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GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
6/5/14 7:55 A

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HOPALONG CASSIDY DAY

Today is the anniversary of the birth of William Boyd, born in Cambridge, Ohio in1895.
Boyd is better known to movie-goers and TV audiences throughout the world as Hopalong Cassidy. He first played the role of the cowboy hero in the 1935 movie, Hop-a-long Cassidy.

What most of us don’t know is that Clarence E. Mulford, the author and creator of the original Hopalong, described him as a rather unsavory character rather than the straight-thinking, straight-shooting cowboy that William Boyd portrayed.

Boyd was Hopalong Cassidy in 66 films through 1948 (he bought the rights to the character in 1945), and then he starred as Hopalong in the successful TV series in the 1950s. For over twenty years, children and adults, alike, thrilled to the adventures of Hopalong Cassidy, his horse Topper, and his sidekick played by George ‘Gabby’ Hayes, and later, by Andy Clyde.

Although William Boyd starred in Cecil B. DeMille’s Volga Boatman; and in many silent movies and a slew of westerns other than the Hopalong Cassidy series; he will always be remembered as ‘Hoppy’.

As a child this was one of my favorite TV programs. I also liked to watch Roy Rogers and The Kate Smith Show.

from: Those Were the Days


Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
4/24/14 8:15 A

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Thursday, April 24, 2014
PIPELESS ORGAN DAY

It was on this date in Chicago, IL that Laurens Hammond announced news that would be favored by many churches across the United States. The news was the development of the pipeless organ -- and a granting of a U.S. patent for same. The year was 1934.
Hammond, a decades-old name in keyboard organs in churches, theaters, auditoriums and homes, is the same Hammond who fostered many of the developments that would make electronic keyboards so popular in modern music. The Hammond B-3 and B-5 organs, for example, became mainstays for many recording artists, while inventions in Hammond organ loud speaker development (the Hammond Leslie Tremelo speaker) produced still other important milestones that allowed small organs to emulate the big concert theater console organs.

Later, solid-state circuitry and computers allowed keyboards the flexibility to sound like other instruments, permitting the organist to play many instruments from the organ’s multiple keyboards.

And you thought there was an entire orchestra hiding in the closet ...

from: ThoseWeretheDays

Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
4/16/14 9:48 A

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It’s physically impossible for a pig to lift its head up and look to the sky.

In 1859, 24 rabbits were released in Australia. In 6 years the population grew to 2 million.

Leg bones of a bat are so thin that it can’t walk because of it.

Deer cannot eat hay.


Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
4/1/14 7:58 A

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Albert Einstein never learned to drive. And he couldn't tie his shoes either. The simple things we take for granted just didn't interest him. He would go days without eating and probably would have starved if it wasn't for his housekeeper.

Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
3/19/14 12:01 P

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Domestic cats can run at 50km/h.

The original title of the musical
“The West Side Story” was
“The East Side Story”.

Sharks are immune to cancer!

Between 1902 and 1907, the same
tiger killed 436 people in India.

Studies show that mosquitoes are attracted
to people who recently ate bananas

Sandie from SC
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3/19/14 8:40 A

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Dear God! Thanks for reminding me not to hold my nose when I sneeze!

emoticon

Edited by: SWEET-SUE at: 3/19/2014 (14:55)
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GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
3/15/14 1:44 A

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Is drinking fruit juice as good for you as eating fruit?

Short answer: No

Calorie for calorie, whole fruit provides more nutritional benefits than drinking the pure juice of that fruit. That's because when you liquefy fruit, stripping away the peel and dumping the pulp, many ingredients like fiber, calcium, vitamin C, and other antioxidants are lost. For comparison, a five-ounce glass of orange juice that contains 69 calories has .3 grams of dietary fiber and 16 milligrams of calcium, whereas an orange with the same number of calories packs 3.1 grams of fiber and 60 milligrams of calcium.


Sandie from SC
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3/13/14 5:07 A

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Thursday, March 13, 2014
UNCLE SAM DAY

Hey! Let’s take the day off! It’s Uncle Sam Day! On this day back in1852, the New York Lantern newspaper published an Uncle Sam cartoon for the first time. The drawing was the work of Frank Henry Bellew. Through the years, the caricature changed with Uncle Sam becoming symbolic of the U.S. being just like a favorite uncle. A prime example of this symbolism were U.S. Army posters that portrayed Uncle Sam pointing and saying, “I want you!” As a result, many of us joined his ranks.

Uncle Sam always wore a nifty suit of red, white and blue, a hat with stars and stripes down the trousers of both of his long legs. The origins of how he became known as Uncle Sam are varied, but include a dock worker wondering what the words “From U.S.” meant on shipping crates. Reportedly, he was told jokingly, “Oh, this is from your Uncle Sam."


from: Those Were the Days



Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
3/6/14 7:46 A

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Mar 6, 1899:
Bayer patents aspirin

On this day in 1899, the Imperial Patent Office in Berlin registers Aspirin, the brand name for acetylsalicylic acid, on behalf of the German pharmaceutical company Friedrich Bayer & Co.

Now the most common drug in household medicine cabinets, acetylsalicylic acid was originally made from a chemical found in the bark of willow trees. In its primitive form, the active ingredient, salicin, was used for centuries in folk medicine, beginning in ancient Greece when Hippocrates used it to relieve pain and fever. Known to doctors since the mid-19thcentury, it was used sparingly due to its unpleasant taste and tendency to damage the stomach.

In 1897, Bayer employee Felix Hoffman found a way to create a stable form of the drug that was easier and more pleasant to take. (Some evidence shows that Hoffman's work was really done by a Jewish chemist, Arthur Eichengrun, whose contributions were covered up during the Nazi era.) After obtaining the patent rights, Bayer began distributing aspirin in powder form to physicians to give to their patients one gram at a time. The brand name came from "a" for acetyl, "spir" from the spirea plant (a source of salicin) and the suffix "in," commonly used for medications. It quickly became the number-one drug worldwide.

Aspirin was made available in tablet form and without a prescription in 1915. Two years later, when Bayer's patent expired during the First World War, the company lost the trademark rights to aspirin in various countries. After the United States entered the war against Germany in April 1917, the Alien Property Custodian, a government agency that administers foreign property, seized Bayer's U.S. assets. Two years later, the Bayer company name and trademarks for the United States and Canada were auctioned off and purchased by Sterling Products Company, later Sterling Winthrop, for $5.3 million.

Bayer became part of IG Farben, the conglomerate of German chemical industries that formed the financial heart of the Nazi regime. After World War II, the Allies split apart IG Farben, and Bayer again emerged as an individual company. Its purchase of Miles Laboratories in 1978 gave it a product line including Alka-Seltzer and Flintstones and One-A-Day Vitamins. In 1994, Bayer bought Sterling Winthrop's over-the-counter business, gaining back rights to the Bayer name and logo and allowing the company once again to profit from American sales of its most famous product.

from: This Day in History

Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
3/4/14 6:01 A

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"In 1939. the New York Times predicted that television would fail because people wouldn't have time to stop and stare at a screen."

Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
3/2/14 7:58 A

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Q: What was the first official White House car?
A: A 1909 White Steamer, ordered by President Taft.

Q: Where was the first drive-in restaurant?
A: Royce Hailey's Pig Stand opened in Dallas in 1921.

Q: Who opened the first drive-in gas station?
A: Gulf opened up the first station in Pittsburgh in 1913.

Q: What city was the first to use parking meters?
A: Oklahoma City, on July 16, 1935

Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
2/26/14 7:54 A

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Multiply

111 111 111 x 111 111 111 =

12 345 678 987 654 321


Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
2/23/14 8:17 A

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STARS, STRIPES & MARINES DAY

It was February 23, 1945 and four days of bitter battle had taken its toll on the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Marine Division of the U.S. Marines. Their task had been to neutralize the defenses and scale the heavily fortified Mount Surabachi. The volcanic peak, at the southern tip of the Japanese island of Iwo Jima, was one of the first objectives of the Marines’ invasion of this small, strategic island, 750 miles south of Tokyo.

Although losses were heavy, the Marine platoon succeeded in its mission and reached the top of Mount Surabachi on this day. Victory was triumphant -- as the famous photograph (by Joe Rosenthal) of these Marines raising the American flag portrayed.

The photograph inspired the Marine Corps Memorial, Iwo Jima Statue which now stands near Arlington National Cemetery, the largest cast bronze statue in the world. This monument is dedicated to all U.S. Marines (since 1775) who have given their lives for their country.

As the flag was being raised, Navy Secretary James Forrestal was standing on the beachhead below. When he saw Old Glory waving in the breeze, he told Lt. General Holland M. Smith, “The raising of that flag on Surabachi means a Marine Corps for the next 500 years.”

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
2/22/14 9:50 A

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"If you sneeze to hard, you can break a rib. If you, however, try to stop a sneeze buy holding your nose with your fingers, you can cause a burst of an artery in your head or your neck and die. If you try to violently keep your eyes open during sneezing, they can pop out of their sockets."


Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
2/21/14 7:18 A

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How much money does an American athlete earn from the U.S. Olympic Committee
for winning a gold medal in the Olympics?

$5,000
$25,000
$50,000
Nothing




Answer:
The U.S. Olympic Committee pays out a $25,000 bonus per gold medal, $15,000 for silver and $10,000 for bronze. The money does not come from the U.S. government. The U.S. Olympic Committee gets its money from the sale of broadcast rights, licensing and trademark income, and corporate sponsorships. Those bonuses pale in comparison to some other nations – Russia pays $114,000 for a gold, and Kazakhstan leads the list with a $250,000 gold medal bonus.

Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
2/18/14 9:49 A

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What is the Olympic motto?

Run, Jump, Win
Faster, Higher, Stronger
Courage, Grace, Strength
Honor, Bravery, Integrity





Answer:
The Olympic motto is made up of three Latin words: Citius, Altius, Fortius, which is Latin for
"Faster, Higher, Stronger."

The motto was proposed by Pierre de Coubertin on the creation of the International Olympic Committee in 1894. Coubertin borrowed it from his friend Henri Didon, a Dominican priest who, amongst other things, was an athletics enthusiast. Coubertin said "These three words represent a programme of moral beauty. The aesthetics of sport are intangible." The motto was introduced in 1924 at the Olympic Games in Paris.



Sandie from SC
GMASANDIE's Photo GMASANDIE Posts: 41,356
2/15/14 9:16 A

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What does the K in KMart stand for?

Answer:

The K stands for Kresge, as in Sebastian S. Kresge, founder of the S.S. Kresge dime store chain. Kresge retired as president of the company in 1929, long before there was any such thing as a K mart. But his name continued to grace the firm's stores.

S.S. Kresge Corp. opened the first Kmart store on March 1, 1962, in Garden City, Michigan, just four months before the first Walmart opened.

A total of eighteen Kmart stores opened that year. Company founder Kresge died on
October 18, 1966. In 1977, S. S. Kresge Corporation changed its name to Kmart Corporation.


I remember as a kid going to the Kresge five and dime store.




Sandie from SC
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2/11/14 7:44 A

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Tuesday, February 11, 2014
INVENTOR’S DAY

Who could have guessed that when little Thomas Alva Edison entered the world on this day in 1847 the world would never be the same.

Little Al (his folks called him Alva or Al) was a curious child, always asking questions. When he didn’t get an answer, he’d try to figure it out for himself by experimenting. His incessant questions exasperated his school teacher so much that Al’s mother had to take him out of school after only three months. A lack of formal education didn’t stop Thomas Edison. He is now considered the greatest inventor in history. In 1928, the U.S. Congress awarded a gold medal to Thomas Edison for “development and application of inventions that have revolutionized civilization in the last century.”

