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DOTSLADY
DOTSLADY's Photo Posts: 10,015
9/25/09 2:37 P

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Shelley Case has a few articles re: grains under the subtitle "Magazine Articles"

www.glutenfreediet.ca/about_gf.php

KNOWLEDGE = POWER. BODY = TEMPLE. FOOD = MEDICINE. PREVENTION IS THE CURE. YOU ARE WHAT YOU ABSORB!
One person's food is another person's poison.
__________
Celiac Disease: An autoimmune reaction from eating gluten grains: wheat, rye, barley and contaminated oats=nutrient deficiency=cancer. Have 1 of 300 symptoms? bit.ly/cdsymptoms
CD stories: bit.ly/cdstories
Nutrition/Cancer: bit.ly/Quillinnutrition


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LORITOT
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9/14/09 8:55 P

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thank you so much for the post. I actually was just in the store looking at Teff. Could not remember for sure if I could eat it and wondered what it was like since the grains are soooo small. I may have to try it.


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USE2BAGODDESS
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9/14/09 5:53 P

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Thanks for the info DotsLady!


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DOTSLADY
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9/14/09 2:40 P

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Basic Amaranth:

Amaranth is an ancient Aztec grain that is rich in protein and calcium. Amaranth releases a lot of starch while it is cooking; creating a soupier cooked grain, rather than a fluffy one. It is best not add salt to amaranth while it is cooking or it will not absorb enough water to become tender.

Makes 2 cups.

1 c amaranth
2-1/2c water

1. Place amaranth and water in 2-qt pot with a tight fitting lid.
2. Bring to a boil then reduce heat to low and simmer for 20-25 ins. Or til most of the liquid has been absorbed.

******
Basic Brown Rice

Rice with just the hull removed is brown rice. Rice with the hull, bran, and germ removed is white rice. There is a wide variety of brown rice to choose from: short grain, long grain, sweet, jasmine, and basmati are a few.

Makes about 3 cups.

1c brown rice
1-3/4-2c water
Pinch sea salt

1. Place rice, water, and sea salt into a medium pot w/tight fitting lid.
2. Bring to a boil, then turn heat to a low simmer and cook for about 45 mins or until all the water has been absorbed. Remember to never stir the rice while it is cooking.
3. Remove rice from heat source and let stand in the pot for about 10 mins.

******
Basic Sticky Brown Rice:

Serve with a hearty bean soup or use it to make sushi rolls. You may want to make a half batch of this recipe if serving for only a small number of people.

Makes about 8 cups.

2c sweet brown rice
1c short grain brown rice
6c water
Pinch of sea salt

1. Place the rice, water, and sea salt in a med. stainless steel pot.
2. Place pot over med-high heat and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and simmer for about 45 mins.
3. Let stand for a t least 10 mins before serving.

******
Basic Wild Rice

Wild rice is a grass that grows in small lakes and slow-flowing streams and is native to N. America. Native Americans harvested wild rice by canoeing into a stand of plants and bending the ripe grain heads with wooden sticks, called knockers, to get the rice into the canoe. Wild rice is closely related to true rice as both share the same tribe, Oryzeae. Wild rice is higher in protein than regular brown rice and contains a high amount of zinc. Cooked wild rice can be added to soups to made into grain pilafs or stuffed into cooked squash (or peppers-sic).

Makes 3-1/2-4 cups.

1c wild rice
2-1/2-3c water
Pinch of sea salt

1. Rinse the wild rice in a fine strainer and place into a med pot with water and sea salt.
2. Put a lid on the pot and bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for approx 50-55 mins.
3. Remove pot from heat and let stand 10 mins.

******
Basic Buckwheat

Buckwheat can either be found raw or roasted at your local co-op or health food store. The roasted version of buckwheat is called Kasha. Both have a strong and hearty flavor that lends well for cold weather eating.

Makes about 2 cups.

1-1/2c water
1/4 t sea salt
1c buckwheat groats

1. In a med-sized pot, bring water and salt to a boil.
2. Add buckwheat and cover the pan. Reduce heat and simmer for 15-20 mins.

******
Basic Millet:

Millet is small, round, yellow grain with a sweet, earthy taste. It is one of the oldest known foods to humans. Millet is easily digested and is also one of the least allergenic grains. When consumed it helps to destroy harmful yeasts and bacteria in the gut.

Makes about 3-1/2 cups.

