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RODENTMAMA's Photo RODENTMAMA Posts: 697
11/13/10 8:28 P

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I made the almond cheese crackers from the Almond Flour Cookbook and really didn't like the texture at all. I didn't manage to roll them thin enough so they weren't as crisp as I wanted. However, I blenderized them to crumbs and they are excellent as crumbs in meatloaves and veggie burger. I'm thinking ground almonds, shredded cheddar or parmesan with an egg might make a nice pat in crumb shell for any kind of quiche. (Saving the actual baking of crackers to pulverize.) You could add whatever spices you like and vary the cheese going to something milder like mozza or mortadella so it wouldn't overpower your filling. With salmon I think dill in the crust might be quite nice.

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CINDYTW Posts: 5,783
11/3/10 9:13 P

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It is from kraftfoods.com and is called "pumpkin swirl cheesecake". Tried to forward myself a link and didn't work. I made it several years in a row and was very happy with it even though I was not GF at the time.

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45ANDFIT1's Photo 45ANDFIT1 Posts: 1,003
11/2/10 4:33 A

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Oooh - the gingersnap crust sounds great. I love MiDel Ginger Snaps!

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CINDYTW Posts: 5,783
11/1/10 9:15 P

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I just remembered I used to make my Mom a GF pumpkin cheesecake every Thanksgiving using MiDel ginger snaps, butter, and I think almonds to make the crust...I think the recipe was from Kraft.com and I just used the GF version of the ginger snaps. i know what I am having this year! emoticon

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11/1/10 11:32 A

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mushroom sounds yummy, I'll try it/

JENCORINNE's Photo JENCORINNE Posts: 1,933
10/31/10 9:38 A

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I wish I could say I invented that crust but my Mom had the recipe, but for gluten crackers. All I did was sub GF crackers. Everytime I make it I try a different cracker, so far Crunchmaster is my favorite.

45andFit1 - I don't see why you couldn't try zucchini, just remember the veggie is all your liquid so if its dry might need to add some liquids.

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45ANDFIT1's Photo 45ANDFIT1 Posts: 1,003
10/31/10 6:16 A

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The mushroom crust sounds yummy - I wonder if something like shredded zucchini could be added to cut the "mushroomy-ness"... my DH is not a huge mushroom fan.

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ZUCCHINIQUEEN's Photo ZUCCHINIQUEEN Posts: 7,558
10/31/10 5:51 A

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Wow! That mushroom crust blows my mind. Did you figure that out by yourself? The creativity of GF people astounds me!

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JENCORINNE's Photo JENCORINNE Posts: 1,933
10/28/10 4:37 P

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another easy GF Quiche crust is a package of sliced mushrooms(or buy equivalent amount of whole mushrooms and slice them yourself). Saute them, then throw in the blender or food processor with GF crackers(usually for me about a box) and blend them all together. When blended pour into pan and press into shape.

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10/28/10 3:27 P

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What about making the quiche without a crust? I do often. Also, shredded potatoes and butter or marg. make a good crust for quiche. I do a very easy low carb quiche. I vary it with bacon or ham and spinach or brocolli.

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10/28/10 9:35 A

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I've used GF oats and almond meal and a bit of trown rice flour to make a cheesecake crust. Even my scoffer admitted it was "not too bad for GF."
Yes, I shop online all the time. Most of the time I just make crustless things, using a bit of brown rice flour or spelt, (which I can eat in moderation) so the result isn't too watery. I've never really liked pie crust, even as a child.
Kate

"It is only with the heart that one sees rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
Antoine de Saint Exupery: The Little Prince


"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world."
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10/28/10 1:13 A

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Kate, I have made the recipe from Shauna's blog (Gluten-free girl) and it was VERY good. Just remember that it's definitely not going to feel or act like a gluten pie crust. My pie crust turned out pretty crumbly, but I turned it in to blackberry tarts with strawberry curd and everyone (even the non-GF guys) loved it.

Sweet rice flour, also called Mochiko, can be found at Asian grocery stores, but I've also found it at Safeway! If you don't like cornstarch, you can try potato starch (which I have found is a little denser than rice or corn flours). Are you able to shop online? Bob's Red Mill is a great place to order GF flours.

Good luck!!

~Bethany

Habit is habit and not to be flung out of the window by any man [or woman], but coaxed downstairs a step at a time.--Samuel Clemens

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Leader--Celiac Disease and Gluten-Free

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"As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter words, but to live by them." - John F. Kennedy


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DJ4HEALTH's Photo DJ4HEALTH Posts: 41,611
10/27/10 11:07 P

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Sweet rice flour is most of the time found in the Chinese section of the store. That is where I find mine.

Dorothy

If you tell God no because He won't explain the reason He wants you to do something, you are actually hindering His blessing. But when you say yes to Him, all of heaven opens to pour out His goodness and reward your obedience. What matters more than material blessings are the things He is teaching us in our spirit.
Charles Stanley


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JENCORINNE's Photo JENCORINNE Posts: 1,933
6/19/10 12:32 P

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Guar and Xanthum do slightly different things in baking. One's more for chewy things the other not and I get them backwards. Some people react to one but not the other. Xanthum comes from a mold and is man made Vs guar which comes from a plant.