His first invention was an automated telegraph message machine. He attached a gadget to a clock that would send a signal even if he was asleep. From then on, Edison invented more than 2000 gadgets, holding 1,093 patents, some which improved the inventions of others, like the telephone, typewriter, motion pictures, the electric generator and electric-powered trains. He was very close to inventing the radio; he predicted the use of atomic energy, and received $40,000 for his stock-ticker patents. And Al was only going to ask for $5,000, hoping to get $3,000.

One of the world’s most original inventions, the phonograph, was Thomas Edison’s favorite.

He is also credited with inventions such as the storage battery, a cement mixer, the dictaphone, a duplicating machine ... even a way to make synthetic rubber.

Edison received so many awards for his accomplishments that he once joked, “I have to measure them by the quart.”

But, the invention that virtually changed the world forever was his electric incandescent light bulb.

A century later, the genius of Thomas Alva Edison still permeates every part of our lives. He died October 18, 1931, but if he was alive today, we are sure he would still remain humble and insist that his genius was “one percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration.”


from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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2/9/14 8:15 A

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Sunday, February 9, 2014
WEATHER BUREAU DAY

In 1870, the United States Weather Bureau was authorized by Congress. We think people always just sat around and talked about the weather, but it took an act of Congress to do something about it! The weather bureau is officially known as the National Weather Service (NWS) and is a department of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The National Weather Service protects the life and property of U.S. citizensby issuing forecasts and warnings for natural disasters such as hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and severe weather conditions. NWS communicates this information to the populace through an intricate and varied network. The NOAA Weather Wire Service or NWWS is the primary satellite communications system for NWS transmission. Warnings and other services are delivered in this manner to newspapers, radio and TV stations and emergency agencies. More than 6400 individual products are transmitted every day.

NWS also generates data to be delivered to the public over a nationwide network of FM radio transmitter sites. Most of the U.S. including Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam and American Samoa can receive these broadcasts. Cable TV weather channels and AM radio channels also broadcast this information.

No matter how you learn the weather forecast, the age old question still seems to be, “So how’s the weather?”

from: Those Were he Days

Sandie from SC
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1/30/14 8:59 A

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Thursday, January 30, 2014
HI-YO, SILVER DAY

The famous radio western, The Lone Ranger, was heard for the first time on this day in 1933. The program ran for 2,956 episodes and came to an end in late 1954.
George Seaton (Stenius) was the first voice of the Lone Ranger. Jack Deeds and Earle Graser followed in the role. However, it was Brace Beemer who is best remembered as former Texas Ranger, John Reid. He played the part of the black-masked ranger, fighting for frontier justice for thirteen consecutive years.

Riding alongside the Lone Ranger was Tonto, the Indian who had rescued him from death and nursed him back to health after an outlaw ambush had massacred his entire company. The part of Indian scout, Tonto, was played for almost the entire run by a bald-headed Irishman named John Todd. Jim Jewell also fondly referred to the Lone Ranger as ‘kemo sabe’. Jewell produced and directed the series for many years.

Created by Fran Striker (of The Lone Ranger comic-book character fame) and George Trendle, this Western radio adventure series had an interesting twist. The Lone Ranger had a nephew, Dan, who was the father of Britt Reid, another avenger of crime known as The Green Hornet. There was no coincidence that Striker and Trendle also were the creators of The Green Hornet.

But no show began as dramatically as The Lone Ranger with Rossini’sWilliam Tell Overture and the voice of announcers, Fred Foy, Harold Golder, Bob Hite, Brace Beemer, Harold True or Charles Woods proclaiming, “A fiery horse with the speed of light, a cloud of dust and a hearty ‘Hi-yo, Silver!’ The Lone Ranger rides again!”

And, at the end of each show, with a “Hi-yo, Silver, away!” and the sound of hoof beats fading into the distance, you would almost believe that there was a silver bullet lying by your radio.

As a youngster, I loved the Lone Ranger


Sandie from SC
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1/27/14 6:50 A

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National Geographic Society founded

On January 27, 1888, the National Geographic Society is founded in Washington, D.C., for "the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge."

The 33 men who originally met and formed the National Geographic Society were a diverse group of geographers, explorers, teachers, lawyers, cartographers, military officers and financiers. All shared an interest in scientific and geographical knowledge, as well as an opinion that in a time of discovery, invention, change and mass communication, Americans were becoming more curious about the world around them. With this in mind, the men drafted a constitution and elected as the Society's president a lawyer and philanthropist named Gardiner Greene Hubbard. Neither a scientist nor a geographer, Hubbard represented the Society's desire to reach out to the layman.

Nine months after its inception, the Society published its first issue of National Geographic magazine. Readership did not grow, however, until Gilbert H. Grosvenor took over as editor in 1899. In only a few years, Grosvenor boosted circulation from 1,000 to 2 million by discarding the magazine's format of short, overly technical articles for articles of general interest accompanied by photographs. National Geographic quickly became known for its stunning and pioneering photography, being the first to print natural-color photos of sky, sea and the North and South Poles.

The Society used its revenues from the magazine to sponsor expeditions and research projects that furthered humanity's understanding of natural phenomena. In this role, the National Geographic Society has been instrumental in making possible some of the great achievements in exploration and science. To date, it has given out more than 1,400 grants, funding that helped Robert Peary journey to the North Pole, Richard Byrd fly over the South Pole, Jacques Cousteau delve into the sea and Jane Goodall observe wild chimpanzees, among many other projects.

Today, the National Geographic Society is one of the world's largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions. National Geographic continues to sell as a glossy monthly, with a circulation of around 9 million. The Society also sees itself as a guardian of the planet's natural resources, and in this capacity, focuses on ways to broaden its reach and educate its readers about the unique relationship that humans have with the earth.

from: This Day in History

Sandie from SC
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1/17/14 10:33 A

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Friday, January 17, 2014
CABLE CAR DAY

Andrew Smith Hallidie of San Francisco, California received a patent for a cable car system on this day in 1871. The public transportation system was put into operation in the city by the bay in 1873, providing a fast, safe way to travel up and down San Francisco’s steep hills.

Now, Hallidie didn’t just wake up one day and invent his cable car system. This was one situation that proves the truth of the old adage, ‘necessity is the mother of invention.’ Hallidie realized the necessity for the cable car system when he saw a loaded horse-drawn San Francisco streetcar slide backwards on a slippery hill. It was a summer day in 1869, but the cobblestones were wet from the usual San Francisco dampness. The heavily weighted car dragged five of the horses to their deaths. The catastrophe prompted Andrew Hallidie and his partners to do something to prevent this from happening again.

Coincidentally, Hallidie already had the basic product needed to produce his cable car system. His father had filed the first patent in Great Britain for the manufacture of wire rope. Although Andrew was born in England, he had moved to the U.S. in 1852. As a young man, he was able to use his father’s new, tough rope when he designed and built a suspension bridge across Sacramento’s American River. He also had used the wire rope to pull heavy ore cars out of underground gold mines on tracks. The light bulb went on and his wire-rope manufacturing plant (that he had already moved to San Francisco) began the process of making the new cable car system.

A little known fact is that Mr. Hallidie didn’t call them cable cars at first. Originally, one took a trip on ‘the endless wire rope way.’ The cars ran on rails, pulled by an endless steel cable moving on a slot beneath the street surface. In fact, the San Francisco landmark and tourist attraction works the same way today.

Visitors and commuters alike still consider their cable cars a true San Francisco treat.

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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1/3/14 11:02 A

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Friday, January 3, 2014
MARCH OF DIMES DAY

The March of Dimes was established on this day in 1938 --by U.S. President Franklin Delano Roosevelt-- to fight poliomyelitis (Roosevelt himself was afflicted with polio). The organization was originally called the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (as the disease was commonly known).

The March of Dimes accomplished its mission within 20 years. Research led by Dr. Jonas Salk and supported by funds (those marching little dimes) raised annually by thousands of volunteers, resulted in the announcement in April 1955 that the Salk polio vaccine was “safe, potent and effective.” The foundation also supported the research that led to the Sabin oral vaccine, another safe, effective polio preventative discovered by Dr. Albert B. Sabin.

Following the victory over infantile paralysis, the March of Dimes turned its attention to conquering the largest killer and crippler of children: the mental and physical problems that are present at birth.

Today, The March of Dimes raises funds to support research, education and community-based programs to prevent birth defects and help lower the rate of premature births and infant mortality. The March of Dimes is one of the 10 largest voluntary health agencies in the United States, with 101 chapters nationwide


from: ThoseWeretheDays

Sandie from SC
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12/31/13 8:35 A

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Tuesday, December 31, 2013
AULD LANG SYNE DAY

Guy Lombardo and his Royal Canadians played Auld Lang Syne as a New Year’s Eve song for the first time on this night in1929. Auld Lang Syne had been the band’s theme song long before 1929. However, this night was the start of a New Year’s Eve tradition as Lombardo’s famed orchestra played at the Hotel Roosevelt Grill in New York City to usher in the new year.

Where did it Auld begin? Scottish poet Robert Burns said he heard an old man singing the words, and wrote them down; but Burns is considered the original author. The literal translation means “old long since”; less literal: “days gone by”.

The writers and editors of Those Were the Days spend a lot of time with days gone by. So from all of us to all of you the world over: Auld Lang Syne and Happy New Year!

Sandie from SC
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12/27/13 6:09 A

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Dec 27, 1932:
Radio City Music Hall opens

At the height of the Great Depression, thousands turn out for the opening of Radio City Music Hall, a magnificent Art Deco theater in New York City. Radio City Music Hall was designed as a palace for the people, a place of beauty where ordinary people could see high-quality entertainment. Since its 1932 opening, more than 300 million people have gone to Radio City to enjoy movies, stage shows, concerts, and special events.

Radio City Music Hall was the brainchild of the billionaire John D. Rockefeller, Jr., who decided to make the theater the cornerstone of the Rockefeller Complex he was building in a formerly derelict neighborhood in midtown Manhattan.

In its first four decades, Radio City Music Hall alternated as a first-run movie theater and a site for gala stage shows. More than 700 films have premiered at Radio City Music Hall since 1933. In the late 1970's, the theater changed its format and began staging concerts by popular music artists. The Radio City Music Hall Christmas Spectacular, which debuted in 1933, draws more than a million people annually. The show features the high-kicking Rockettes, a precision dance troupe that has been a staple at Radio City since the 1930's.

In 1999, the Hall underwent a seven-month, $70 million restoration. Today, Radio City Music Hall remains the largest indoor theater in the world.

from: This Day in History

Sandie from SC
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11/30/13 7:39 A

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CHURCHILL DAY

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill was born (prematurely) on this day in 1874. He became a British statesman, soldier, and author -- and the first man to be made an honorary citizen of the United States (by an act of Congress on April 9, 1963).

A graduate of Sandhurst Military Academy, Churchill fought in India, the Sudan and South Africa. In 1900 he was elected to the British Parliament. He was the first Lord of the Admiralty (1911-15) in World War I until discredited by the failure of the Dardanelles campaign, which he had championed.

Churchill later served in several cabinet positions in the Liberal government including Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1924 to 1929. Out of office from 1929 to 1939, Churchill issued unheeded warnings of the threat of Nazi Germany.

In 1940, seven months after the outbreak of World War II, Winston Churchill replaced Neville Chamberlain as prime minister. Churchill's stirring oratory, his energy, and his refusal to make peace with Hitler were crucial to maintaining British resistance.

After the fall of France (on June 22, 1940), Germany intended to defeat the British Royal Air Force (RAF). In July, the German Luftwaffe began to bomb British airfields and ports. By September, the Luftwaffe had begun to make nightly raids on London. The RAF fought bravely but were badly outnumbered. However, they still managed to hold off the Luftwaffe. Churchill expressed his nation's gratitude to its airmen: Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.

After the post-war Labour party victory in 1945, Churchill became leader of the opposition. In 1951 he was again elected prime minister. Two years later he was knighted. That same year he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature for ...his mastery of historical and biographical presentation and for his brilliant oratory...