1c millet
2-2-1/2c water
Pinch of sea salt

1. Wash millet and drain through a fine strainer. Place millet, water, and sea salt into a medium pot with a tight-fitting lid. Use less water for a fluffy grain, or more water for a creamier grain.
2. Bring to a boil, then turn heat to low and simmer for 30-35mins or until all the water has been absorbed.


Recipe: Millet w/Summer Veggies

Serve this tasty dish with the Fresh Garden Salad with Herbal Vinaigrette*, page 182, for a simple summer meal.

Serves 4.

1-1/2 cups millet
3c water
Pinch sea salt

2-3T extra virgin olive oil
1 med sweet onion, chopped fine
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1 large red bell pepper, diced
2 med. zucchini, diced
2-3 ears fresh corn off the cob
2T fresh thyme leaves
1/4c finely chopped fresh basil
½-1c chopped fresh parsley
Fresh lemon wedges for garnish

1. Rinse the millet in a fine strainer and place into a 3-qt pot with the water and sea salt. Put a lid on the pot and bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for about 30 mins. Remove lid and set aside.
2. In a large skillet or pot, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add onions and sauté until soft, about 3-5 mins. Then add garlic, red bell pepper, zucchini, and corn and sauté until veggies are crisp-tender, about another 5-7 mins, adding water or vegetable broth as necessary to prevent browning.
3. Add cooked millet to vegetable mixture and sauté a minute more. Remove from heat; add fresh herbs and sea salt. Mix well. Taste and adjust salt and seasonings as necessary. Serve w/fresh lemon wedges.

*Herbal Vinaigrette Dressing:
1 sm lemon, juiced
1/3c extra virgin olive oil
2T balsamic vinegar
2t Dijon mustard
1T maple syrup
3T chopped fresh basil
2T chopped fresh chives
1T chopped fresh oregano
1/2t sea salt

1. Whisk together in a bowl, and pour over salad when ready to serve.

******
Basic Quinoa:
Pronounced KEEN-WAH, comes from the Andes Mountains in S. America where it was once a staple food for the Incas. Quinoa contains all eight essential amino acids and has a delicious, light, nutty flavor. Quinoa makes wonderful grain salads or is great served with a vegetable and bean stew.
Directions already given on first post.

Recipe: Coconut Quinoa Pilaf

Delicious served alone or with some sautéed tofu or chicken and steamed broccoli for a balanced meal.

Serves 4.

2c quinoa
1 can coconut milk
2c water
1 bunch green onions, sliced
1 med red bell pepper, diced small
3-4 cloves garlic, crushed
3/4t sea salt
½-1t crushed red chili flakes
1/2c chopped cilantro

1. Rinse the dry quinoa in a fine mesh strainer under warm running water. Quinoa has a natural saponin coating that repels insects and birds and can create a bitter taste. Rinsing the quinoa with warm water removes saponin.
2. Placed rinsed quinoa into a med saucepan with everything but the cilantro. Cover and bring to a boil, then turn heat to a low simmer and cook for about 20 mins.
3. Remove from heat and let pilaf cool in the pot for about 10 mins. Then add chopped cilantro and gently fluff with a fork. Serve hot.


Recipe: Quinoa and Black Bean Salad

This protein packed dish will keep you going during those days when you need a boost without the heaviness of a large meal. Serve this dish alone with or with some steamed winter squash. I learned how to make a version of this recipe in a cooking class while attending Bastyr University.

Serves 4 to 6.

2c quinoa
3-1/2c water
Pinch sea salt

1 c chopped cilantro
5 green onions, sliced
1sm jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely diced
1sm red bell pepper, diced small
2c cooked black beans

Dressing:
1/4c extra virgin olive oil
1/2c fresh squeezed lime juice
1t ground cumin
1-1/2t sea salt or Herbamare bit.ly/Kidah

1. Rinse quinoa in a fine mesh strainer under warm running water. Placed the rinsed quinoa in a med pot with the water and salt. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to low, cover, and let simmer for about 20 mins, or until all the water is absorbed.
2. Remove cooked quinoa from pot, place in a large bowl and let cool
3. Combine dressing ingredients in a small bowl. Whisk together and pour over cooled quinoa, toss well with a fork.
4. Add cilantro, green onions, jalapeno pepper, red bell pepper, and black beans and toss again.


