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MARGIE100%PURE's Photo MARGIE100%PURE Posts: 1,514
7/8/10 11:58 P

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This is a thread here in this team...I was unable to try them due to certain food intolerances of recipes. I would find myself in a substitution before starting a recipe. These are the words of a fellow g-f member...I thank the generous lady that shared these details with us the first time!

Rice sourdough bread
After mastering and enjoying old fashioned sourdough rye bread I learned I was gluten intolerant and could no longer eat rye. I learned I was also allergic to eggs and dairy products.

Wanting to continue eating bread, I looked at the ingredients in retail gluten free breads and found there was at least one ingredient I needed to avoid in each one. If I was going to be able to eat bread I needed to be able to control the ingredients.
I began experimenting with the sourdough techniques I had mastered for the rye bread.
A word about these recipes...The length and seeming complexity of these recipes may seem like more than any sane baker would want to try but once the theory is understood and the techniques are mastered the recipes come together quickly. I believe you'll find that the delicious end product is well worth the learning curve involved. Please email me if you have questions.

Gluten Free Sourdough Bread

Prep time: 30 minutes
Rise time: 12-24 hours
Baking time: 55-65 minutes
I use a Kitchen Aid Mixer with this recipe

1 cup Boosted Brown rice starter (starter recipe below)
1 ½ cups room temperature filtered water
1 teaspoon salt
½ cup brown rice flour
½ cup sorghum flour
½ cup chick pea flour
½ cup potato flour (not potato starch)
½ cup tapioca flour

Oil loaf pan
Measure flours into a bowl and whisk together
Measure starter into mixer bowl.
Add water and salt, stir a bit to dissolve salt.
Add flour mix to starter mixture and mix on low speed for 15-30 seconds until spongy.
Do not overmix.
With a spatula gently put dough into oiled loaf pan.
Use a hard spatula or potato masher to gently press into pan being careful to preserve sponginess of dough.
Smooth top with hard spatula.
Let rise 12-24 hours in cool oven or other warm place without drafts.
Bake at 325 for 60-75 minutes. At 60 minutes test doneness with a knife or skewer. It should come out mostly clean and not sticky. It will not hurt the bread to bake another 5-10 minutes if you believe it is not quite done. One of the benefits of using a clear pyrex loaf pan is if the bread is not done it will appear white or beige and damp on the bottom. As it moves towards doneness it will appear brown. Cool the bread in the pan on a rack. Remove from pan after at least 30 minutes.

The finished bread is moist. It is best toasted (except right out of the oven. Store it wrapped in wax paper in a hard plastic container. I freeze it stored this way. I usually make 4 loaves at a time and freeze

Bread recipe from The Art of Gluten Free Sourdough Baking recipe package, available at www.food-medicine.com




Boosted Brown Rice Starter
Gluten free, Casein free

Prep time: 5 minutes
Fermentation time: 3-4 days

Start with one cup of brown rice flour and put it in a ceramic or glass bowl
Pour in slightly less than one cup of water and whisk smooth
Add 1-2 tablespoons of water kefir (water kefir recipe below)and whisk again
Cover with a cloth or paper towel and secure with a rubber band
Leave it on the counter away from drafts or extreme temperatures

Feed the starter, with 1/3-1/2 cup of flour and little less water, every 8-12 hours, 2-3 times a day, for a total of four days, whisking smooth and covering
I find with warm summer temperatures feeding 3 times a day is better than twice

After two days put the starter in a clean bowl and continue feeding. (change the bowl so that the dried out starter that clings to the sides of the bowl stays out of the living starter)

After about 48 hours the starter should show signs of viability.
If you don’t see any bubbles or hilling you can add another tablespoon of water kefir

By the third day you should see small bubbles especially during stirring

By the fourth day you may see bubbles of different sizes and there may be a hissing, bubbling sound when they come up from the bottom of the bowl

It should take about 4 days for a brand new starter to be ready for cooking. It may take less time in warm weather and more time in cold weather. With a little practice you will get to know when your starter is ready.

You can store a small amount of starter, ¼ - ½ cup, in the refrigerator for next time. Feed it every 2 weeks by taking it out of the refrigerator, letting it come to room temperature, feed it with a small amount of flour and water, whisk and refrigerate again.

