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MARGIE100%PURE's Photo MARGIE100%PURE Posts: 1,513
1/9/11 5:10 P

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My mother was raised in a kitchen of her hospital cook mother. When fresh greens came in the deepest sink was washed then filled with cool water and a few tablespoons if salt was added. Then using a tear instead of a metal knife to cut and trim; the stems were torn off from the sweet green leaves under running water. This next part is interesting; when the cleaned pile of green leafy vegetables were ready to put into storage; she would dampen a kitchen towel and wring off excess drips and wrap the ready to cook or use fresh foods like a baby in a receiving blanket. When the mood hit her; she would add a rubber band to close the ends. I practice this and bleach the green color back off in the next wash. A clean towel and the green stains are so worth the longer usable green life as it sat in the fridge between uses. I tried the ‘green bags’ and like the longer time that care of perishable goods expect to get my money’s worth in value.
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The greatest love story is your own.
If you miss out of life to the fullest; they win.
You are the happiness master of your own mind.
Thought is an active dynamic energy to harmonize and corrolate good.
Clear all paths to love thru forgiveness.
I may not recognize the significance until some time later.
Is my resistance to change really that strong?
Impatience does not provide the time to learn the lesson;
Awaken new ways to approach the dissolving of a problem;
OAKRUN Posts: 26
1/9/11 1:58 P

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Like everyone else I'm trying to reduce my grocery bills. Since I eat Paleo, that cuts out quite a bit of cost simply because it excludes grains and dairy.

There are huge numbers of GF recipes online, including those at glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/ and
www.glutenfreeda.com/ .

For really cutting down grocery costs, the new book called "Cut Your Grocery Bill in Half with America's Cheapest Family" by Steve Economides is really excellent and doesn't rely on coupons. More help is available at their web site. Plus libraries and yard sales are terrific resources!

And don't forget to ask family members for old cookbooks. Cookbooks dating back to before 1960 used real foods, and there are many recipes in old cookbooks that are gluten-free. (example: the old Joy of Cooking is wonderful, but not the newer versions that rely more on convenience foods)

Aren't used to shopping for fresh produce? Ask among your senior family members, or senior friends - especially those who are good cooks - and go with them to the store. You'll learn a lot about selecting produce and bargain hunting!

Since I live a long ways from the store, I'm trying another tactic. I buy as much fresh foods as will keep well for most of the week and then shift to using frozen veggies the last few days before going back into town. Also, I'm trying to make better use of the crockpot recipes for salvaging those fresh veggies that might not get used before they lose their vitamins. It's important to cut down on what fresh-gone-bad food gets trashed. Be sure to check the refrigerator weekly for items that need to be tossed, and then consider buying those items frozen next time to avoid waste. (For me it's cauliflower - I should only buy that frozen!)

And the grocery list is vital! As you use things while cooking write down anything that's going to need to be replaced. Also check the pantry and freezer before heading out to shop so you don't get home and find a vital ingredient missing. Since it costs me $10/trip to go to town, I don't want to get home without everything I need for the next week.

To really save money you'll have to decide between the fast convenience foods and your time in the kitchen. Make your own convenience meals when you cook a large meal freeze a portion first and create your own convenience frozen foods. Cut back as much as you can on pre-packaged, processed foods.

Yes I do buy some canned items to have as 'back up', but not in the amounts that I once did. Remember, I really don't like to cook, so cooking from scratch is work to me. But, to really cut food expenses, cooking from scratch is actually cheaper than buying prepared foods though you might not realize this fact early in making the shift. It seems like buying canned X already cooked is cheaper, but when I got going on cooking from scratch I'm finding it to be significantly less expensive (and healthier) to use real food - but only if I cease buying convenience foods.

Finally, make your own snacks and desserts. These items can be both healthier and less expensive than their processed food counterparts. Occasionally picking up some GFCF cookies is fine. But sliced apples, diced, then sprinkled with lemon juice, cinnamon, crushed walnuts, and a few raisins cooked a few minutes in the microwave makes a fast, healthy dessert, too. Frozen grapes are very tasty as well.

Make your own salad dressings. How hard is it to combine olive oil, red wine vinegar and some seasonings in a small jar and shake it? It's much less expensive to make your own. If you do buy commercial salad dressing, try adding some water. Often you can add water up to to a third or more of the container which would make that item less costly, plus it pours better out of the container.