******
Basic Teff

Teff is a very tiny grain that is available in three colors – white, red, or brown – each with its own distinct flavor. Teff originated in Africa where it was once a foraged wild grass before it was cultivated as a staple grain for the Ethiopians. It is now grown in the Snake River Valley of Idaho. Teff is very high in minerals, namely iron. It can be purchased at your local health food store or online at www.teffco.com.

Makes about 3-1/2 cups.

3 cups water
Pinch sea salt
1c teff grain

1. In a med pot, bring water and sea salt to a boil. Add teff and stir a little. Cook for 15-20mins, covered. Towards the end of cooking time, stir occasionally.


******
Basic Oat Groats

Oats, or Avena Sativa, originated in Asia and have been cultivated throughout the world for two thousand years. Oat groats are simply the hulled version of oats. Oats contain a specific fiber known as beta-glucan which can significantly lower cholesterol levels and help to prevent heart disease. Oats contain antioxidant compounds called avenanthramides, which help to prevent free radicals from damaging LDL cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease. If you are gluten-sensitive, be sure to purchase certified gluten-free oats.

1c oat groats
2-1/4c water
Pinch sea salt

1. Place oats, water and sea salt into a med pot with tight-fitting lid.
2. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer for about an hour or until most of the water has been absorbed. Let stand for 10 mins.


**************************************
The recipes I've shared from The Whole Life Nutrition Cookbook on this thread are used with permission from the author.
site: www.wholelifenutrition.net/
recipe blog: www.nourishingmeals.com/
amazon cookbook: bit.ly/37qw8l
*************************************

The suggestions you all have given sound very good!
emoticon

Edited by: DOTSLADY at: 9/14/2009 (16:48)
KNOWLEDGE = POWER. BODY = TEMPLE. FOOD = MEDICINE. PREVENTION IS THE CURE. YOU ARE WHAT YOU ABSORB!
One person's food is another person's poison.
__________
Celiac Disease: An autoimmune reaction from eating gluten grains: wheat, rye, barley and contaminated oats=nutrient deficiency=cancer. Have 1 of 300 symptoms? bit.ly/cdsymptoms
CD stories: bit.ly/cdstories
Nutrition/Cancer: bit.ly/Quillinnutrition


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GFNOMAD
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9/6/09 1:56 P

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I don't like Quinoa flakes by themselves but add some to my rice flakes hot porridge for my winter breakfasts. I've added it to my Spark recipes and since it is my own original creation, I can share it. Check my Spark page and the recipes.
I use Eden Rice Flakes.

Been to Tombouctou and back! Truely! (Timbuktu in English) photos and more Travel Adventures at www.flickr.com/photos/cdnnomad/sets
Recognizing Celiac Disease www.recognizingceliacdisease.
com/21.html

10 Tests that could save your life www.50plus.com/health/10-tests-that-
could-save-your-life/1676/

Dr. Alejandro Junger - 'Healing the gut' (from Dr. Oz) www.doctoroz.com/videos/3-day-jumpst
art-cleanse


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KAZZLE3
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8/27/09 9:16 A

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I like quinoa but never knew about the flakes - thanks!!

Lieutenant Space Monkey
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USE2BAGODDESS
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8/26/09 1:41 P

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Now, I have to take a break and find something to eat for lunch. Unfortunately, I don't have anything as tasty as all of the foods y'all have described.

Tastiest blog yet!!! LOL

I don't make quinoa often but enjoy it when I do. I have made dishes similiar to Ivory's and love it. I used flakes in a recipe as a thickener, but can't remember now what it was I made???


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IVORY1825
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8/26/09 11:15 A

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Here's info on the flakes:

www.recipetips.com/glossary-term/t--38823/
quinoa-flakes.asp


No day but today ...
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"You have to laught at yourself, because you'd cry your eyes out if you didn't"
Emily Saliers - Indigo Girls

~Melissa/Ivory

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ROBIN630
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8/26/09 10:39 A

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I am confused, is there a difference between flakes and regular Quinoa? I have only had the kind that looks sort of like couscous...emoticon


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POEKSTER
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8/26/09 3:41 A

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take some goatscheese or some pesto or olivecream or tomato pesto ... just delicious

I use the flakes as a oatmeal substitute, but I prefer millet ...

