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DIANNA772's Photo DIANNA772 SparkPoints: (2,671)
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6/18/12 10:09 P

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Also thank you to all the nurses for being nurses. Especially thanks to all the great mentors out there. I was truly honored to be asked by our school's vice president to do the spiritual prayer for my school. Sorry I do not know who wrote it but it states everything I truly feel:)
A nurse's prayer
Almighty god, divine healer of all,
Grant Me, your handmaiden, strength and courage in my calling
Give to my heart, compassion and understanding
Give to my hands, skill and tenderness
Give to my mind knowledge and wisdom
Especially, dear lord, help me always to remember the true purpose of my vocation,
That of self-less sevice and dedication to the weak and despairing in body and spirit
Amen

Edited by: DIANNA772 at: 6/18/2012 (22:10)
Positive Attitude makes a difference:)


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DIANNA772's Photo DIANNA772 SparkPoints: (2,671)
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6/18/12 9:49 P

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I am a new grad nurse who just took her NCLEX today and God willing will be licensed with a new job at the end of the month. I am extremely mortified of the stresses I know will come with the new grad job but I’m also overly excited with the idea of helping others and starting a new rewarding career. I graduated second to third top of my class and feel I have a great deal of knowledge from reading (no thanks to the school). Even still, book knowledge does not compare to experience. I’m still trying to learn the skill side of nursing. I just wanted to say and remind that everyone was once the grad nurse, so nxt time please think back to then and how you felt when you were bullied (one of the worst feelings ever). There, of course, is a way to teach the inexperienced. Do not let us get away with passing time, being timid, and just sitting at the nurses’ station. Show us the way and correct us in a respectful manner when were wrong. Please always correct because I for one do not want to feel like I did something right because the nurse was too polite to tell me or just too busy. I do understand that it is busy but the better you teach the sooner the inexperienced nurse will step up and help you and our pts. I can not wait to be a great experienced nurse like you but I need to be taught and mentored to hopefully become who we’ve always wanted to be.

Positive Attitude makes a difference:)


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MADAMCHESKI3's Photo MADAMCHESKI3 SparkPoints: (215)
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5/3/12 5:12 A

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I agree it is stress related. As a newer nurse I've received my fair share of "being eaten", and it's usually by someone who is getting the brunt of something else. In a twelve hour shift so much can happen, go wrong or just get busy. We all know we've got a lot to do in a little amount of time and whether it's right or wrong, those who don't deserve it tend to get the worst.

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BABYSTEPS84's Photo BABYSTEPS84 SparkPoints: (16,336)
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1/23/12 1:57 A

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I think it makes a big difference on your general treatment of new people, new employees. Do you actively welcome them and treat them with respect? Do you treat them with the assumption that they are going to quit or going to stay? Are you supportive? Do you check on them and make sure they are okay? Do you respect their experience?
Basically. How professionally does our profession act? Unfortunately, far too often, not. So, it starts with us. Attitude goes a long way!

Someday is TODAY!


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RUBYYR's Photo RUBYYR SparkPoints: (33,750)
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1/17/12 3:56 P

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You make some excellent points Walking Grandma. Nurses are so stressed with so much to do and so little time to do it. The acuity of the patients are is higher than they used to be. Do you think there s there a way that could make this process easier on the new and the older nurses? We don't want to eat our young and they don't want to get eaten but it seems the stress of the experienced nurses and the uncertainty of the less experienced ones clash.

Even though the economy is skewing the job market right now, we are facing a huge nursing shortage in the very near future - we'll all be retiring and it will be up to the younger nurses to take over and care for us.

I'd be very interested in hearing ideas from anyone.

thanks!

“Fall seven times. Stand up eight.” Japanese proverb

don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened. ~ dr. seuss
WALKINGGRANDMA's Photo WALKINGGRANDMA Posts: 18,495
1/16/12 11:14 P

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I just finished a vicious shift. It was very busy, very stressful, many demanding patients and many fresh post-ops. I had an experienced nurse who was orienting a new nurse, a preceptee for the same nurse and an inexperienced CNA. I ended up having to do the work of the CNA, the experienced nurse and his orients as they were sitting around and ignoring call lights, phone calls, and patient needs.