Sir Winston Churchill died in London on January 24, 1965. He is already recorded in our history as one of the greatest statesmen and leaders of the 20th century.

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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11/27/13 6:14 A

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Did you know that there are at least three American towns named after Thanksgiving dinner's main course? There's Turkey, Texas, with 496 residents; Turkey Creek, Louisiana, with 357 residents, and Turkey, North Carolina, with 267 residents. There are also eight places and townships named Cranberry, and 20 places named Plymouth, after the location of the first Thanksgiving.

Sandie from SC
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11/23/13 8:12 A

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Nov 23, 1936:
First issue of Life is published

On November 23, 1936, the first issue of the pictorial magazine Life was published, featuring a cover photo of the Fort Peck Dam by Margaret Bourke-White.

Life actually had its start earlier in the 20th century as a different kind of magazine: a weekly humor publication, not unlike today's The New Yorker in its use of tart cartoons, humorous pieces and cultural reporting. When the original Life folded during the Great Depression, the influential American publisher Henry Luce bought the name and re-launched the magazine as a picture-based periodical on this day in 1936. By this time, Luce had already enjoyed great success as the publisher of Time, a weekly news magazine.

From his high school days, Luce was a newsman, serving with his friend Briton Hadden as managing editors of their school newspaper. This partnership continued through their college years at Yale University, where they acted as chairmen and managing editors of the Yale Daily News, as well as after college, when Luce joined Hadden at The Baltimore News in 1921. It was during this time that Luce and Hadden came up with the idea for Time. When it launched in 1923, it was with the intention of delivering the world's news through the eyes of the people who made it.

Whereas the original mission of Time was to tell the news, the mission of Life was to show it. In the words of Luce himself, the magazine was meant to provide a way for the American people "to see life; to see the world; to eyewitness great events ... to see things thousands of miles away... to see and be amazed; to see and be instructed... to see, and to show..." Luce set the tone of the magazine with Margaret Bourke-White's stunning cover photograph of the Fort Peck Dam, which has since become an icon of the 1930's and the great public works completed under President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal.

Life was an overwhelming success in its first year of publication. Almost overnight, it changed the way people looked at the world by changing the way people could look at the world. Its flourish of images painted vivid pictures in the public mind, capturing the personal and the public, and putting it on display for the world to take in. At its peak, Life had a circulation of over 8 million and it exerted considerable influence on American life in the beginning and middle of the 20th century.

With picture-heavy content as the driving force behind its popularity,the magazine suffered as television became society's predominant means of communication. Life ceased running as a weekly publication in 1972, when it began losing audience and advertising dollars to television. In 2004, however, it resumed weekly publication as a supplement to U.S. newspapers. At its re-launch, its combined circulation was once again in the millions

from: This Day in History

Sandie from SC
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11/10/13 7:26 A

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USMC Day

USMC Day celebrates the birth of the United States Marine Corps. The Marine Corps were created during the Revolutionary War.

The Continental Congress of the newly created United States of America, authorized the creation of the Continental Marines on November 10, 1775. It was later renamed the U.S. Marine Corps. It is often abbreviated as USMC.

The Marine Corps has proudly participated in every war that has involved the United States.

If you see a Marine today, thank them for their contributions to protecting our country. Active or retired, they deserve our thanks and appreciation.


Sandie from SC
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11/8/13 7:14 A

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Nov 8, 1895:
German scientist discovers X-rays

On this day in 1895, physicist Wilhelm Conrad Rontgen (1845-1923) becomes the first person to observe X-rays, a significant scientific advancement that would ultimately benefit a variety of fields, most of all medicine, by making the invisible visible. Rontgen's discovery occurred accidentally in his Wurzburg, Germany, lab, where he was testing whether cathode rays could pass through glass when he noticed a glow coming from a nearby chemically coated screen. He dubbed the rays that caused this glow X-rays because of their unknown nature.

Rontgen's discovery was labeled a medical miracle and X-rays soon became an important diagnostic tool in medicine, allowing doctors to see inside the human body for the first time without surgery. In 1897, X-rays were first used on a military battlefield, during the Balkan War, to find bullets and broken bones inside patients.

During the 1930s, 40s and 50s many American shoe stores featured shoe-fitting fluoroscopes that used to X-rays to enable customers to see the bones in their feet. It wasn't until the 1950s that this practice was determined to be risky business. Wilhelm Rontgen received numerous accolades for his work, including the first Nobel Prize in physics in 1901, yet he remained modest and never tried to patent his discovery. Today, X-ray technology is widely used in medicine, material analysis and devices such as airport security scanners.


from: This Day in History

Sandie from SC
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Friday, November 1, 2013
FACE MASK DAY

For as long as ice hockey has been played - since 1855 in North America, and the 16th century in the Netherlands - goalies have been getting their faces smashed by flying hockey pucks.

On this day in 1959, Jacques Plante had had enough! The goalie for the Montreal Canadiens had been hit again and had to have seven more stitches added to his face. This time, however, he returned to the ice wearing a plastic face mask. Plante had made it out of fiberglass and resin. His design was so popular, that goalies throughout the National Hockey League followed suit.

The face mask is now standard issue. Thanks to Jacques Plante, goalies have more teeth and we hardly ever know what they really look like.



Sandie from SC
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10/28/13 6:35 A

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Oct 28, 1965:

Gateway Arch completed

On this day in 1965, construction is completed on the Gateway Arch, a spectacular 630-foot-high parabola of stainless steel marking the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial on the waterfront of St. Louis, Missouri.

The Gateway Arch, designed by Finnish-born, American-educated architect Eero Saarinen, was erected to commemorate President Thomas Jefferson's Louisiana Purchase of 1803 and to celebrate St. Louis' central role in the rapid westward expansion that followed. As the market and supply point for fur traders and explorers—including the famous Meriwether Lewis and William Clark—the town of St. Louis grew exponentially after the War of 1812, when great numbers of people began to travel by wagon train to seek their fortunes west of the Mississippi River. In 1947-48, Saarinen won a nationwide competition to design a monument honoring the spirit of the western pioneers. In a sad twist of fate, the architect died of a brain tumor in 1961 and did not live to see the construction of his now-famous arch, which began in February 1963. Completed in October 1965, the Gateway Arch cost less than $15 million to build. With foundations sunk 60 feet into the ground, its frame of stressed stainless steel is built to withstand both earthquakes and high winds. An internal tram system takes visitors to the top, where on a clear day they can see up to 30 miles across the winding Mississippi and to the Great Plains to the west. In addition to the Gateway Arch, the Jefferson Expansion Memorial includes the Museum of Westward Expansion and the Old Courthouse of St. Louis, where two of the famous Dred Scott slavery cases were heard in the 1860s.

Today, some 4 million people visit the park each year to wander its nearly 100 acres, soak up some history and take in the breathtaking views from Saarinen's gleaming arch


Sandie from SC
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10/17/13 5:30 A

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fyi: The term “junk food” was initially used in the 1960s butwas popularized during the following decade when the song “Junk Food Junkie” reached the top of the charts in 1976




Sandie from SC
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10/16/13 7:55 A

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fyi:
The Tootsie Roll is named after its creator Leo Hirshfield’s daughter Clara, whose nickname was Tootsie. It was the first penny candy that was individually wrapped. During WWII, Tootsie Rolls were placed in soldiers’ ration kits because it could survive various weather conditions

Sandie from SC
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10/8/13 10:13 A

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1871 Chicago Fire


When Mrs. O’Leary’s cow kicked over a lantern in the barn on this day in 1871, it was no laughing matter. The barn, on DeKoven Street in Chicago, caught fire. The fire spread, scorching almost four square miles,
killing about 300 people and leaving a path of destruction valued at over two hundred million dollars -- a lot of dollars for that time.

Of course, Patrick & Mrs. O’Leary’s barn was destroyed; as were 17,450 other buildings, leaving almost 99,000 people homeless. The city of Chicago was virtually leveled. And out of the ashes, a phoenix, in the guise of a steel and concrete Chicago, rose -- all because of one cow.

Now, more than 125 years later, a history buff, Richard Bales, says it may not have been Mrs. O’Leary’s cow, after all. It seems that Daniel ‘Peg Leg’ Sullivan, a neighbor of the O’Leary’s, was in the barn feeding his mother’s cow. He either kicked over a lantern or dropped a match or pipe, setting the famous fire. Sullivan, who had been questioned about the fire, said he was across the street when he saw the fire break out. A two-story building would have blocked his view. So, Bales theorizes that Sullivan lied and was the cause of the fire, rather than Mrs. O’Leary’s cow.

You’ll have to draw your own conclusion about the Great Chicago Fire.

From: Janey's Daily Dose

Sandie from SC
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Monday, September 16, 2013
MAYFLOWER DAY

On this day, in the year 1620, 102 passengers and crew set sail on the ocean blue from Plymouth, England.

Their destination was the New World. And, although they encountered stormy weather and treacherous seas, this hearty group of 41 men, the rest, women and children; half religious dissenters and half entrepreneurs, made it to Provincetown, Massachusetts on November 21, 1620.

A month later, the Plymouth Colony was founded by the passengers of the Mayflower.

from: Those Were the Days



Sandie from SC
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Friday, September 13, 2013
CANDY KISSES DAY

Pull the little paper sticking out of the foil. That’s right. Now carefully unwrap the silver foil. Voila! A milk-chocolate delight; and just one of the many chocolate products produced by the Hershey Chocolate Company.

Milton S. Hershey was born on this day in 1857. By the time he was in his mid-30s he had developed the ’Great American Chocolate Bar’-- or Hershey Bar as it is known throughout the world. This bar of solid milk chocolate became the foundation of his company and his fortune; and the foundation of Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Milton Hershey would be proud to know that the sweet cocoa smell of chocolate still permeates his hometown and home of the Hershey Chocolate Factory.

He would also find that some Hershey hotel guest rooms include cocoa butter soap as an amenity. And the street lights are in the shape of chocolate candy kisses.

frpmL Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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9/10/13 12:12 A

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Tuesday, September 10, 2013
GUNSMOKE DAY


Actor James Arness brought Marshall Matt Dillon to life on this night in1955. Gunsmoke debuted on CBS-TV and went on to become the longest-running (20 years) series on television. The pioneer in adult westerns also starred Milburn Stone as Doc Adams, Amanda Blake as Miss Kitty Russell, and Dennis Weaver as Chester Goode. Other well-known performers joined the cast throughout the years -- Ken Curtis as Festus Hagan and Burt Reynolds as Quint Asper, the town blacksmith, were two favorites.

Gunsmoke had enjoyed a radio run of three years with William Conrad (Cannon) playing Marshall Dillon before the TV version went on the air. The two ran simultaneously for six more years. An interesting note: CBS’ first choice for the role of the resolute, determined Matt Dillon was John Wayne. Wayne did not want to become involved with a weekly TV show at the time and suggested his friend, James Arness. The suggestion was magic. Arness, the only cast member other than Milburn Stone to stay in the role for the full twenty years, became Matt Dillon. The casting couldn’t have been better.

The show was saved from cancellation in the 1960s when its popularity had waned. CBS owner William S. Paley, a fan of Gunsmoke, demanded the the western be put on the fall schedule.

Not only was Gunsmoke the longest-running series with a regular cast of characters; but when it finally did meet its demise, it was the last of the network Westerns to go.


from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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Monday, September 9, 2013
COLONEL SANDERS DAY


Celebrating his 6th birthday (he was born in 1890) on this day, Harland Sanders had no way of knowing that he was destined to become one of the most recognizable men in the world. A short time after his birthday, his father died, and a very young boy became his mother’s support system. He took care of his baby brother and sister and did the cooking while his mother went to work ... and he became quite an accomplished cook in quick order.
After his mother remarried when he was 12, he went to work at a multitude of different jobs, ending up operating a gas station in Corbin, Kentucky. It was here, at the age of 40, that Harland started cooking seriously. Using recipes he had learned at the tender age of six, he would prepare meals for hungry travelers serving them in his gas-station living quarters. His food was so popular that he finally had to open a restaurant. Over the next decade, Sanders tried and tested, and again, tried and tested his fried chicken recipe until he perfected the 11 herbs and spices that made up his secret blend that is still tempting taste-buds in Kentucky, and now, throughout the world.

