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LYBBE1631's Photo LYBBE1631 Posts: 5,794
5/25/08 2:13 P

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We have just started using chia. Here in Canada it's sold under the brand name Salba, but I buy mine in bulk at the Bulk Barn. I got it because of its high calcium/low iron ratios.

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DEEANN8's Photo DEEANN8 Posts: 5,122
5/25/08 2:02 P

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What is a chia? Sounds interesting.

Dee

"All things can be done for the one who believes." Mark 9:23

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HENGYMAMA's Photo HENGYMAMA Posts: 8
5/25/08 1:36 P

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Anyone tried chia seeds? They are very high in calcium, protein and omegas. I gel them and put then in everything.

MSLOVECHILD*'s Photo MSLOVECHILD* Posts: 328
12/13/07 12:05 P

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What an amazing thread you all have here!! My main concern was the calcium- I have recently transitioned to vegan, since then I haven't met the "required amount" but CHIPOLTLE your previous post was great and informative...



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EMBBEAR's Photo EMBBEAR Posts: 1,218
12/12/07 6:56 P

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You can easily get your daily protein intake from vegetables, legumes, and nuts. I hardly eat nuts but I usually reach my protein goals with a variety of veggies (1.5 cups of peas have 11 grams of protein, a potato has 8 grams, beans have around 13-14 grams) I have never had an issue getting enough protein without meat and I've found after recently giving up dairy that I have no problem getting dairy without dairy products. It all adds up though out the day.

As for calcium, some NDs are saying that calcium deficiency is non existent, in a world wide study it was discovered there wasn't a single case of disease/illness due to low calcium. Calcium is a mineral that comes from the ground, plants intake the calcium, and animals intake the calcium from plants, finally if you are a meat eater/dairy consumer you get the calcium from the animals/ animal products. It only makes sense to get calcium closer to the source, from the plants themselves. Many vegetables contain calcium. Also, too much calcium has been known to cause a build up in the kidneys which eventually later in life results in calcium kidney stones (not a fun thing to go through)

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PARROTWOMAN's Photo PARROTWOMAN SparkPoints: (0)
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12/12/07 4:58 P

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Yes, it's a meat substitute. In fact, the Vegan Vittles cookbook I mentioned earlier has recipes for seitan pot roast, buffalo wings and meatloaf.

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DEEANN8's Photo DEEANN8 Posts: 5,122
12/12/07 4:05 P

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emoticon

Dee

"All things can be done for the one who believes." Mark 9:23

“Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” --Will Rogers
AZLADY2's Photo AZLADY2 Posts: 1,747
12/12/07 3:59 P

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Seitan is a concentrated protein source made by developing the gluten in whole wheat flour then washing away the endosperm that ordinarily surrounds it.

The resulting blob is then typically simmered in broth to give it flavor. It can be left in one piece, as a roast, or sliced or chopped, either before or after simmering.

I've participated in making it in a class, but I don't seek it out, as it isn't a whole food.

Flo


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DEEANN8's Photo DEEANN8 Posts: 5,122
12/12/07 3:46 P

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So it's like a meat substitute that can be used instead of ground meat?

Dee

"All things can be done for the one who believes." Mark 9:23

“Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” --Will Rogers
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12/12/07 3:41 P

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http://www.vrg.org/recipes/vjseitan.htm

This website has a recipe for seitan and some recipes using it.

Seitan is a meaty sort of vegan protein source. It's made from vital wheat gluten. You can buy it in health food stores, but it's kind of spendy. I make my own, and it freezes very well. I use the seitan recipes in Vegan with a Vengeance and Vegan Vittles, but the one on the above website looks very similar. The Vegan Vittles cookbook (by Jo Stepaniak--I probably have the name spelled wrong) has a great ground seitan recipe where you bake it and then grind it. That works great for vegan "meatloaf" or homemade veggie burgers because it's nice and moist and holds together well. It's also nice in spaghetti sauce.

Debbie
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DEEANN8's Photo DEEANN8 Posts: 5,122
12/12/07 3:18 P

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WILL, Very interesting article. And too much animal protein can also lead to gout, especially in men.

PARROTWOMAN, What is seitan?


Dee

"All things can be done for the one who believes." Mark 9:23

“Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.” --Will Rogers
SKINNYPUP's Photo SKINNYPUP SparkPoints: (6,675)
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12/12/07 2:22 P

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Thanks Lybb. I agree on your sodium point. As soon as I started to take notice of sodium, I saw better results.

Thanks to the tracker, I really learned a lot and got rid of sodium rich foods altoghether, particularly frozen.

The protein powder is fun and random and it's probably the one thing I'd have a hard time getting rid of in my quest for clean!

I still love meat too much to consider leaving it entirely. But I love vegetables even more... so one day in my future I expect the transition.

i know myself all too well....

mmmm PEAS! I love Peas!

I'm only as strong as the coffee I drink and the hair spray I use...

LYBBE1631's Photo LYBBE1631 Posts: 5,794
12/12/07 2:14 P

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Parrotwoman - I would love to have your recipe for seitan. I've never made it but would love to try.

True religion is the life we lead...not the creed we profess.

Have no regrets.

Peace, Balance, Always

Pain is temporary - Quitting is forever.


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LYBBE1631's Photo LYBBE1631 Posts: 5,794
12/12/07 2:13 P

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I realized after I posted that note that it sounded a bit snotty, and I fer shure did not mean it that way. My fave sources of protein are sprouted lentils, beans, peas and soy and almond milk. Almonds in moderation. I also eat lots of green leafy vegetables, fruit and sprouted wheat. There are lots of 'bad' vegetarian products out there - most contain an over-abundance of sodium. In my world simple is best. There's nothing wrong with protein powder - I was just pointing out that it's manufactured.