I got a little terse and stressed. Supervision hides when we have shifts like this, so there was no help. My nurse manager hid in her office all day and never once ventured down to see what was happening.

I was unpleasant at times with the nurses, especially the inexperienced ones. I felt badly, but they needed to step up and help a little more. When things got under control, no thanks to any of them, I was able to apologize and discuss with the CNA why I was upset. I tried to make some learning experiences for her in the couple of hours left, but it was probably too little too late.

We eat our young when there is too much to do and no time. We eat our young when the patient needs are not being met. There are days like that. I hope you don't take it personally, but it helps if new nurses could step up a little and help a little more when times are tough.

Call me WG
A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.
Oscar Wilde

You will never "find" time for anything. If you want time, you must make it.
Charles Bruxton


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1/16/12 5:46 P

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As I am in my final semester of nursing school, I have completed most of my science and traditional nursing classes and moved on to a more group-oriented set of classes. In leadership, our first assignment was actually to read a chapter in Theresa Brown's "Critical Care," which coincidentally was about nurse-nurse bullying. When reflecting on the chapter, I realized I have already experienced this bullying on the floor as a student =/ I'm starting to look for jobs after graduation, and hope that I find a welcoming floor to become a part of!



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WALKINGGRANDMA's Photo WALKINGGRANDMA Posts: 18,495
1/2/12 6:29 P

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I think it is not entirely the fault of the "older nurses." Some responsibility rests in the hands of the new nurses who come into the job. They often come in with these preconceived notions and are eager to show off their skills. Sometimes, this brings them to question the other nurses which can be bad and good, but there are often reasons things are done the way they are that have nothing to do with the classroom/clinical rules.

I know that the young nurses who come in with a smug attitude and are not willing to pay their dues and are not willing to listen and learn are more likely to be "eaten." More experiences nurses should be and are willing to learn, but it needs to be the same ways that the newer nurses need to learn.

Both sides need to learn how to make learning experiences and sharing experiences positive. There are often several "right ways" to do something and it is important that both sides keep an open mind and listen and observe. Making these exchanges "learning moments" instead of hostile correction experiences will go a long way toward reducing the problems we all know exist.

Call me WG
A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.
Oscar Wilde

You will never "find" time for anything. If you want time, you must make it.
Charles Bruxton


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BABYSTEPS84's Photo BABYSTEPS84 SparkPoints: (16,336)
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1/2/12 5:49 P

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You will be okay, it's not easy, but give it time

Someday is TODAY!


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THELIBERATION93 SparkPoints: (105)
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1/2/12 11:29 A

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This is the thing that frightens me the most about starting a new job in this field. The insecurities and uncertainties. My mom is also a nurse and she always tells me that I will get my best experience in the ring but all I'm praying for is that I dont get knocked out in the first round. Phew!

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12/5/11 11:49 A

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I have been nursing over 30 years and still believe that we have to take care of our own. We have all been there and we're all human. No one else will do it for us.

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11/6/11 12:18 A

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Good grief.
If only things would change for the better.

Someday is TODAY!


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WALKINGGRANDMA's Photo WALKINGGRANDMA Posts: 18,495
11/5/11 8:01 P

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I think we do what we do in part because of the attitude toward nursing by even our own administrations. There is pressure to perform, blame casting when there is an occurrence, threatened jobs, and more and more load with sicker patients.

I can remember working years (100-150) when we had 4-6 patients and most of them were several days post op. Hysters stayed 5-7 days, gall bladders stayed 5 days, colectomies stayed 3-4 weeks. We would have ambulatory patients without an IV walking the halls and doing most of their own cares for 3-4 days before dischage. With my 5-6 patients, we had a med nurse who would pass all of our pills, a charge nurse who handled doctors and orders, and a few CNAs to help with the tasks. We had ward clerks to answer the phone and handle paperwork.

Now I have 5-6 patients on most days, all much sicker, all needing more care and attention, doctors who have the right to expect good care for their patients and administration who threatens to cut our hours and do more with less.

I don't have time to tend a new nurse and if they have a slow learning curve, it isn't going to work out. That said, I love teaching the new nurses and I think the ones I work with have been great.. They are fast learning, good critical thinking skills, and willing to do a lot.