Sanders’ cooking had such a following that, in 1935, he was made a Kentucky Colonel for his contributions to Kentucky cuisine. Four years later his restaurant was listed inAdventures in Good Eating by Duncan Hines. However, it wasn’t until 1955, when an interstate highway was to bypass Corbin, Kentucky, and Harland Sanders was living on only $105 a month from Social Security, that he took to the road to franchise his chicken recipe and restaurant concept.

The first franchises were established by a handshake. Sanders traveled across the United States, stopping at restaurants to fry up batches of his chicken. If the owner and employees liked the dish, they shook Sanders’ hand, and paid him a nickel for every chicken they sold. By 1964, there were over 600 of the Colonel’s franchises in the U.S. and Canada. The 74-year-old Sanders sold his interest that year for $2,000,000, remaining on as its spokesperson until his death in 1980.

The image of the Kentucky Colonel still graces the signage at thousands of restaurants throughout the world. Harland Sanders would be pleased to know that we’re still enjoying his special flavors every time we order a bucket of original recipe, crispy crust or tender-roast chicken from KFC.


from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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9/6/13 7:59 A

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DINNER, NEWS AND WALTER DAY

Walter Cronkite started showing up in living rooms during the dinner hour, starting this night in (Sepember 6) 1963 as anchor of the CBS Evening News (a job he took over from Douglas Edwards on April 16, 1962). Previous to this night, CBS Evening News had been shown from 7:30-7:45 p.m. and 7:15-7:30 p.m.

A familiar face to TV audiences, Walter Cronkite had been the host of You Are There, a CBS Sunday night program that ran from 1953 through 1957. A CBS news correspondent, Walter Cronkite served as reporter, host, and anchorman as major events in history were reenacted. Those who were viewers of You Are There can probably still recite Walter’s closing lines: “What sort of a day was it? A day like all days, filled with those events that alter and illuminate our times ... and you were there.”

His CBS Evening News with Walter Cronkite won a multitude of Emmy Awards. Walter, himself, took home several individual Emmys for Outstanding Achievement Within Regularly Scheduled News Programs; specifically, for The Watergate Affair and Coverage of the Shooting of Governor Wallace in 1972-1973; and Solzhenitsyn, a CBS News Special in 1974. When the Emmy Awards were presented on September 9, 1979, Walter Cronkite received the coveted ATAS Governor’s Award.

Walter Cronkite, voted the ‘most trusted man in America’, left "CBS Evening News" on March 6, 1981. Throughout his retirement years, Cronkite continued to report special news events. On July 17, 2009, Walter Cronkite and news as we knew it died. "And that's the way it is...”


from, Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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9/5/13 6:30 A

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Thursday, September 5, 2013

RED CROSS DAY

The first disaster relief provided by the American Red Cross benefited thousands of fire victims left destitute this day by the Great Fire of 1881.
It had been a long hot summer in the ‘thumb-area’ of Michigan and small forest fires were burning. A southwest gale fanned the flames into an inferno. The fire raged for three days, scorching over a million acres. 282 people died in the blaze.

The American Association for the Relief of Misery on the Battlefields was a result of the International Red Cross and the forerunner of the American Association of the Red Cross. Clara Barton was instrumental in establishing the American chapter in 1881.

Over one hundred nations now have Red Cross associations. Each national society carries on its own program; however, all are united in their aim to prevent misery in time of war or peace and serve all people, regardless of race, nationality or religion.

The Red Cross flag (white background with a red cross) is the reverse of Switzerland’s flag where the first Red Cross was founded in 1863 ... and that’s how the organization got its name.

from: Those Were the Days


Sandie from SC
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9/2/13 12:24 A

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First ATM opens for business

On this day, September 2, in 1969, America's first automatic teller machine (ATM) makes its public debut, dispensing cash to customers at Chemical Bank in Rockville Center, New York. ATMs went on to revolutionize the banking industry, eliminating the need to visit a bank to conduct basic financial transactions. By the 1980s, these money machines had become widely popular and handled many of the functions previously performed by human tellers, such as check deposits and money transfers between accounts. Today, ATMs are as indispensable to most people as cell phones and e-mail.

Several inventors worked on early versions of a cash-dispensing machine, but Don Wetzel, an executive at Docutel, a Dallas company that developed automated baggage-handling equipment, is generally credited as coming up with the idea for the modern ATM. Wetzel reportedly conceived of the concept while waiting on line at a bank. The ATM that debuted in New York in 1969 was only able to give out cash, but in 1971, an ATM that could handle multiple functions, including providing customers' account balances, was introduced.

ATMs eventually expanded beyond the confines of banks and today can be found everywhere from gas stations to convenience stores to cruise ships. There is even an ATM at McMurdo Station in Antarctica. Non-banks lease the machines (so-called "off premise" ATMs) or own them outright.

Today there are well over 1 million ATMs around the world, with a new one added approximately every five minutes. It's estimated that more than 170 Americans over the age of 18 had an ATM card in 2005 and used it six to eight times a month. Not surprisingly, ATMs get their busiest workouts on Fridays.

from: ThisDayinHistory


Sandie from SC
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8/26/13 6:18 A

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August 26 - First televised major league baseball game emoticon

On this day in 1939, the first televised Major League baseball game is broadcast on station W2XBS, the station that was to become WNBC-TV. Announcer Red Barber called the game between the Cincinnati Reds and the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field in Brooklyn, New York. It's estimated that 3,000 people watched the game on TV. The Reds won the opening game of the doubleheader, 5-2. The Dodgers came back to take the second game 6-1.

Sandie from SC
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8/24/13 6:19 A

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August 24-25, 1814 - During the War of 1812, Washington, D.C., was invaded by British forces that burned the Capitol, the White House and most other public buildings along with a number of private homes. The burning was in retaliation for the earlier American burning of York (Toronto).

Sandie from SC
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8/23/13 7:04 A

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August 23 - Fannie Farmer opens cooking school

On this day in 1902, pioneering cookbook author Fannie Farmer, who changed the way Americans prepare food by advocating the use of standardized measurements in recipes, opens Miss Farmer's School of Cookery in Boston. In addition to teaching women about cooking, Farmer later educated medical professionals about the importance of proper nutrition for the sick.

Farmer died January 15, 1915, at age 57. After Farmer's death, Alice Bradley, who taught at Miss Farmer's School of Cookery, took over the business and ran it until the mid-1940s. The Fannie Farmer Cookbook is still in print today.


Sandie from SC
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8/20/13 9:07 A

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emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon

Aug 20, 1920: Professional football is born

On this day in 1920, seven men, including legendary all-around athlete and football star Jim Thorpe, meet to organize a professional football league at the Jordan and Hupmobile Auto Showroom in Canton, Ohio. The meeting led to the creation of the American Professional Football Conference (APFC), the forerunner to the hugely successful National Football League.

Professional football developed in the 1890s in Pennsylvania, as local athletic clubs engaged in increasingly intense competition. Former Yale football star William "Pudge" Heffelfinger became the first-ever professional football player when he was hired by the Allegheny Athletic Association to play in a game against their rival the Pittsburgh Athletic Club in November 1892. By 1896, the Allegheny Athletic Association was made up entirely of paid players, making it the sport’s first-ever professional team. As football became more and more popular, local semi-pro and pro teams were organized across the country.

Professional football first proved itself a viable spectator sport in the 1910s with the establishment of The Ohio League. Canton, the premiere team in the league, featured legendary decathlete and football star Jim Thorpe. From his play with the Carlisle School to his gold medal in the decathlon in Stockholm in 1912 and his time in the outfield with John McGraw’s New York Giants, Thorpe was an international star who brought legitimacy to professional football. The crowds that Thorpe and the Canton team drew created a market for professional football in Ohio and beyond. Still, the league was struggling due to escalating player salaries, a reliance on college players who then had to forfeit their college eligibility and a general lack of organization.

On August 20, 1920, the owners of four Ohio League teams--the Akron Pros, Canton Bulldogs, Cleveland Indians and Dayton Triangles--met to form a new professional league. Jim Thorpe was nominated as president of the new league, as it was hoped Thorpe’s fame would help the league to be taken seriously. On September 17, the league met again, changing its short-lived name to the American Professional Football Association (APFA) and officially electing Jim Thorpe as the league’s first president.

The APFA began play on September 26, with the Rock Island Independents of Illinois defeating a team from outside the league, the St. Paul Ideals, 48-0. A week later, Dayton beat Columbus 14-0 in the first game between two teams from the APFA, the forerunner of the modern NFL

fromL History.com

Sandie from SC
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8/11/13 8:22 A

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This is long, but interesting...

Sunday, August 11, 2013
...---... DAY

The international distress call, SOS, which replaced CQD (All stations -- distress!), was first used by an American ship on this day in 1909. The ocean liner Arapahoe found itself in trouble off Cape Hatteras, NC. The ship’s wireless operator, T. D. Haubner, radioed for help when his ship lost its screw propeller near the ‘Graveyard of the Atlantic’,Diamond Shoals. The call was heard by the United Wireless station at Hatteras.

Contrary to popular opinion, SOS (which has no stops between the letters, the signal being a continuous signal of three dots, three dashes and three dots) is not an acronym for any series of words such as Save Our Ship or Save Our Souls. The original call for distress began with the British CQ, meaning “All Stations”, used by telegraph and cable operators worldwide. The D for’distress’ was added to CQ by the Marconi company in 1904.

In 1906, at the Berlin Radiotelegraphic Conference, the German’s general inquiry call, SOE, was suggested as an international distress signal. Changing the E to S gave the signal its unmistakeable character, and SOS was officially ratified as the international distress signal in 1908, although it was not officially adopted by the USA until 1912 (prompted by the Titanic tragedy). It is interesting to note that the Titanic’s radio operator sent Marconi’s CQD code several times before using the four-year-old international SOS signal some twenty minutes later ... as Marconi waited in NY to make the return trip to England on the ill-fated ship.

Globe Wireless, a Louisiana company, began operation that same year, as rules and regulations following the sinking of theTitanic included the requirement that all ships carry equipment capable of sending and receiving Morse code messages. On July 12, 1999, Globe Wireless broadcast its last Morse code message to ships, five months after Morse code was no longer an internationally acceptable form of communication for ships at sea. Globe’s was the last service of its kind in North America.

Morse code and its SOS signal began its demise in the 1960s as faster more efficient forms of transmission became available. Today, most ships use mobile phones, fax machines, and e-mail to communicate. The Global Maritime Distress and Safety system, which uses the satellite-based Global Positioning System, is now the internationally accepted manner in which to transmit a ship’s exact location and problem ... instantly.

In comparison, SOS and other Morse code transmissions which were the high tech methods of 1909, were “very slow, unreliable ... if you’re lucky, you can send 25 words a minute”, stated Globe Wireless Manager Karl Halvorsen. His and other similar companies around the world now provide the instant message services to ships that are used on land.

SOS ...---... Morse code is sinking.

from" Those WereTheDays


Sandie from SC
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8/10/13 6:19 A

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Saturday, August 10, 2013
SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION DAY

The famous Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. was established on this day in 1846by the United States Congress as an institute of learning.

An Englishman, James Smithson, made it possible to create the institute with his generous monetary gift of $500,000; hence, the name, Smithsonian.

The Smithsonian Institution supports a wide variety of research projects and publications. It also houses the national museums of natural history, technology, art and history. One of the most popular is the National Air Museum which contains the Wright Brothers original biplane and Charles Lindbergh’s plane, The Spirit of St. Louis.