Those are my favorite tips emoticon

HEALTHYBARB1's Photo HEALTHYBARB1 SparkPoints: (114,974)
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1/8/11 10:22 A

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Bailey- Thanks for the Gluten free homemaker link. Information and recipes were helpful. Smiles Barb emoticon

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"If you want something you've never had...you must do something you've never done!"

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MARGIE100%PURE's Photo MARGIE100%PURE Posts: 1,513
1/7/11 6:56 P

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If you file long form of 1040 federal taxes look into the deductions for buying gluten-free foods. This informs the gov of special health needs and helps them see the volume and size of the population of gluten-free eaters; you are not alone and take a deduction in the tally for yourself! emoticon emoticon

The greatest love story is your own.
If you miss out of life to the fullest; they win.
You are the happiness master of your own mind.
Thought is an active dynamic energy to harmonize and corrolate good.
Clear all paths to love thru forgiveness.
I may not recognize the significance until some time later.
Is my resistance to change really that strong?
Impatience does not provide the time to learn the lesson;
Awaken new ways to approach the dissolving of a problem;
BAILEYS7OF9's Photo BAILEYS7OF9 SparkPoints: (120,890)
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1/7/11 4:35 P

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www.glutenfreehomemaker.com/2010/03/
gl
uten-free-frugality.html

This just hit my email box. Gluten-Free Frugality

good timing huh?





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DEBBIERNDDHC's Photo DEBBIERNDDHC Posts: 461
1/7/11 10:03 A

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These are some great tips! I am compiling a list of these things, to offer to my patients who are newly diagnosed, or who aren't newly diagnosed but made a decision to not go to gf and now that they have support, may be ready to try it again. It is my hope that by making my own status public, i can help others. Like you guys have helped me! I have alot of members who aren't online at all and I need some things to help them as well. Plus, i am trying to start a support group in my area and maybe we can start a purchasing co-op to save on shipping etc.

CINDYTW Posts: 5,783
1/6/11 9:26 P

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Kate there isn't a problem with most items they are in dispensers that pour out and I haven't reacted to anything yet. Some are in bins but usually they are good about separating things like that. You also reminded me another resource for things like Mesa Sunrise and other dry/canned goods...Big Lots or Odd Lots! I have gotten some great deals there!

Edited by: CINDYTW at: 1/6/2011 (21:28)
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TELLITFORWARD SparkPoints: (10,826)
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1/6/11 2:01 P

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I use Costco for the things they have. When they had the Mesa Sunrise cereal in 31 ounce boxes for $7.69, I bought a bunch of them, and keep them in the cold room of our garage. It won't be cold in summer, but for now they are fine, and I'm enjoying cereal a number of times per week. I bought GF oat groats on sale and ground them. I use them a lot in baking and for good oatmeal.
Costco has had the Crunchmaster whole grain GF crackers, and I use them a lot instead of bread. I can't drive, so I'm limited in the number of trips I make. I buy a lot of things at a time when I do go. Trader Joe's has good prices on brown rice pasta, and some of their brands of soups, which I use when I'm in a hurry.
Bulk foods can be a problem, depending on how close they are to the gluten items. If the brown rice flour is right next to whole wheat flour, and the same ladle is used, it can be problematic. I'm worried about things like that. Also, if you buy quinoa in bulk, it likely will need to be rinsed before you use it.
Costco also has a big bag of prerinsed quinoa, which I buy two at a time.
Kate

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CINDYTW Posts: 5,783
1/6/11 1:24 P

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Surprisingly my health food store and local natural foods co-ops have great bulk sections that actually are cheaper than the supermarket ones. I buy a lot of things like nuts, beans, rice, quinoa, flours, and even GF pasta there. They even have bulk nut butters, coffees and teas.

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HEALTHYBARB1's Photo HEALTHYBARB1 SparkPoints: (114,974)
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1/6/11 12:32 P