True religion is the life we lead...not the creed we profess.

Have no regrets.

Peace, Balance, Always

Pain is temporary - Quitting is forever.


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PARROTWOMAN's Photo PARROTWOMAN SparkPoints: (0)
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12/12/07 2:06 P

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I eat tofu, tempeh, seitan (which I make), TVP, beans and nuts. All are good vegetarian sources of protein.

Debbie
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SKINNYPUP's Photo SKINNYPUP SparkPoints: (6,675)
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12/12/07 1:57 P

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Hi Lybbe...

I'm no vegan or vegetarian yet but I eat mostly vegetables. It's really not hard to fill the protein need.

Question: What is your favorite source of protein, then?

I choose chicken and fish and the random, maybe 1 per week protein powder- it's whey. The powder is sweetened by stevia only.. It's helped me to enjoy fruit more ( smoothies ) and have fun with other nutritious whole food drinks...

I'm here to learn, as well. Do share when you can :) emoticon

I'm only as strong as the coffee I drink and the hair spray I use...

SKINNYPUP's Photo SKINNYPUP SparkPoints: (6,675)
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12/12/07 1:50 P

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what about yogurt and calcium...

?



I'm only as strong as the coffee I drink and the hair spray I use...

LYBBE1631's Photo LYBBE1631 Posts: 5,794
12/12/07 1:50 P

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Protein powders can be ok in a pinch - but they are manufactured and you can't ever really be sure of what you're getting. As a vegan, I don't use whey powder, but have on occasion used soy. I prefer to get my protein from whole foods.

True religion is the life we lead...not the creed we profess.

Have no regrets.

Peace, Balance, Always

Pain is temporary - Quitting is forever.


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AZLADY2's Photo AZLADY2 Posts: 1,747
12/12/07 1:48 P

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The rate of broken hips in a country is used as a measure of the rate of osteoporosis. In one of his books Dr. McDougall has a chart of the rate of broken hips versus the dairy intake. The results are striking, and not at all what the Dairy Council wants us to believe.

With very few exceptions, the greater the intake of dairy products in a country, the greater the rate of hip fractures.

Flo


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SKINNYPUP's Photo SKINNYPUP SparkPoints: (6,675)
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12/12/07 1:47 P

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Great thread. Since eating clean, I've incorporated more fruit and vegetables and keep the animal protein down a bit. There are so many healthy resources in protein. One of my favorites is protein powder. Jay Robb puts a good one out that doens't have other ingredients.

Anyway, according to that link it's worth reposting the following: :

"The most significant possible reason for this link between high animal protein and bone loss and hip fractures is because animal products have a high amount of acid, Sellmeyer said. Too much acid may be detrimental to bone health. While vegetables have some acid, they have much higher levels of base. Base is a bicarbonate, a substance that works to neutralize acid. The body works to achieve a balance between base and acid and gets rid of excess acid through urine.

"Our bodies don't like too much acid so our kidneys help us adjust by excreting the acid in urine," Sellmeyer said. "But as we get older, our kidneys are less and less capable of excreting the acid."

This causes bone-which is built of base and other components-- to step in to neutralize the acid. As a byproduct of this action, the bone dissolves over time-causing it to lose mass and calcium.

"We believe this happens very slowly, over decades," Sellmeyer said. Decreased bone mass makes fractures more likely.

While it appears that increasing vegetable protein intake and decreasing animal protein intake can decrease the risk of bone loss and hip fracture in elderly women, Sellmeyer stressed that the point of the study is not to recommend women give up eating meat or cheese.

"Protein is very important in maintaining strong bones and muscles. We don't want people to stop eating animal protein," she said. "But we do want people to work in more fruits and vegetables into their diets--not only because of the impact it could have on bone health, but also the impact it can have on lowering the risk of heart disease, diabetes and other illnesses. This study is yet another reason to eat more fruits and vegetables."

Other study authors are Katie L. Stone, PhD, specialist in the UCSF School of Medicine; Anthony Sebastian, MD, UCSF professor of medicine and co-director of the General Clinical Research Center, and Steven R. Cummings, MD, UCSF professor of medicine.

The National Institutes of Health funded this study.




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WILLBOYWONDER's Photo WILLBOYWONDER SparkPoints: (33,407)
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12/12/07 1:35 P

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High intake of animal protein has been linked also to kidney stones, prostate cancer, lymphoma, bone loss, cardio vascular and cardio pulmonary disease, and you can do searches and find many other things to add to the list. No matter how you slice it, eating animals is dying a slow death.

Here is an interesting article:
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/1
2/
001227082125.htm


Edited by: WILLBOYWONDER at: 12/12/2007 (13:36)
~~ Will ~~

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EMBBEAR's Photo EMBBEAR Posts: 1,218
12/12/07 1:21 P

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I have been reading more and more about how animal protein may cause osteoporosis. The more animal protein we eat the more amino acids are built up in our system if you eat too much protein then it is flushed through your kidney's and liver, if you eat too many amino acids your bones act as a buffer to balance the amount of acid in your body, this degenerates bone density. There have been studies linked to this also, women in Europe and America have a much more likely chance of developing osteoporosis than women in Asia. I plan on researching this subject extensively it would be interesting to find out that all this time we thought calcium helped our bones only to realize our habitual overeating of animal products is the culprit. Any thoughts?

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