Often referred to as America’s attic, the Smithsonian has a little something for everyone from every era and pertaining to all subject matter. You’ll even find Archie Bunker’s chair at the Smithsonian Institution.


from: Those Were The Days



Sandie from SC
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8/8/13 11:44 A

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Lights go on at Wrigley emoticon


On this day in 1988, the Chicago Cubs host the first night game in the history of Wrigley Field.

The first-ever night game in professional baseball took place nearly 60 years earlier, on May 2, 1930, when a Des Moines, Iowa, team hosted Wichita for a Western League game. The match-up drew 12,000 people at a time when Des Moines was averaging just 600 fans per game. Evening games soon became popular in the minors. The major leagues, took five years to catch up to their small-town counterparts.


The first big league night game took place in Cincinnati, Ohio, on May 24, 1935, and drew 25,000 fans. The crowd stood by as President Franklin D. Roosevelt symbolically switched on the lights from Washington, D.C. To capitalize on their new evening fan base, the Reds played a night game that year against every National League team--eight games in total--and despite their lousy record of 68-85, paid attendance rose 117 percent. Over the next 13 seasons, the rest of the major league parks followed suit, with one exception, Wrigley Field, which by 1988 was the second oldest ballpark in use after Boston’s Fenway Park. For 74 seasons, the Cubs played only day games at home. Finally, on August 8, 1988, the Cubs played the Philadelphia Phillies in the park’s first night game.


Today, the Cubs are the only major league team that still plays the majority of its home games during the day.

Sandie from SC
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8/7/13 6:02 A

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Wednesday, August 7, 2013
PURPLE HEART DAY

U.S. General George Washington wanted to honor several courageous soldiers of the revolutionary war with a Badge of Military Merit. So, on this day in1782, he ordered the creation of a purple, cloth heart with a silver, braided edge. The Badge of Military Merit was only awarded to three Revolutionary War soldiers.

On the bicentennial of the first U.S. President’s birthday, February 22, 1932, the badge was reinstated. This time it was called the Order of the Purple Heart, a purple-enameled, gold-bordered heart with a profile of Washington in the center.

The Purple Heart decorates those members of the United States armed forces who have been wounded in battle (if they die, it is awarded to their next of kin)
from: Those WereThe Days

Sandie from SC
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8/6/13 8:10 A

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Tuesday, August 6, 2013
CY YOUNG DAY

Denton ‘Cy’ Young pitched his first major-league baseball game on this day in 1890. He led the Cleveland Spiders past the Chicago White Sox. Young went on to enjoy a great baseball career, winning a total of 511 games (95 more than second place Walter Johnson) ... averaging more than 23 victories over 22 seasons, playing for Cleveland, St. Louis, and Boston (where he played in the first World Series, and won).

The Cy Young Award was established in 1956, when the Baseball Writer’s Association of America bestowed the honor on the best pitcher in major-league baseball for that year. The award has been presented every year since. In fact, from 1967 on, two Cy Young awards have been presented annually to the best pitcher in each major league.

Where did Denton get the nickname, Cy? It seems that Denton Young, a six-foot, two-inch, 210-pound player, could throw a re-e-e-ally fast curve ball, kind of like a cyclonespinning through the air. A story told about the Baseball Hall of Famer says that one time, before a game, he was warming up by throwing balls at a wooden fence. Afterwards, a remark was made that the fence looked like a cyclone had hit it. Yeah! A cyclone named Denton Young aka Cy.

from: ThoseWereTheDays

Sandie from SC
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8/1/13 12:18 A

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August 1, 1838 - Slavery was abolished in Jamaica. It had been introduced by Spanish settlers 300 years earlier in 1509.

August 1, 1944 - Anne Frank penned her last entry into her diary. "[I] keep on trying to find a way of becoming what I would like to be, and what I could be, if...there weren't any other people living in the world." Three days later, Anne and her family were arrested and sent to Nazi concentration camps. Anne died at Bergen-Belsen concentration camp on March 15, 1945, at age 15.

Sandie from SC
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7/26/13 10:35 A

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Friday, July 26, 2013
POST OFFICE DAY

On this day in 1775, a postal system was established by the 2nd Continental Congress of the United States. The first Postmaster General was the same gentleman who graces the U.S. $100 bill and who flew a kite with a key attached in a thunderstorm --Benjamin Franklin. Mr. Franklin was paid $1,000 a year for his job as Postmaster General.

Just fifty-four years later, the U.S. Post Office had grown to 7,600 offices and in some places, especially big cities, lines of people were kept waiting as postal clerks determined correct postal charges. Citizens were angered over the long lines and by the U.S. Government’s enforcement of postal rates.

Here we are, over 200 years later, still complaining about postal rates while we wait in long lines at the post office.

from: ThoseWereTheDays

Sandie from SC
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7/24/13 7:45 A

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Wednesday, July 24, 2013
PINE-TARRED BAT DAY

On this day in 1983, Kansas City Royals slugger George Brett slammed a two-run homer with two outs in the ninth inning to give the Royals a 5-4 lead over New York. Or did he?
Seconds after Brett crossed home plate, New York Yankees Manager Billy Martin came out of the dugout to protest that the pine tar on Brett’s bat was more than 18 inches up the bat handle. The umpires measured Brett’s bat, using home plate as a measuring rod, and came to the conclusion that Martin was correct -- and called Brett out -- erasing the Royals lead. Or did they?

The president of the American League, Lee McPhail, later reversed the umpires’ decision on the pine tar and ruled that the game was suspended --with the Royals leading, 5-4. The game was completed 3 1/2 weeks later, on August 18, 1983, in Yankee Stadium. The outcome of the game? It only took 12 minutes to play the remainder of the contest with the Royals tarring the Yankees 5-4.


from: ThoseWereTheDays


Sandie from SC
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7/20/13 3:26 A

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GIANT LEAP DAY
July 20

With “...one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind,” astronaut, Neil Armstrong, pilot of the lunar spacecraft, the Eagle, made the first footsteps on the surface of the moon at 10:56 p.m. EDT on this day in1969. Which foot did Armstrong use to step on the grainy, grayish, lunar soil? His left.

So incredible were the TV images of Armstrong and (15 minutes) later, Buzz Aldrin, exploring the lunar surface, people around the world stopped and collectively held their breath. The words “Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed...” gave instant impact to the drama of watching human beings reach something so far away so successfully. And all were able to breathe once again.

The American flag that was deployed along with other moon-landing memorabilia, some 106 items in all, still sits on the moon as abandoned space junk. While Armstrong and Aldrin cavorted on the moon, astronaut Michael Collins piloted the Apollo 11 command ship, Columbia, above the moon’s surface.

The world again stopped -- in anticipation of the fragile lunar module lifting off from the moon and rejoining the command ship -- reuniting the three astronauts for a most historic trip home to planet Earth.

from: ThoseWereTheDays

Sandie from SC
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7/18/13 6:59 A

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Thursday, July 18, 2013
WIENERMOBILE DAY

Every now and then a commercial jingle becomes something other than a commercial. It becomes a part of Americana. And so it goes with the Oscar Mayer Wiener Jingle (“I wish I were an Oscar Mayer Wiener...”). But long before the jingle/song entered our lives, Carl Mayer, nephew of Oscar Mayer, invented another quaint entry into Americana: the Oscar Mayer Wienermobile.


The first Wienermobile rolled out of General Body Company’s factory in Chicago on this day in 1936. The Wienermobile tours around the U.S. fascinating children of all ages as it promotes the famous Oscar Mayer wiener. If you’ve had the pleasure of seeing the Wienermobile in person, don’t think only the folks in your part of the U.S.A. are the fortunate ones, because today there are six of the silly-looking cars.


from: ThoseWereTheDays

Sandie from SC
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7/9/13 7:09 A

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Tuesday, July 9, 2013
LET’S SEW DAY

Who invented the sewing machine? Elias Howe, you say? Well, we were all taught that Elias Howe was the clever inventor; but that’s not exactly correct. Elias Howe only patented the lock stitch sewing machine. The device had already been invented by one Walter Hunt.

Walter was a really nice guy. He didn’t patent his invention because he didn’t want to put the many seamstresses of the time out of work. Elias didn’t care about such social issues. So he went ahead and patented the sewing machine.

Mr. Howe, however, ran into a lot of legal entanglements trying to get his patent rights because of those who tried to infringe on them, such as Isaac Singer. Maybe you know the name. In the long run, Elias Howe won; earning over two million dollars in royalties for his non-invention.

The question is, if Elias Howe hadn’t been born on this day in 1819, what would we be sewing with?

from: ThoseWereTheDays

Sandie from SC
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6/25/13 8:41 A

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Wednesday, June 26, 2013
TOP OF THE WORLD DAY

Early into the 1970s, the folks in Toronto, Canada were having problems with their TV and radio reception. Interference from the many skyscrapers being built in the city were causing TV shows to be superimposed on top of each other. To remedy the situation, the Canadian National Railway Company was commissioned to build an antenna that would tower over every building ever built. The antenna design turned into a tourist attraction design by John Andrews Architects and Webb Zerafa Menkes Housden Architects; and after 40 months, the completed CN Toweropened ... on this day in 1976.

63 million dollars and 1,537 people were needed to complete the tallest free standing structure and building in the world (until 2007). The CN (Canadian National) Tower, including the 335 foot (102 meters), steel, broadcasting antenna, is 1,815 feet, 5 inches tall (553.33 meters). At 1,465 feet, you’ll be standing on an incredibly high public observation deck, the Space Deck. You can take one of six elevators to the Sky Pod level at a speed of 15 miles per hour. After your 58-second-long trip, you can take another elevator inside the tower to the Space Deck. Or, you could climb the 1769 steps up the tower. You’ll have the distinction of dining in the world’s highest and largest revolving restaurant, aptly named "360", the home of the world’s highest wine cellar. Wine cellars are usually under the building, this one’s on top of the world!

Sixteen Toronto TV and FM radio stations broadcast their signals from the antenna ... and all over Southern Ontario, Canada, TV viewers and radio listeners can see and hear clearly, all because of the CN Tower ... Toronto’s favorite tourist attraction.


from: Those Were the Days

Edited by: GMASANDIE at: 6/25/2013 (08:41)
Sandie from SC
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6/17/13 7:01 A

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Monday, June 17, 2013
COMMERCIAL TV DAY

On this day in 1941, WNBT-TV, channel 4 in New York City, was granted the first construction permit to operate a commercial TV station in the United States. (WNBT signed on the air on July 1, 1941 at 1:29 p.m.)

Owned by Radio Corporation of America (RCA), the station later changed its call letters to WRCA. As RCA developed the NBC Television Network and, especially, TV in‘living’ color in the early 1950s, WRCA, as well as its TV counterpart in Los Angeles, KRCA-TV 4 (channel 4), changed call letters once again. To reflect the impact of network television, the station became WNBC-TV. On the west coast, KRCA was changed to KNBC-TV.

Both stations remain the flagships of NBC television and are wholly-owned subsidiaries of the television network.

And both are truly commercial TV stations, as are all network TV stations these days (along with cable TV stations that, as we remember it, were originally supposed to be non-commercial).


from: ThoseWeretheDays


Sandie from SC
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6/16/13 7:26 A

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First roller coaster in America opens

On this day in 1884, the first roller coaster in America opens at Coney Island, in Brooklyn, New York. Known as a switchback railway, it was the brainchild of LaMarcus Thompson. It traveled approximately six miles per hour.

Passengers seated sideways rode a train on undulating tracks over a wooden structure 600 feet long. The train started at a height of 50 feet on one end and ran downhill by gravity until its momentum died. Passengers left the train and attendants pushed the cars over a switch to a higher level. The passengers then returned to their seats and rode back to the original starting point. Admission was 5 cents and Thompson grossed an average of $600 / day.