If you plan to make sourdough products a few times a week you may want to use an ongoing starter kept at room temperature on the counter. When you’re ready to cook/bake, remove a small amount ¼ - ½ cup of starter and put it in a clean bowl. Feed 2-3 times a day with roughly equal amounts of flour and water and whisk smooth. Cover and set it aside to continue fermenting. This will be your starter for your next batch. Proceed with your recipe with the remaining starter.

Starter recipe from The Art of Gluten Free Sourdough Baking recipe package, available at www.food-medicine.com




Water Kefir for Boosted Brown Rice Starter
(water kefir is the booster for Brown Rice Starter)

Prep time: 10 minutes
Fermentation time: 2-4 days

Ingredients
2-3 tablespoons Water Kefir grains
2 tablespoons sugar (I find organic dark sugar works best, but any sugar works)
20 raisins (or a comparable amount of figs or prunes)
1 quart of filtered or spring water
1 slice of lemon

Nearly fill a wide mouth quart jar with water.
Add 2 tablespoons sugar, stirring to dissolve, 20 raisins and a slice of lemon or lime.
Add the water kefir grains to the jar or if this is your first batch add the contents of your bottle of water kefir grains into the quart jar.
Cover with a paper towel or cloth and secure with a rubber band.
When raisins float to the top, scoop them and the lemon slice out and discard.
Ferment the water kefir for 6-12 more hours on the counter with the paper towel.
Then store, covered, in fridge and use as needed.
When you have used the liquid down to about an inch in the jar start a new batch in a new jar and pour the water kefir grains plus the liquid their in right into the new jar, cover and ferment.
Lasts about 1 month.

To replenish:
Use the water kefir down to about an inch of water kefir and water kefir grains left in the jar.
When you are ready to make a new batch just a fill a clean jar with 1 quart of water, add sugar and dissolve, add the last inch of water kefir and water kefir grains, trying to get all the grains into the new batch. Add fruit, cover and let ferment.

Other uses for Water Kefir:
tonic, a small amount through the day
supplies lactobacillus and serves as an inoculant for lacto-fermented vegetables, fruits, chutneys 2 Tablespoons per quart -2 cups for 2 gallon crock
soaking grains before cooking (2 Tablespoons) predigests and increases availability of enzymes and B vitamins
soaking beans before cooking (2 Tablespoons) predigests and increases availability of enzymes and B vitamins

Resources: Water Kefir Grains www.Anahatabalance.com
Type in “new_customer_10” for 10% discount on your first order

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www.food-medicine.com www.Anahatabalance.com

Edited by: MARGIE100%PURE at: 7/9/2010 (00:04)
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TELLITFORWARD SparkPoints: (10,826)
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7/5/10 3:34 P

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Yes, I know I'd have to make my own starter from a GF flour, just as I used to make a wheat one. But, I wonder which flour would work the best, and if it would be palatable. I can't find the recipe I once read.
I hadn't thought of using yogurt, but just organic milk. Hmmmm.
Kate

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IVORY1825's Photo IVORY1825 Posts: 7,678
7/5/10 2:52 P

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You would have to start the starter from scratch, as in get the yeast and bacterial cultures separately and add them to a GF bread. I've been considering doing this for a while, possibly starting it with my yogurt whey (homemade yogurt), but I want to read more about sourdough cultures before I do (I'm a microbiologist, so this stuff interests me). Starters with wheat will always gluten-contaminate.

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TEDDYBEARDONNA's Photo TEDDYBEARDONNA Posts: 11,908
7/5/10 1:28 P

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Kathy I know a place that has free shipping for Udi bread and I think it is $5.29. Do you want the information???? It is pricy and I do buy it but use it only when I am very hungry for a sandwich or French Toast.



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7/5/10 11:11 A

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Is it possible to make a sourdough starter and use it in bread? I've seen some nonGF breads which use both the sourdough and yeast. Would this be a disaster or be a good thing to try?
I love Udi's bread, but a $6.30 per 12 ounce loaf, I can't handle it!
Kate

"It is only with the heart that one sees rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
Antoine de Saint Exupery: The Little Prince


"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world."
Heather Cortez
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