The economy has made a difference. A few years ago, the young girls wanted the prime hours, no holidays or weekends and my boss gave it to them. "They won't work if I don't." Now they are more willing to earn their stripes. I've done a lot of holidays and weekends and my share of nights (years of them) so I have no sympathy when a young nurse isn't willing to do it.

Call me WG
A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.
Oscar Wilde

You will never "find" time for anything. If you want time, you must make it.
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11/5/11 11:26 A

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wishing you all the best with your new position.............being hopeful is a good thing....
blessings and hugs...........lita

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“There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses; only results.”

When you get to a plateau, think of it as a landing on the stairway to your goal. And maintenance is a lifelong plateau, so a bit of "rehearsal" for maintenance isn't the worst thing in the world

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11/5/11 5:42 A

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It's funny I read this today. I'm at my last shift at a job I'm leaving primarily because of bullying. We are bullied by other nurses, physicians (especially surgeons), and administration. I'm going to my new job feeling like a stray dog that's been beaten. I'm really not sure how I'll handle going somewhere new. It's a little frightening but I am hopeful.

Someday is TODAY!


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5/2/11 6:10 A
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I work w/ a group of nurses who used to be notorious for eating their young. We have a great training program at our facility, but when the nurses undermine it by treating the new nurses like crap, then they choose to leave shortly after their training is complete. When that happens, then those same nurses complain about the fact that no one ever sticks around, and they're always wasting their time training these nurses.

After a couple of years of listening to this, I spoke to my boss about having a meeting regarding this. She agreed and we had an "attitude adjustment" meeting with them. I'm not going to say it was 100% successful, because there will always be those one or two nurses that just won't change no matter what we do... but for the most part, esp. on the night shift, I haven't witnessed any more of this type of treatment. It's been a nice change, and our turnover rate has been improved dramatically over the last year!

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WALKINGGRANDMA's Photo WALKINGGRANDMA Posts: 18,495
5/1/11 1:09 P

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The interesting thing I encounter with younger nurses is age discrimination. I work with nurses younger than my children. I have been practicing longer than they have been alive. I am a good ten years from retirement but about three years ago, a nurse (she is now 24) announced she wanted to be in charge of a department I worked in. She thought she was going to replace me. The interesting thing is that I was not the department head, just an equal coworker. She announced since I would be retiring in a couple of years that she should now be in charge.

I have laughed about it since, but she still treats me as though I am senile and suffer from dementia.

We do eat our young. And our old. I agree that we take our frustrations out on those who cannot defend themselves because we would lose our jobs if we addressed the sources of our frustration.

Call me WG
A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.

Be yourself. Everyone else is already taken.
Oscar Wilde

You will never "find" time for anything. If you want time, you must make it.
Charles Bruxton


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5/1/11 8:19 A

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this so true have encountered this many many times............
when one speaks up nothing is done due to union issues and the enabling continues and so the circle goes round and round..............
i have seen this on every level and not only with new nurses...
thanks for sharing........what great food for thought...........

Edited by: L*I*T*A* at: 5/1/2011 (08:20)

“There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses; only results.”

When you get to a plateau, think of it as a landing on the stairway to your goal. And maintenance is a lifelong plateau, so a bit of "rehearsal" for maintenance isn't the worst thing in the world

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SISTHOROUGHBRED's Photo SISTHOROUGHBRED Posts: 727
5/1/11 6:15 A

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When the Nurse Is a Bully
By THERESA BROWN, R.N.

The New York Times

Theresa BrownIt was the end of my shift, and I listened as one of my co-workers was being hassled over the phone for the second time that day. The computer wouldn’t release a patient record, and a nurse in another department was blaming her.

“Why are nurses so mean to each other?” I blurted out.

“Well yeah,” my co-worker said, “It’s that whole ‘Nurses eat their young’ thing.”