The new entertainment was an instant success and by the turn of the century there were hundreds of roller coasters around the country.

Sandie from SC
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Sunday, June 16, 2013
MY LITTLE MARGIE DAY

Gale Storm (Margie Albright) and Charles Farrell (Vernon Albright) starred in My Little Margie which debuted on CBS-TV on this day in 1952.
Fans of the popular comedy will remember that My Little Margie was based at the Carlton Arms Hotel, Apartment 10-A. Vern Albright was a very eligible widower who worked for the investment firm of Honeywell and Todd. Margie Albright, his 21-year-old daughter, was continually scheming to help dad and continually causing big trouble while helping.

The show made the unusual move from television to radio in December, 1952, airing original, not simulcast, versions on the radio. Gale Storm and Charles Farrell starred in the radio series as well. My Little Margie skipped around the TV networks, going from CBS after four months to NBC-TV, back to CBS-TV in January of 1953 and then back to NBC in September of that year. year.

The sitcom met its demise in August 1955, just in time for Margie AKA Gale Storm to move into a singing career. I Hear You Knocking, Ivory Tower,Teen Age Prayer, Why Do Fools Fall in Love and Dark Moon made it to the pop charts after My Little Margie made it into our memory banks.

I remember well "My Little Margie"

Sandie from SC
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6/15/13 12:04 A

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Saturday, June 15, 2013

GO FLY A KITE DAY

It was a dark and stormy night back in 1752. Since there was nothing on TV worth a darn and, since he had been wondering if there really was electricity up in those dark clouds, Benjamin Franklin tied an iron wire to his kite and let it sail. He flew the kite from a long piece of twine tied to a silk ribbon on the end. Franklin attached a metal key where the twine and silk met.
Ben, not being a total dummy, flew the kite high in the wind, but stood in a doorway so the silk ribbon (and he) would not get wet. His idea was that any electricity overhead would be attracted to the wire on top of the kite. It was lucky for Franklin that no actual lightning bolt struck the wire or Ben would have been toast! However, as lightning began to flash, he put his hand near the key and sparks flew. The test was a success!

Franklin used his discovery to start a new business. He made and sold lightning rods. These metal rods were attached to the tops of buildings. A wire ran down the side of the structure to the ground. When lightning struck the top of the rod, it ran down the wire and safely to ground without doing damage to the building. Benjamin Franklin’s kite flying and, subsequently, lightning rods have prevented many buildings from going up in smoke.


from:ThoseWereTheDays


Sandie from SC
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emoticon PERFECT GAME DAY
Thursday, June 13, 2013

Baseball’s first El Perfecto, a perfect game, was recorded on this day in 1880 ... a perfect game being when no batter reaches a base during a complete game of at least nine innings.
A southpaw, left-handed Lee Richmond of the Worcester (Massachusetts) Ruby Legs, pitched himself to perfection with a 1-0 shutout of the Cleveland Spiders in a National League game. Five days later, on June 17, the second, official perfect game was pitched by John Ward in another National League game between Providence and Buffalo.

It was two and a half decades later before this feat was accomplished again. This time, the now famous Cy Young of the Boston Red Sox, stopped the Philadelphia Athletics in an American League game.

Perfect game days are very rare! So if you get a chance to see one, either in person or on TV, you’ll be watching history in the makin



from:ThoseWereTheDays

Sandie from SC
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6/1/13 12:15 A

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Saturday, June 1, 2013
SUPERMAN DAY

The first issue of Action Comics was published on this day in 1938. In its pages was the world’s first super hero, Superman.

Jerry Siegel had a dream about the baby, Moses, who was abandoned by his parents in order that his life be saved. This dream prompted Siegel’s creation of the ‘Man of Steel’. Artist Joe Shuster made the comic book hero come alive. The first story, in this first issue, took place on the planet, Krypton, where baby Kal-El was born. The infant was shot to Earth in a rocket just before Krypton exploded.

We all know the rest of the story: the baby landed in Smalltown, U.S.A., was adopted by the Kent family and named, Clark. On Earth, Clark Kent had superhuman powers,“faster than a speeding bullet ... more powerful than a locomotive ... able to leap tall buildings at a single bound.” The only thing that could render him powerless was kryptonite, a green rock from the planet Krypton. Disguised as a timid, bespectacled reporter for Metropolis’ Daily Planet (with coworkers Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen and boss Perry White), Superman was determined to fight the “never-ending battle for truth, justice and the American way.”

Superman was born in a comic strip in 1938; but he continues to live in TV reruns, films starring Christopher Reeve and in the TV series, Lois and Clark.


from: ThoseWereTheDays


Sandie from SC
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5/16/13 7:32 A

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FIRST NICKEL DAY

The U.S. Treasury Department added another coin to American currency by authorizing the minting of the nickel, a five-cent coin, on this day in1866. On its face was a shield, while on the reverse was the number 5.

From 1883 until 1912, the head of Liberty was on the obverse while the Roman numeral 5 was on the reverse side..

In 1913, the U.S. Treasury minted nickels with Indian heads on one side
and buffaloes on the other.

The current nickel is the Jefferson nickel, minted since 1938. The Jefferson nickel has a profile of none other than Thomas Jefferson on the face and a picture of his home, Monticello, on the flip side.

Today’s nickel is made of only 25 percent nickel and 75 percent copper. Its official name is the five-cent piece. And that’s the latest from the 440 numismatic department.

From Those Were the Days

Edited by: GMASANDIE at: 5/16/2013 (07:32)
Sandie from SC
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4/24/13 6:58 A

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Wednesday, April 24, 2013
PIPELESS ORGAN DAY

It was on this date in Chicago, IL that Laurens Hammond announced news that would be favored by many churches across the United States. The news was the development of the pipeless organ -- and a granting of a U.S. patent for same. The year was 1934.

Hammond, a decades-old name in keyboard organs in churches, theaters, auditoriums and homes, is the same Hammond who fostered many of the developments that would make electronic keyboards so popular in modern music. The Hammond B-3 and B-5 organs, for example, became mainstays for many recording artists, while inventions in Hammond organ loud speaker development (the Hammond Leslie Tremelo speaker) produced still other important milestones that allowed small organs to emulate the big concert theater console organs.

Later, solid-state circuitry and computers allowed keyboards the flexibility to sound like other instruments, permitting the organist to play many instruments from the organ’s multiple keyboards.

And you thought there was an entire orchestra hiding in the closet ...


from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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4/21/13 7:58 A

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Sunday, April 21, 2013
KINDERGARTEN DAY

Some things we take for granted, like kindergarten. It’s just the first chance most kids get to attend a formal school, right? Wrong.

A man named Friedrich Froebel actually invented kindergarten. Little Freddie was born on this day in 1782 in Germany. He grew up to become a teacher, author and toy maker.
Friedrich’s experience as an educator led him to the conclusion that playtime can be very instructive; an essential part of a child’s education. He founded the first kindergarten for this purpose in 1837 in Blankenburg, Germany.

This directed playtime led to his invention of a series of toys that were designed to stimulate learning. He called these toys, gifts. The mother of famous architect, Frank Lloyd Wright gave her son some of these gifts ... in the form of maple wood blocks. Wright often spoke of the value the gifts had brought him throughout his life.

Nursery school and kindergarten as we know it are the direct results of the influence of
Friedrich Froebel. The first public kindergarten in the U.S. was started by Conrad Poppenhusen in College Point, Queens, New York in 1870

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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4/18/13 5:47 A

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Thursday, April 18, 2013
MIDNIGHT RIDE DAY

At about 10 p.m. on this day in 1775, three men took to their horses to ride from Boston to Concord, MA to warn the citizens of the approaching British army. Most of us know of just one of those riders, one Paul Revere. The famous poem, Paul Revere’s Ride byHenry Wadsworth Longfellow, glorified the Bostonian as the lone rider. He was, in fact, accompanied by William Dawes and Samuel Prescott.

We think it’s time they should get some recognition too! After all, it wasn’t their fault that their partner in the midnight ride was already well known, having been a member of the Sons of Liberty; incited the British by publishing an engraving of the Boston Massacre; carried messages for the Committees of Correspondence, an underground organization; and having been a participant in the Boston Tea Party.

Incidentally, only Prescott made it all the way to Concord. Revere was nabbed by a British cavalry patrol near Lexington, MA (Dawes and Prescott escaped). We’re not sure what happened to Dawes but Revere was released and returned to Lexington -- without his horse. There was lots of running/riding around that night, but suffice to say, when British forces arrived in Lexington, they found the minutemen waiting for them.

In honor of this midnight ride, get out your Revereware and make a pot of tea

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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4/15/13 6:49 A

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Monday, April 15, 2013
UNSINKABLE? DAY

The ‘unsinkable’ luxury liner, Titanic, sank at 2:27a.m. on this day in 1912. The largest passenger vessel in the world went under off the coast of Newfoundland two and one-half hours after striking an iceberg on its maiden voyage from Southampton, England to New York City.

A young David Sarnoff, later of RCA and NBC, relayed telegraph messages to advise relatives on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean of the 700+ survivors. 1,517 lives were lost at sea. One account claimed that lifeboats weren’t operable and those that were, quickly filled with male passengers and crew members, instead of the traditional women and children first.

Reports indicate that the captain of the Titanic, most of the crew and the ship’s orchestra remained on board as the huge luxury liner slid into the icy Atlantic. Still another report, from a survivor, indicated that as the great ship was going down to a watery grave, the orchestra playedNearer My God to Thee.


Many movies and documentaries about the monumental disaster have been filmed over the years. However, none had the exacting data gleaned by scientists from the 1986 expedition aboard Atlantis II. Dr. Robert Ballard headed a crew and a robot named Jason in a descent to the deck of the Titanic aboard Alvin, a submersible craft. They returned with information and photos that challenged and verified stories from the past.

After years of studying the facts, the 1997 Academy Award-winning film, Titanic, recreated the ship to the tiniest detail including the design on the elegant china. Although the film’s love story is fictitious, the true tragedy of the Titanic can now be seen by the world some eight decades later.

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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4/13/13 6:48 A

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Saturday, April 13, 2013
Thomas Jefferson's Birthday

Born in 1743 in Shadwell, Virginia, Jefferson was the third president of the United States and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence. He began his political career in 1769 in the Virginia legislature. Forty years later, he retired as president of the United States. He died on July 4, 1826, at Monticello, his home in Virginia. He once wrote, "All my wishes end where I hope my days will end--at Monticello."

Thomas Jefferson was a dedicated farmer, and his interest in agriculture is evident in much of his writings. His plantation Monticello included vegetable gardens, flower gardens, orchards, vineyards, grain fields, and ornamental landscapes. Jefferson worked on improving plant varieties as well as agricultural tools, such as the plow. To celebrate his birthday, pay a visit to the country home he designed.

To fully grasp his political philosophy, called Jeffersonianism, read his collected works, including "The Fundamentals of Government." It was none other than Abraham Lincoln who said, "The principles of Jefferson are the axioms of a free society."


from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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4/11/13 6:32 A

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During the night on April 22, 2013, people on Earth will have a chance to see one of the rarest meteor shower. During the night you will be able to see thousands of these falling stars until April 23, 2013, these meteors will have the best visibility during the night of April 22, 2013. There is a predicted number of about 20 meteors and hour with possible surges of 100 per hour.

Sandie from SC
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Saturday, April 6, 2013
LOWELL THOMAS DAY

He signed on this day in 1892 with a cry. And then, beginning in 1930 and for fifty more years, he would sign off with, “So long until tomorrow.”

