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SEACRONE's Photo SEACRONE Posts: 413
6/27/12 2:10 P

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On the topic of fat-phobia Jaminet writes:


"Stumbling blocks
For most people the diet poses two stumbling blocks: giving up cereal grains and eating more fat.

Getting up cereals like wheat, bread and pasta is the hardest part. Grains are convenient and easy (cereal for breakfast, sandwich at lunch; beer and pasta for dinner) . Worse, they are addictive. Grains like wheat contain natural opiodes which stimulate the same pleasure receptors as morphine and heroin.
But as we’ll see, giving up grains can deliver huge health benefits.

The other difficulty, eating more fat shouldn’t be hard: fat tastes great! But decades of anti-fat propaganda have made us fat-phobic: scared that eating fat will raise serum cholesterol and cause heart attacks or strokes

Fat-phobia is a great mistake. Above about 600 calories per day, dietary carbs increase fat in the body but only after poisoning that tissue they touch, and feeding any bacteria that intercept them. Excess carbs generate a bad lipid profile and contribute to heart disease, cancer, obesity diabetes and dementia. Switching to a fat-rich diet is a key step toward good health.

Fat-phobia does have some basis in fact. Omega 6 fats are toxic in excess. High omega 6 diets, especially if also carb-rich and toxin-rich, quickly poison lab animals. (Resorting to omega-6-plus grain or sugar diets is a favorite trick of diet researchers; it can wreck the health of mice in a few months – very convenient if you need to get a paper out quickly ,) so it is important if you don’t want to go away if those lab mice, to avoid omega-6 rich oils like soybean oil and corn oil

We’ll start with a preview that looks at mammals and mother’s milk for a few reasons to abandon fat-phobia and embrace a low (20% calories) carb / high (65% calories) fat diet. This preview is intended to persuade you that the diet makes sense, and is worth a try - and it is worth reading the rest of the book But remember:

The proof of the diet is in the eating.

If you try the diet, you will see your health improve. The trying may be hard… but the rewards will be persuasive. "




Marti
~~~~~~~
If the early bird catches the worm, I'd rather be late & eat cheesecake!



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SEACRONE's Photo SEACRONE Posts: 413
6/27/12 9:30 A

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I've recently purchased this book in ereader format but I haven't read and studied it cover to cover. There is a lot of science in it and it has 59 pages of end notes. Alway I'm not ready to write an exhaustive report on its content, but I can answer some questions that have come up.

The extended title is "Perfect Health Diet, Four Steps to Renewed Health, Youthful Vitality & Long Life." (hereafter I will refer to this as PHD)

The four steps are:
One - Optimize Macro Nutrition
Two - Eat Paleo, Not Toxic
Three - Be Well Nourished
Four - Heal and Prevent Disease

One question that I can recall off the top of my head was "is this a low carb diet?"
Answer: It's considered to be a "low to moderate" carb diet with the macronutrients being as follows:
Carbs = 20%
Fat = 65%
Protein = 15%

For comparison the standard American diet is 52% carbs, 33% fat, and 15% protein.

Jaminet recommends that some people - those with insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, etc. will need to keep their carbs on the lower side.

That's all I'll say on this book for now. I'll add to this thread as time goes on.



Marti
~~~~~~~
If the early bird catches the worm, I'd rather be late & eat cheesecake!



 Pounds lost: 71.0 
 
0
27.5
55
82.5
110
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