinking.

http://www.ochef.com/1030.htm



Edited by: KISSFAN1 at: 1/25/2011 (08:00)
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KURTORTOISE's Photo KURTORTOISE SparkPoints: (9,209)
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1/25/11 7:57 A

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Yes, milk products separate, especially half and half. You can get by with things like yogurt and sour cream if you're going to use them in recipes.
Mayonnaise is another thing that's not freezable. I hadn't noticed that there's a no freeze warning on the cap until after I'd done it once.
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60SIXTY's Photo 60SIXTY Posts: 24,911
1/25/11 7:41 A

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I froze milk once, but it separated and wasn't what any of us considered drinkable. I made pudding out of it.

Linda - North East Indiana, USA `Goal to build myself up to reach 1,000 fitness minutes per month.

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KISSFAN1's Photo KISSFAN1 Posts: 6,256
1/25/11 7:04 A

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You're welcome! I knew that you could freeze milk although I've never done that since my freezer (which is attached to my fridge) is always packed with great food buys.



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LINDATWIN2's Photo LINDATWIN2 SparkPoints: (26,447)
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1/25/11 6:59 A

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Thanks for the info. !



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KISSFAN1's Photo KISSFAN1 Posts: 6,256
1/25/11 6:41 A

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A few weeks back we were expecting a lot of snow and ice for our area, which we got, but I was a little freaked out because I had just stocked up on a lot of great deals from my local grocery stores including a super double coupon event, etc.

Anyway, I was afraid of losing power but did some research the day or so before the "storm" and found out that people have successfully frozen canned bread items (like Pillsbury cresent rolls, etc.) with no problem as well as hummus (of which I have a lot and pay a good bit for it) among other things. I never thought that you could freeze those things but was willing to do it if it meant that they would be okay should we lose power (they would have lasted longer frozen than in the fridge).

What surprising things have you found out that you can freeze that you had no idea about?

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