Lowell Thomas, one of America’s most respected newscasters was born in Woodington, Ohio and grew up in Colorado. With degrees from the University of Colorado, New York University, and Columbia University, he became one of the best educated newsmen in the business. And he started in the business at the age of 19 as a reporter for the New York Daily News. Thomas gained notoriety when -- as cameraman Harry Chase filmed -- he reported his eye witness account of author T.E. Lawrence’s 1917 escapades. Lawrence was the British military liaison to the Arabs in their revolt against the Turks. Lowell Thomas’ romantic and adventurous tales of the Brit he referred to as “Lawrence of Arabia,” played to audiences throughout the world, making Lawrence a movie star and Thomas a millionaire.

Lowell Thomas began his long broadcasting career in 1930, as a replacement for NBC’s Floyd Gibbons. His career spanned over five decades and three networks. The first sixteen years were spent at NBC where his broadcasts became so important that the network placed two microphones in front of him-- just in case one failed. Thomas would scoop the other networks and the newspapers wielding a clout and influence never before heard on the airwaves.

After NBC, Thomas moved to CBS, where he stayed for thirty years. His travel adventures made for good news stories and he incorporated them into his nightly news program in a feature called the Tall Tale Club.

Then, in his last years (Thomas died Aug. 29, 1981), he hosted Lowell Thomas Remembers, a series on National Public Radio.
We remember Lowell Thomas as the consummate news broadcaster, and the first to broadcast at one time or another from a ship, an airplane, a submarine and a coal mine.

So long, until tomorrow.

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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4/2/13 7:59 P

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Caroline, thanks for sharing that. I will add it to my list. In 82 my Mom was on kidney dyalysis. See died when she was 60.

Sandie from SC
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I know this is late on this team, but March 14 was World Kidney Day. as I have CKD, please have your self for this disease. Millions have this disease and don't know they have it. this is what happened to me. there are 5 stages of this disease and when I found out I had CKD I was in stage 3, so please be checked, its done in your Blood Work.
Caroline

Im starting to take control of my life today. I will take care of me, love my self., be good to my self, I am strong, i can do this.


 current weight: 20.0  over
 
25
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Tuesday, April 2, 2013
UGLY DUCKLING DAY

Denmark’s most famous author, Hans Christian Andersen, was born on this day in 1805. His life was a true tale of the boy who went from rags to riches. He was born to a poor family; his father, a shoemaker, died when Hans was 11 years old. When he was just 14, Hans left his hometown of Odense, Denmark and traveled to Copenhagen where he, literally, became a starving artist (actor, singer, dancer). It was there that he met the man who became his lifelong friend and benefactor, Jonas Collin. With Collin’s help, Andersen received a royal scholarship and completed his education.
By his 25th birthday, Hans was on his way to a writing career that would make him one of the most widely-read authors in the world. His first recognition came for his many plays and novels. Five years later, he penned his first of 168 fairy tales. Maybe you recognize a few ...

The folk tales: The Tinder-Box, Little Claus and Big Claus; tales that made fun of human faults: The Emperor’s New Suit(also known as The Emperor’s New Clothes), The Princess and the Pea; tales based on his life: The Ugly Duckling, She was Good for Nothing, and others, some philosophical, some with sly humor and some with serious moral messages: The Snow Queen, The Red Shoes,The Little Mermaid, Thumbelina, The Marsh King’s Daughter.

As Andersen’s popularity rose in the 1840s, he found himself rubbing shoulders with kings and queens, famous composers, poets and novelists. He became wealthy enough to visit throughout Europe, writing about his experiences as he traveled. In Sweden is often considered his best travel book. The sensitive writer also wrote his own story in 1855, The Fairy Tale of My Life. Hans Christian Anderson died a lonely man on August 4, 1875, but his stories and fairy tales live on, entertaining children and adults, inspiring new writers.

In fact, the Hans Christian Andersen Award is presented every other year to an author and an illustrator of children’s books. The ‘Little Nobel Prize’, as it is often called, is the highest international recognition bestowed on an author (since 1956) and to an illustrator (since 1966). It is presented by the International Board on Books for Young People (IBBY).

The Ugly Duckling would be proud.



Sandie from SC
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Thursday, March 21, 2013
GOD BLESS AMERICA DAY

God Bless America, written by Irving Berlin back in 1918 as a tribute by a successful immigrant to his adopted country, was recorded by Kate Smith for Victor Records on this day in 1939.
Miss. Smith first introduced the song on her Thursday, November 10, 1938 radio show (aired live the day before Armistice Day). God Bless America was a fitting tribute to its composer, who gave all royalties from the very popular and emotional song to the Boy Scouts. The song became Kate Smith’s second signature after When the Moon Comes Over the Mountain; and the second national anthem of the United States of America.

I remember well as a young child sitting in front of the black and white TV, watching the Kate Smith Show. I loved listening to her. My three favorite programs at that time wee: The Kate Smith Show, Howdy Doody, and The Lone Ranger.


Sandie from SC
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Wednesday, March 20, 2013
UNCLE TOM’S CABIN DAY

It was on this day in 1852 that Harriet Beecher Stowe’s classic book was published. Uncle Tom’s Cabin, subtitled Life Among the Lowly became an instant success, selling 300,000 copies in its first year. It has since been translated into twenty languages and performed as a play the world over.
Uncle Tom’s Cabin was even spotlighted in the Broadway musical and film, The King and I. Maybe you remember the haunting chant from the show, “Run Eliza, Run!” Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel remains a must-read for school children -- and a reminder to all of us of an ugly time in the history of the United States.

The antislavery novel and the adapted plays all feature the elderly, kind slave, Uncle Tom; the slave child, Topsy; Little Eva, the daughter of Tom’s owner; Eliza, a young mulatto woman and the cruel, northern-born overseer who beat Tom to death, Simon LeGree.

The book brought much sympathy from around the world toward the American“peculiar institution” of slavery. In fact, Abraham Lincoln told Harriet Beecher Stowe she was “the little woman who wrote the book that started this great war,” referring of course, to the Civil War.

’Til this day, we refer to an employer or any other with slave-driving tendencies as a ‘Simon LeGree’.

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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March 16, 1802

U.S. Military Academy established emoticon

The United States Military Academy--the first military school in the United States--was founded by Congress for the purpose of educating and training young men in the theory and practice of military science. Located at West Point, New York, the U.S. Military Academy is often simply known as West Point.

Located on the high west bank of New York's Hudson River, West Point was the site of a Revolutionary-era fort built to protect the Hudson River Valley from British attack. In 1780, Patriot General Benedict Arnold, the commander of the fort, agreed to surrender West Point to the British in exchange for 6,000 pounds. However, the plot was uncovered before it fell into British hands, and Arnold fled to the British for protection.

Ten years after the establishment of the U.S. Military Academy in 1802, the growing threat of another war with Great Britain resulted in congressional action to expand the academy's facilities and increase the West Point corps. Beginning in 1817, the U.S. Military Academy was reorganized by superintendent Sylvanus Thayer--later known as the "father of West Point"--and the school became one of the nation's finest sources of civil engineers. During the Mexican-American War, West Point graduates filled the leading ranks of the victorious U.S. forces, and with the outbreak of the Civil War former West Point classmates regretfully lined up against one another in the defense of their native states.

In 1870, the first African-American cadet was admitted into the U.S. Military Academy, and in 1976, the first female cadets. The academy is now under the general direction and supervision of the department of the U.S. Army and has an enrollment of more than 4,000 students.

from: This Day in History


Sandie from SC
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3/13/13 6:20 A

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Mar 13, 1942:
U.S. Army launches K-9 Corps

On this day in 1942, the Quartermaster Corps (QMC) of the United States Army begins training dogs for the newly established War Dog Program, or "K-9 Corps."

Well over a million dogs served on both sides during World War I, carrying messages along the complex network of trenches and providing some measure of psychological comfort to the soldiers. The most famous dog to emerge from the war was Rin Tin Tin, an abandoned puppy of German war dogs found in France in 1918 and taken to the United States, where he made his film debut in the 1922 silent film The Man from Hell's River. As the first bona fide animal movie star, Rin Tin Tin made the little-known German Shepherd breed famous across the country.

In the United States, the practice of training dogs for military purposes was largely abandoned after World War I. When the country entered World War II in December 1941, the American Kennel Association and a group called Dogs for Defense began a movement to mobilize dog owners to donate healthy and capable animals to the Quartermaster Corps of the U.S. Army. Training began in March 1942, and that fall the QMC was given the task of training dogs for the U.S. Navy, Marines and Coast Guard as well.

The K-9 Corps initially accepted over 30 breeds of dogs, but the list was soon narrowed to seven: German Shepherds, Belgian sheep dogs, Doberman Pinschers, collies, Siberian Huskies, Malumutes and Eskimo dogs. Members of the K-9 Corps were trained for a total of 8 to 12 weeks. After basic obedience training, they were sent through one of four specialized programs to prepare them for work as sentry dogs, scout or patrol dogs, messenger dogs or mine-detection dogs. In active combat duty, scout dogs proved especially essential by alerting patrols to the approach of the enemy and preventing surprise attacks.

The top canine hero of World War II was Chips, a German Shepherd who served with the Army's 3rd Infantry Division. Trained as a sentry dog, Chips broke away from his handlers and attacked an enemy machine gun nest in Italy, forcing the entire crew to surrender. The wounded Chips was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross, Silver Star and the Purple Heart--all of which were later revoked due to an Army policy preventing official commendation of animals.

from: This Day in History

Sandie from SC
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3/12/13 5:27 A

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Tuesday, March 12, 2013
GIRL SCOUTS DAY

The Girl Scouts of the USA was founded on this day in 1912. Juliette Gordon Low of Savannah, Georgia is the person credited with starting this group for young girls, figuring, of course, that if there were Boy Scouts, why not Girl Scouts, too?

However, at first, the girls weren’t called Girl Scouts at all. They were called Girl Guides until the name was officially changed a short time after the group’s founding. Volunteer, help a friend, set an example and complete a project, then pass those chocolate mint and peanut butter-filled cookies.

from: Those Were the Days.


Sandie from SC
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3/7/13 3:24 A

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Thursday, March 7, 2013
MONOPOLY DAY

It was on this day in 1933 that Charles Darrow created the game we know as Monopoly. Or was it?

Maybe Lizzie J. Magie’s The Landlord’s Game, patented on January 5, 1904, was the real monopoly game. Or was it? Lizzie's game was very similar to Monopoly, except she, a Quaker from Virginia, created it as a political comment to promote a single land-ownership tax. She shared it with other Quakers and proponents of the tax measure. Families copied the game, adding their own favorite street names and changing the rules as they pleased. The name of the game changed as the rules changed.

A Reading, Pennsylvania college student, Dan Layman, played the version his friends called Monopoly in the late 1920s. Once out of college, and back home in Indianapolis, he produced the game under the name,Finance. His dorm-mate, Louis Thun, copyrighted several rules that the two had written. Was Layman’s the real Monopoly game?

Or was it Ruth Hoskins and friends, Quakers who lived in Atlantic City, who made the Monopoly game we still play? Ruth learned how to play the game from a friend of Layman’s in Indianapolis. She then moved to Atlantic City and shared it with other friends. In 1930, they made a version complete with Atlantic City street names like Boardwalk, Park Place, Virginia and Pennsylvania Avenues; even including Marven Gardens, a residential section at the edge of Margate City, a suburb of Atlantic City.

Charles Darrow, an inventor of sorts, first saw and played the game in 1931, when he and his wife were introduced to Monopoly by mutual friends of Ruth Hoskins. The Darrows, who lived in Germantown, Pennsylvania, were penniless. The Depression had left them destitute. Fascinated with the game, Darrow made some modifications, misspelled Marven Gardens as Marvin Gardens, added copyrighted artwork and produced games which he then began to sell on this day in 1933.

The popularity of the game was instant. Darrow could not keep up with the demand. He eventually sold his ‘rights’ to Parker Brothers who initially turned Darrow away, saying that his game had “52 fundamental errors.” The 50-year-old company eventually agreed to give Darrow royalties on everyMonopoly game sold, on the condition that they could write “short version” game rules. Ultimately, Darrow became a millionaire at age 46.