Nurses eat their young. The expression is standard lore among nurses, and it means bullying, harassment, whatever you want to call it. It’s that harsh, sometimes abusive treatment of new nurses that is entrenched on some hospital floors and schools of nursing. It’s the dirty little secret of nursing, and it needs to be publicly acknowledged, and just as publicly discussed, because it’s keeping us down.
The phrase was on my mind that shift, because earlier in the day, a nursing student on the floor had told me about the time she had to make an emergency room visit because of kidney stones, which made her late with a class assignment. Despite a doctor’s note, her nursing instructor didn’t accept the excuse, telling her, “You need to make better life choices.”

I’ve heard similar stories coast to coast, and I’ve experienced hostile treatment myself. In my first nursing job, some of the more senior nurses on the floor lied about work I had or hadn’t done, refused to help me at times when I really needed it, and corrected my inevitable mistakes loudly and whenever possible, in public. By the time I left, I felt like I had a huge bull’s-eye on my back, and once I became a target, it was difficult to be an effective nurse.

The Seattle nurse and consultant Kathleen Bartholomew explores the back-stabbing, intimidation and sabotage that are all too common on some nursing floors in her book “Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young’’ (HCPro, 2006). Ms. Bartholomew notes that because nursing “has its fundamental roots in caring,” it’s often hard for nurses to admit that they could be hurting one another. But studies show that 60 percent of new nurses [pdf] leave their first position within six months because of some form of verbal abuse or harsh treatment from a colleague.

The nurses in my present job treat one another with respect and compassion, and I couldn’t get through my shifts without their support. But in my hospital and in others where I’ve worked, I have seen a petty meanness in how some nurses interact with one another, and with other hospital staff members.

The technical term for such behavior is “horizontal violence.” We all know that nurse. It’s the one who picks a fight with an I.C.U. nurse in front of a patient who, frightened and suddenly struggling to breathe, is on his way to intensive care. It’s the nurse who insists on calling repeatedly to ask why you haven’t done something — given a drug, started a transfusion — a task that, for a number of valid reasons, you haven’t been able to complete. It’s the nurse who boasts about giving a hard time to the interns — the doctors in training — and makes clear how enjoyable it was to pick on them.

Are most nurses like this? Of course not. But it’s a common enough problem that a search in Google or the medical journal database PubMed will turn up academic studies on the phrases “nurses eat their young,” “bullying in nursing,” and “nursing and horizontal violence.”

Floor nursing is a hard job, in part because shifts are so unpredictable. Stable patients can become unstable in the blink of an eye. The portable phones we carry ring constantly and insistently. The timing of tests, procedures and scans is rarely coordinated with other aspects of care. And a staff absence requires the nurses on the floor to pick up the slack by taking extra patients.

Doctors, I have to admit, can also be rude. Phrases like, “Why are you calling me?” “We’ll get to it when we get to it,” and “That’s not important” are undermining and disheartening because they shut down doctor-nurse communication. I don’t hear such phrases often at work, but I have heard them, and they make coordinating patient care difficult.

Spending our shifts feeling pulled in an impossible number of directions, day after day after day, can in the end be too much. A lot of nurses find a way to regroup and stay, while some burn out and quit. But a few nurses will, like cornered animals, bare their teeth and fight back.

The problem is that they don’t fight back against the people who put them in the corner. These overwhelmed and angry nurses take their frustration out on the rest of us stuck in the corner with them, or on anyone — like interns — they perceive as being less powerful than they are.

The nurse researchers Cheryl Woelfle and Ruth McCaffrey speculate on why nurses attack their own in their article “Nurse on Nurse.” “Nurses often lack autonomy, accountability and control over their profession,” they write. “This can often result in displaced and self-destructive aggression within the oppressed group.”

A big problem with remedying nurse-on-nurse hostility is that although it happens, nurses don’t like to talk about it openly.

“It is embarrassing and so remotely removed from our idea of the perfect nurse that we shudder to think it may be true,’’ writes Ms. Bartholomew. “There is an unspoken fear, warranted or not, that acknowledging the problem will make it worse.’’

Ms. Bartholomew argues that the best antidote is open discussion, and I agree. A majority of nurses do not bully on the job, and that majority needs to set a new tone. We have to come out of the corner, stop allowing our co-workers to tear at one another’s flesh and instead speak up. We obviously have a lot on our minds.

. well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/02/11/wh
en
-the-nurse-is-a-bully/


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