Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
MZZCHIEF's Photo MZZCHIEF Posts: 9,058
1/23/13 3:46 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for pointing out the deal with arteries!

HPS, run it by your doctor first, but there's some evidence that vitamin K2(menaquinone)... otherwise known as MK-4 and MK-7(longer half life), is helpful in scavenging calcium from the arterial walls and restoring flexibility. It also helps shepard calcium into the bones.

This is not the same form of vitamin K that is found in green vegetables.
The stuff in Kale and other greens is K1(phylloquinone).

The K2s are a product of fermentation... and the conversion of K1 in the body.
Natural sources are aged cheeses, and natto.

Resident probiotics in our colon make it, but its thought that we can't absorb it from the colon... so its excreted in the feces.

There's some debate as to which form of K2 is best absorbed and utilized in the body, the Mk-4 or the Mk-7. Recently in Japan there was a study that indicated that Mk-4 was found in very low levels in the blood after consumption. So the question is:... Its Mk-4 poorly absorbed, or does it get sucked up into the arterial walls so rapidly, that it doesn't show up in the blood?

Here's a pubmed abstract on K2 referential to arterial calcification:

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18722618

Always good to chat with you...
: )
Mzzchief

Edited by: MZZCHIEF at: 1/23/2013 (15:47)
Never underestimate the value of getting out of your own way.

Team leader of Thyroid Community. www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=732


New Thyroid Community Team Members, please read:
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_mes
sageboard_thread.asp?board=261x732x489
68909&src=email


 current weight: 149.0 
 
156
150.75
145.5
140.25
135
HPSANDDOLLAR Posts: 518
1/23/13 12:23 P

Send Private Message
Reply
Mzz Thanks for the comments!
I think your take aways are right on.

A little more on the arteries related to BP. Hypothyroid arterial stiffness compounds the problem, because pressure builds up in the arteries when they can't pulse and relax efficiently. Unlike true atherosclerosis, the stiffness is reversible with the right thyroid treatment.

Your suggestions are perfect. I record my food in Sparkpeople and did an analysis of my selenium intake. I will add a Brazil nut, ASAP.







 Pounds lost: 29.6 
 
0
10.75
21.5
32.25
43
HPSANDDOLLAR Posts: 518
1/23/13 12:01 P

Send Private Message
Reply
DIANE7786. Thank you for commenting. Hopefully gradually you can bring your doctor around to what your body needs. Despite losing weight, exercising, lowering cholesterol, I had mild hypertension which did not respond to a couple of RX's. He wanted to try something else.

I had this article with me and he was reluctantly willing to try T3 as an experiment. He hit a home run with the first dose. The Cytomel/Synthroid combo has worked for me for about a year now.

It pays to keep researching and tring to understand what is going on.

Edited by: HPSANDDOLLAR at: 1/23/2013 (12:01)
 Pounds lost: 29.6 
 
0
10.75
21.5
32.25
43
ANOTHERMOMOF2's Photo ANOTHERMOMOF2 Posts: 4,404
1/22/13 12:53 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks for the link. It was an interesting read.

Karen

http://www.fitbit.com/user/23NSBD


 July Minutes: 3,277
 
0
31.25
62.5
93.75
125
MZZCHIEF's Photo MZZCHIEF Posts: 9,058
1/21/13 5:28 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thank for the article HPS!

I have the opposite problem... my blood pressure is usually low... always has been.
For example, took it today and its was 90/63... about 10 minutes after aerobix.
I also don't have edema anymore, which is something of a miracle, considering that I have venous insufficiency.

My take away from the article is :
1.Lack of thyroid hormone impacts the kidneys, resulting in edema which in turn can raise blood pressure.
2. Proper amounts of thyroid medication MAY ameliorate hypertension in the Hypothyroid, so correcting the hypothyroid state should be attempted first..
3. Deiodinase, the enzyme that converts T4 to T3, has to be available in sufficient quantities to convert T4 to to T3.

Based on these three, I would think that a Hypothyroid with elevated BP, that is already on thyroid medication may want to consider:

1. Getting their Free T3 levels checked before supplementing with anti-hypertensive drugs. If their levels of T3 are low :

2. Provide the body with a source of selenium... the essential mineral needed to make deiodinase, the enzyme that unlocks T4.

3. Back off the dose of T4 (levothyroxine) and add some T3 to maintain a TSH in the optimal range (1-2 TSH), circumventing the need for deiodinase.

What do you think, HPS?

: )
Mzzchief






Edited by: MZZCHIEF at: 1/21/2013 (17:30)
Never underestimate the value of getting out of your own way.

Team leader of Thyroid Community. www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=732


New Thyroid Community Team Members, please read:
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_mes
sageboard_thread.asp?board=261x732x489
68909&src=email


 current weight: 149.0 
 
156
150.75
145.5
140.25
135
DIANE7786's Photo DIANE7786 SparkPoints: (76,795)
Fitness Minutes: (2,836)
Posts: 3,140
1/21/13 1:17 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I read the article. It's deeper than most I've read about hypo. I wish there were a doctor in my area who was interested in hypo patients. Most of us have to do our best to stay healthy by learning everything we can about other serious health issues hypo can cause.

HPSANDDOLLAR Posts: 518
1/21/13 12:30 P

Send Private Message
Reply
www.medscape.com/viewarticle/733788_
1


I thought I would mention a well footnoted article from Medscape about Hypothyroidism and Hypertension. The article goes beyond blood pressure into some other symptoms I know I have or had.

If I understand this correctly, Mzz has mentioned the enzyme and that it can naturally decrease with aging. One of the studies mentioned in the article uses over 50.

An enzyme (iodothyronine deiodinase ) converts T4 to T3. There are two types of this enzyme mentioned by Staboule et al. D1 has been “found in the thyroid gland, liver, kidneys and other tissues”. D2 has been found in the “CNS, anterior pituitary, human skeletal muscle and brown fat in the rat.”

The authors explain their ideas about how hypothyroidism affects hypertension and arterial stiffness, kidney clearance of electrolytes and protein , water retention (swelling) , hormonal changes, and why we hypothyroids might swell with salt intake. Brown fat is related to temperature sensitivity in infants.




Edited by: HPSANDDOLLAR at: 1/21/2013 (13:56)
 Pounds lost: 29.6 
 
0
10.75
21.5
32.25
43
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Thyroid Community Health Articles up for Discussion Posts

Topics: Last Post:
How much rice do you eat? 9/9/2013 9:48:03 AM
New study about T3//T4 11/21/2013 3:47:00 AM
About eating 6/16/2014 11:41:38 PM
Latest in Fish Oil News 5/25/2013 1:26:23 PM
How to read and understand Scientific Research 7/7/2013 2:23:30 PM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=21504x732x51753116

Review our Community Guidelines