So, who made the unwritten rule that the next player to land on Free Parking gets the money, if any, collected from Chance andCommunity Chest fees? We don't have the answer to that or who the real Monopoly creator was ... but we wonder if whoever it was ownedBoardwalk? And, did they pass GO and collect $200?

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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3/5/13 5:20 A

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Hula-Hoop patented

On this day in 1963, the Hula-Hoop, a hip-swiveling toy that became a huge fad across America when it was first marketed by Wham-O in 1958, is patented by the company's co-founder, Arthur "Spud" Melin. An estimated 25 million Hula-Hoops were sold in its first four months of production alone.

In 1948, friends Arthur Melin and Richard Knerr founded a company in California to sell a slingshot they created to shoot meat up to falcons they used for hunting. The company’s name, Wham-O, came from the sound the slingshots supposedly made. Wham-O eventually branched out from slingshots, selling boomerangs and other sporting goods. Its first hit toy, a flying plastic disc known as the Frisbee, debuted in 1957. The Frisbee was originally marketed under a different name, the Pluto Platter, in an effort to capitalize on America's fascination with UFOs.

Melina and Knerr were inspired to develop the Hula-Hoop after they saw a wooden hoop that Australian children twirled around their waists during gym class. Wham-O began producing a plastic version of the hoop, dubbed "Hula" after the hip-gyrating Hawaiian dance of the same name, and demonstrating it on Southern California playgrounds. Hula-Hoop mania took off from there.

The enormous popularity of the Hula-Hoop was short-lived and within a matter of months, the masses were on to the next big thing. However, the Hula-Hoop never faded away completely and still has its fans today. According to Ripley's Believe It or Not, in April 2004, a performer at the Big Apple Circus in Boston simultaneously spun 100 hoops around her body. Earlier that same year, in January, according to the Guinness World Records, two people in Tokyo, Japan, managed to spin the world's largest hoop--at 13 feet, 4 inches--around their waists at least three times each.

Following the Hula-Hoop, Wham-O continued to produce a steady stream of wacky and beloved novelty items, including the Superball, Water Wiggle, Silly String, Slip 'n' Slide and the Hacky Sack.


Sandie from SC
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3/3/13 6:05 A

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Sunday, March 3, 2013
TIME DAY

On this day in 1923 the first issue of the weekly periodical TIME appeared on newsstands. The first issue was 32 pages and featured a charcoal sketch of House Speaker Joseph Gurney ‘Uncle Joe’ Cannon on the cover. It was the United States’ first modern news magazine (circulation of 3,700).

The worldwide news weekly, founded by Henry Luce and Briton Hadden, is printed in several languages and is among the most popular magazines in history (readership of 3.3 million). The magazine, published by Time Warner, has a corporate staff housed in its own building: the Time and Life Building in New York City.


from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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3/2/13 5:11 A

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On this date in 1836 Texas declared its independence.

Sandie from SC
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3/1/13 6:24 A

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Welcome to March and welcome to March Madness!

March Madness - The expression, "March Madness," was first used in 1939 by Henry V. Porter, a high school basketball coach in Illinois. The term was used to describe the excitement about the Illinois state tournament for boy's basketball.

Today, the term is used by sports promoters and fans, especially for basketball. Commercials and promotions that advertise sales for retail merchants also frequently use the term, "March Madness."


Sandie from SC
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2/26/13 5:14 A

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013
GRAND CANYON DAY

The Grand Canyon was established as a National Park on this day in 1919 by an act of the U.S. Congress. The gigantic gorge that cuts through the high plateaus of the northwest corner of Arizona was formed by thousands of years of erosion. The raging Colorado River was the culprit.

Called one of the most spectacular natural wonders of the world, the Grand Canyon National Park covered 1,218,375 acres ... and still does. It measures 18 miles across, over two hundred miles long, and is a mile from its rim to the Colorado River below.

The Grand Canyon, home to American Indian tribes for many hundreds of years, was first discovered by European explorers on the Coronado expedition of 1540. An inspiration for artists, musical compositions, amusement park attractions, novels and more, it remains one of nature’s most magnificent displays, attracting over two million sightseers a year.

From the Grand Canyon Web site run by the National Park Service: The Grand Canyon we visit today is a gift from past generations. Take time to enjoy this gift. Sit and watch the changing play of light and shadows. Wander along a trail and feel the sunshine and wind on your face. Attend a ranger program. Follow the antics of ravens soaring above the rim. Listen for the roar of the rapids far below. Savor a sunrise or sunset. As the shadows lengthen across the spires and buttes, time passing into the depths of the canyon, understand what this great chasm passes to us - a sense of humility born in the interconnections of all that is and a willingness to care for this land. We have the responsibility to ensure that future generations have the opportunity to form their own connections with Grand Canyon National Park

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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2/24/13 9:42 A

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Sunday, February 24, 2013
VOICE OF AMERICA DAY

It was an historic day in radio broadcasting, as the Voice of America (VOA) signed on for the first time on this day in 1942. The worldwide, shortwave radio service, a department of the United States Government, continues to beam a variety of programming around the globe under the auspices of the United States Information Agency (USIA).

The VOA transmits from modern studios in Washington, DC and beams much of its programming via satellite to transmitters worldwide. In addition, the VOA maintains huge transmitters in the U.S. and around the world in order to provide distinctly American information, culture and entertainment, in dozens of languages, to every corner of the globe. For years, the tune, Yankee Doodle, has opened each sign-on broadcast.

More than 40 years after the VOA was launched, the USIA started Radio Marti, an immensely powerful radio transmitter tethered from a huge blimp in the Florida Keys. The controversial station broadcast to Cuba, irritating Cuban Premier Fidel Castro enough for him to jam the signals of U.S. broadcasters. The Radio Marti blimp crashed after deflating while airborne a number of years ago. The station returned to the air and has been joined by TV Marti as well.

Sandie from SC
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2/23/13 3:58 A

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Saturday, February 23, 2013
STARS, STRIPES & MARINES DAY

It was February 23, 1945 and four days of bitter battle had taken its toll on the 28th Regiment of the Fifth Marine Division of the U.S. Marines. Their task had been to neutralize the defenses and scale the heavily fortified Mount Surabachi. The volcanic peak, at the southern tip of the Japanese island of Iwo Jima, was one of the first objectives of the Marines’ invasion of this small, strategic island, 750 miles south of Tokyo.

Although losses were heavy, the Marine platoon succeeded in its mission and reached the top of Mount Surabachi on this day. Victory was triumphant -- as the famous photograph (by Joe Rosenthal) of these Marines raising the American flag portrayed.

The photograph inspired the Marine Corps Memorial, Iwo Jima Statue which now stands near Arlington National Cemetery, the largest cast bronze statue in the world. This monument is dedicated to all U.S. Marines (since 1775) who have given their lives for their country.

As the flag was being raised, Navy Secretary James Forrestal was standing on the beachhead below. When he saw Old Glory waving in the breeze, he told Lt. General Holland M. Smith, “The raising of that flag on Surabachi means a Marine Corps for the next 500 years.”

Sandie from SC
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2/22/13 7:10 A

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George Washington's Birthday

George Washington, the Father of Our Country

Born: February 22, 1732
Died: December 14, 1799

The first president of the United States, George Washington, is often referred to as the Father of Our Country. He was known for his love of the land and farming, and his dislike of war. He was a distinguished general and commander in chief of the colonial armies in the American Revolution. He married a widow, Martha Dandridge Custis, and they lived at Mount Vernon, Washington's plantation in Virginia on the Potomac River emoticon


Sandie from SC
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2/21/13 6:44 A

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Thursday, February 21, 2013
WASHINGTON MONUMENT DAY

On this day in 1885, the official dedication of the Washington Monument took place in Washington, D.C., although the monument did not open for another three years. In fact, the structure took a total of thirty-six years to finish. Construction took place in two major phases, 1848-1856, and 1876-1884. The Civil War and a lack of funds caused the big delay.
The stone obelisk honoring the first President of the United States was designed by Robert Mills who died in this, the year of the dedication.

A major visitor attraction, one can see the entire city of Washington D.C., plus parts of the surrounding states of Virginia and Maryland from the top of the 555-foot monument. If you visit the city when the cherry trees are in blossom, you will be treated to a spectacular view from ground level too, as images of the blossoms and monument shimmer in the rectangular pool facing the Washington Monument. Now, that’s something to reflect on...

From: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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2/20/13 6:36 A

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Wednesday, February 20, 2013
FATHER OF LITTLE LEAGUE DAY

Millions of kids throughout the world have spent their summer days playing baseball thanks to a man named Carl E. Stotz. Stotz was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania on this day in 1910. Twenty-nine years later, Carl Stotz found a way for little boys to play at the man’s game of baseball. He founded the Little League Baseball Organization, which consisted of three teams. (Today, each local league may have from four to ten teams.)

Boys, ages 8 to 12, formed the baseball teams that played on a diamond two-thirds the size of a regulation diamond; and played for six innings. Wearing rubber cleats and using bats no longer than 33 inches, boys were able to participate in America’s favorite pastime. Girls have been included in Little League since 1974 and championship tournaments are played at the end of the regular season of at least 15 games. The tournaments are held to select eight regional winners from around the world.

In honor of Carl Stotz, each August, the regional winners from the U.S. compete in the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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2/18/13 8:38 A

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On this day (2/18) in 1885, Mark Twain publishes his famous--and famously controversial--novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Twain (the pen name of Samuel Clemens) first introduced Huck Finn as the best friend of Tom Sawyer, hero of his tremendously successful novel The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876). Though Twain saw Huck's story as a kind of sequel to his earlier book, the new novel was far more serious, focusing on the institution of slavery and other aspects of life in the antebellum South.


Sandie from SC
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2/17/13 6:10 A

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Sunday, February 17, 2013
PTA DAY

The National Congress of Mothers was organized on this day in 1897 in Washington, DC by Alice McLellan Birney, shown here in the photo at left, and Phoebe Apperson Hearst.

At first, the objectives of the organization were devoted to child study. The National Congress urged parents to study the school curriculums that were being used in the schools their children attended. The Congress also suggested that parents, both mothers and fathers, should take reading courses that provided information about children and schooling.

The group later changed its name to the National Congress of Parents and Teachers or the NPTA with local groups known as the PTA (Parent-Teacher Associations). The first State Congress of the NPTA was organized in New York in 1897. And one of the first major projects the PTA worked on was the extension of kindergartens to the elementary school grades.
In recent years many local PTA groups emphasized greater involvement of students and are known as Parent-Teacher-Student Associations or PTSA.

PTA or PTSA meetings are commonly held monthly at public schools throughout the U.S. If you’re a member, remember that you’re supposed to be promoting the educational, emotional and social welfare of our children.

from: Those Were the Days

Sandie from SC
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2/15/13 9:49 A

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United States - The Eisenhower interstate system requires that one mile in every five must be straight. These straight sections are usable as airstrips in times of war or other emergencies.



Sandie from SC
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2/14/13 7:48 A

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Russia - The deepest hole ever drilled by man is the Kola Superdeep Borehole, in Russia .It reached a depth of 12,261 meters (about 40,226 feet or 7.62 miles). It was drilled for scientific research and gave up some unexpected discoveries, one of which was a huge deposit of hydrogen - so massive that the mud coming from the hole was boiling with it.

Sandie from SC
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2/13/13 6:15 A

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Roads - Chances that a road is unpaved:
in the U.S.A. . = 1%;
in Canada = ...75%


Sandie from SC
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2/13/13 6:15 A

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St. Paul , Minnesota - St. Paul , Minnesota was originally called Pig's Eye after a man named Pierre 'Pig's Eye' Parrant who set up the first business there.



Sandie from SC
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