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Hi! Budgeting and eating Gluten free has been a challenge for me as well. Things I have done to help are: 1.Order cookbooks online from my local library and use them for free to get new recipes. 2. Converted the current meals we loved to eat to gluten free. 4.Made my own cookbook and collect recipes that sound good and fit in my budget. 4. Visited different stores in our area and found the best places to buy things and then watched for sales and bought in bulk. 5. Visited a big box asian food store and found that they had better prices on many gluten free foods. 6. Try to eat more whole foods that are naturally gluten free. 7. Stores we have that have been helpful are Whole Foods, Fred Meyer, Uwajimaya, Safeway and Nature's Market and we have a local gluten free bakery as well. 8. I also buy some items in bulk from Costco. 9.I try to limit the number of stores and try to sale shop and buy a larger quantity at at time when possible and it seems to be getting easier. Keeping a balance between cost and time and having what we need takes some planning but I don't like to spend my life shopping for food. 10.I have also made a menu list of all the meals we like to eat and what I need to buy that is gluten free for them and try to be organized at staying a couple of weeks ahead with supplies. This makes life easier. 11.I also make things like homemade gluten free meatballs, gluten free rolls and bread, granola and cookies in batches and then freeze them or store them in pantry so that I can take out a just what I need and have one baking time or one making meatballs time and have a supply to last a month or so. Batch cooking and preparation seems to save me both time and money. 12.I also have a bin with premixed flour blend for the majority of my baking and mix my own flour. My favorite cookbook is 1000 gluten free recipes by Carol Fenster and I love her sorghum flour blend. It is higher in fiber and protein then most other blends and works well in most of my cooking. I also try to make as much as possible at home and not buy the costly premade gluten free stuff at the store...it take a little more time but has saved us.
I have also tried to convert as much of our cooking to be family friendly for all and though I still buy different bread for my family, cereals and some snack items we are mostly gluten free in the main meals that we eat together. Hope these ideas are helpful. Best wishes for staying on budget and gluten free and healthier in 2011. Smiles Barb

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"If you want something you've never had...you must do something you've never done!"

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BAILEYS7OF9's Photo BAILEYS7OF9 SparkPoints: (120,890)
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1/6/11 12:11 P

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I buy naturally GF foods mostly. I have purchased the flours to use for when needing them for a dish, but am not baking items just to have them.

I used to have bread 4-5 times a week as I would bring a sandwich for lunch to work. Now I only have my GF bread once or twice a week. I found I don't really miss it that much. I eat more salads now for lunch.

I do not cook that much pasta anymore. But a shopping trip down an ethnic aisle in the grocery store can show you many naturally GF rice noodles by the Asian area. These are NOT marked GF but it's a no brainer that they are. Go to the GF section and they will be there but much higher because it states GF.

I have one store that always has a shopping cart of reduced items. I have tried a lot of GF items there. Seems they don't sell as fast as the store hopes (pricey) so the price is knocked down 45% or so. I have gotten a bunch of bread mixes and cookies this way. Try not to buy the cookies though...

Edited by: BAILEYS7OF9 at: 1/6/2011 (12:13)




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EERYE701 Posts: 7
1/6/11 12:08 P

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That is a good point about the store that puts their GF items on sale. My Harris Teeter has the Vans gf chicken nuggets on sale right now. Still way more than i want to spend, but you are totally right as far as that goes.

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1/6/11 11:52 A

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Since I have diabetes and can't eat dairy or soy as well and eat only low glycemic foods (which eliminate things like rice and potatoes) cost has been a real factor for me. Here are some of my tips.

1. Buy some of your veggies and flours at Ethnic markets like Asian and Indian.

2. Buy only "in season" fruits and veggies.

3. When you do buy flours buy large amounts if you know you like them already. Store them in the freezer.

4. Make as many things from scratch as possible. Premade GF foods tend to be very expensive. I have to make most things from scratch because everything is made from rice flour. I even make my own crackers. I don't make small amounts though. I make big batches and put those in the freezer as well.

5. I buy from a grocery store that will put GF foods on sale.



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EERYE701 Posts: 7
1/6/11 10:57 A

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I will state again, that this is DebbieRNDDHC under my new persona. I am going to have to add anyone here who is my pal, to my friends again. Anyway, i am carefully proceeding forward with my life, trying to find new ways to live, new ways to transition from fluten to the new way of eating. I have found this cost to be prohibitive. Esp with gas prices on the rise. So, i am listing a few of my survivor techniques to keep from going broke. I would really appreciate some of yours too!
1. meat potato and rice and veggies are GF and so is yogurt and cheese. no issue with dairy thus far, so i am trying to make these items the star of my menu's
2. each weekend i am trying two recipes to see if i can find some favs to put in baggies, premeasured. I own a ton of flours and need to use them sooner than later. since premixed packages are so costly.
3. By buying GF oatmeal and some fruits like raisins for mix ins, i am bringing my breakfast and having soups and a string cheese for lunch. these are simple to do, to plan and to store.
4. looking into the possibility of creating a celiac group here in town, with the hope of creating a buyers co-op to save on shipping etc.
What are your tips!

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