Edited by: POEKSTER at: 8/26/2009 (03:42)
Tess

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LORITOT
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8/25/09 9:59 P

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Ivory, that sounds yummy! I too use quinoa as a sub for couscous or rice if I need a change. I have made it in a lot of different ways and love it. (If you can have cheese), quinoa is good, after boiled, mixed with cheese and broccoli and then baked. I have also mixed it with grilled veggies, olive oil, lemon juice and fresh herbs.

I also have eaten it for breakfast with peanut butter, a little soy milk, raisins, cinnamon and walnuts. (Just about anything tastes good with PB!) Dotslady, you should definitely give it another try!


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IVORY1825
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8/25/09 9:48 P

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I use quinoa mostly in recipes where I previously used couscous. My favorite is quinoa with zucchini, yellow squash, cauliflower, grape tomatoes, and chickpeas in a white wine-lemon sauce with sea salt, pepper, parsley and feta cheese.

I've also made a cold quinoa salad with beets, pears, balsamic vinegar, and goat cheese

No day but today ...
-Jonathan Larson - Rent

"You have to laught at yourself, because you'd cry your eyes out if you didn't"
Emily Saliers - Indigo Girls

~Melissa/Ivory

Co-Leader of Project Mayhem
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/g
roups_individual.asp?gid=19990


Co-Leader of Living Healthy with Insulin Resistance/Low GI Diet
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/g
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YVONNE2001
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emoticon Hi everyone. Loved your summary Dotslady. The taste of quinoa is rather bland by itself so when I serve it for a starch with a main meal instead of the water I use either chicken or beef broth and omit the salt. Otherwise, I follow your formula and it turns out great. In fact, even my gluten friends enjoy it.

As for quinoa flakes, I use them instead of oatmeal in recipes. I substitute brown sugar or Blue Agave for the white sugar to give more taste appeal and have used it for 'Matrimonial cake' (an old fashioned date square usually made with oatmeal). Also, I use the flakes for a morning hot cereal and mix in other additions: including choices such as other allowable grains, flax, berries, hemp seed, raisins, cinnamon, ginger, nuts, seeds, fruit, etc. (not everything all at once) and serve with my favorite yogurt or milk (cow, goat, coconut, rice, or soy).

I just want to re-emphasize what Dotslady mentioned: BE SURE TO RINSE QUINOA GRAIN THOROUGHLY. If you forget - you probably will never want to use it again!



Yvonne
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DOTSLADY
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8/25/09 6:05 P

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We've had talk about quinoa on the boards of late, and honestly, I made quinoa flakes once and didn't like it, so I haven't looked back. Let's share what we know here, to make this a positive experience.

My new fave cookbook is Whole Life Nutrition by Alissa Segersten and Tom Malterre, MS, CN. Here's what they share re cooking w/whole gf grains. (synopsized but not much)

1. Sort grains for rocks.
2. Strain through fine strainer the saponin coating (which repels insects/birds and hopefully not you) or it'll cause stomach upset. Rinse til water's clear.
3. To cook: boil water first, then lower heat to simmer. Grains boiled too long=tough, chewy. Grains mushy or clumped=too much water or not initially heated enough. Use stainless steel w/aluminum core pot if you can, for even heat distribution and preventing burned bottoms.
4. Never stir cooking grains as you mess with their natural steam holes which may cause grain to not fully cook.
5. Pinch of sea salt brings out sweetness of grain and helps open it up. W/out salt=flat taste. Amaranth should not be cooked w/salt as it inhibits proper water absorption.

*******
Quinoa

1 c quinoa
1-3/4 c water
pinch sea salt

Rinse in warm water and drain thru fine strainer for reason #2 above.

Place ingredients into med. pot w/tight lid. Bring to boil, reduce heat to low and simmer 15-20mins or til water is all absorbed. Fluff before serving.
About 3 cups.

******
Hmmm, seems the "generic" grain instructions for boiling water first is not applicable to quinoa.
******

...more later.



KNOWLEDGE = POWER. BODY = TEMPLE. FOOD = MEDICINE. PREVENTION IS THE CURE. YOU ARE WHAT YOU ABSORB!
One person's food is another person's poison.
__________
Celiac Disease: An autoimmune reaction from eating gluten grains: wheat, rye, barley and contaminated oats=nutrient deficiency=cancer. Have 1 of 300 symptoms? bit.ly/cdsymptoms
CD stories: bit.ly/cdstories
Nutrition/Cancer: bit.ly/Quillinnutrition


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