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6/19/10 2:00 A

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Thanks for the info. If guar is so much less expensive, how come it isn't used much? Just wondering.
I relally appreciate the recipes. I'm do a trip to Whole Foods, so maybe I can get some. I do not like the taste of cornstarch.
Kate

"It is only with the heart that one sees rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
Antoine de Saint Exupery: The Little Prince


"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world."
Heather Cortez
JENCORINNE's Photo JENCORINNE Posts: 1,933
6/19/10 1:52 A

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If I remember sweet rice is just a longer grain and grinds into a finer flour. in a pinch maybe mix rice flour and cornstarch - maybe, thats what I'm thinking.

If you can't find xanthum gum you can use guar gum - and its a fraction of the taste.

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6/19/10 1:44 A

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Thanks for the recipes. I haven't found sweet rice flour yet, and hope I can find the xantham gum.
I really need to get busy labeling all my flours so I can tell them apart. I'd love to get the book, but it's not recorded, so I'm again at the mercy of the internet.
I wish I could just go out and buy a book at a bookstore like everyone else, but until I can afford the $2000 for a portable scanner, then I won't be able to do that. I'm not complaining, just explaining why I don't have a library.
The only books available recorded are Hagman's Gluten Free Gourmet cooks Comfort Foods, Malorca's The Wheat Free Cook and The Gluten Free Bible.
I'll hope to ask a friend who is going to Whole Foods if she can find some sweet rice flour. Oh, if only there can someday be a navigable care using just GPS, I'll be one of the first blind drivers. Till then, I'll have to be content to have driven a boat in the Atlantic.
And... I LOVED it!!!
Kate

"It is only with the heart that one sees rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
Antoine de Saint Exupery: The Little Prince


"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world."
Heather Cortez
DJ4HEALTH's Photo DJ4HEALTH Posts: 41,611
6/18/10 10:25 P

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emoticon emoticon

Dorothy

If you tell God no because He won't explain the reason He wants you to do something, you are actually hindering His blessing. But when you say yes to Him, all of heaven opens to pour out His goodness and reward your obedience. What matters more than material blessings are the things He is teaching us in our spirit.
Charles Stanley


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JENCORINNE's Photo JENCORINNE Posts: 1,933
6/18/10 9:31 P

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From GF Girl glutenfreegirl.blogspot.com/2005/09/
pe
rfect-pumpkin-pie.html

I'm pretty sure I've made the 1st one thats for pumpkin pie but you could omit the cinnamon and sugar



My favorite gluten-free pie crust, adapted from Rebecca Reilly's Gluten-Free Baking

This recipe is only slightly adapted from the excellent, essential book, Gluten-Free Baking by Rebecca Reilly. Her recipes work, and they work well. Even more important, they aren't just content to be gluten-free and barely palatable, as so many of the earliest books on gluten-free cooking were. These recipes rock. I have made half a dozen foods out of this, and not a single person has been able to guess that these are gluten-free. If you don't own this book, and you have baking experience (it's clearly not for sheer beginners) you should buy it, now.

1 cup white rice flour
1/2 cup sorghum flour
1/2 cup potato starch
3 tablespoons sweet rice flour
3 teaspoons sugar
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon strong cinnamon (I use Saigon cinnamon from World Spice Merchants)
8 tablespooons (or, one stick) cold butter
1 large egg
2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
1/4 ice-cold water, or enough to make the dough stick together

Mix together all the dry ingredients, including the sugar and cinnamon. Cut the butter into little pieces, about 1/2-inch thick and drop the pieces into the dry ingredients. Using a pastry cutter or fork, meld the butter into the dry ingredients until the butter has crumbled into pea-sized pieces.

Make a well in the dry ingredients. Drop the egg and apple cider vinegar in, then stir them in, gently, with a fork, stirring from the center out. Once they are incorporated into the dry ingredients, slowly drizzle the ice-cold water into the mixture, a little at a time, then stirring to see if it has become dough yet. You do not want this dough to be too wet. Add water only it all coheres together.

At this point, drop the ball of dough onto a large piece of parchment paper. (Prepare this ahead, unless you want to wipe dough off the box of parchment paper later!) Place another piece of parchment paper, the same size, on top of the dough. Gently, smoosh the dough outward, equally in all directions, until it is a thick, round cake of dough, about the size of a pie plate.

Refrigerate the ball of dough, for as long as you can stand. Ideally, you would prepare the dough in the evening and refrigerate overnight. Take the dough out of the refrigerator at least twenty minutes before you want to work with it.

Leave the dough in the parchment-paper sandwich and roll it out. By rolling it, gently, between the pieces of parchment paper, you will not need to add more flour to the mix. Roll it out as thin as you can, then strip the top piece of parchment paper off the dough. Gently, lay your favorite pie plate on top of the dough, then flip the whole thing over. The dough should sag into the pie plate. You can crimp the edges at this point. If some of the dough falls off the sides, don't worry. Simply re-attach the pieces to the crust-to-be by pressing in with your fingers.

You can pre-bake the pie crust, if you like. With this pumpkin pie, however, I just pour the pumpkin filling directly in and bake it immediately. It works well.

OR

DONNA JO'S DREAM PASTRY--GLUTEN FREE

Now, there are ways to make an excellent gluten-free crust without buying a mix. And I'm certain that I'll be doing that soon too. But sometimes, buying all the individual flours, plus the xantham gum, can be a little spendy. However, if you have them in your house already, or you want to make the investment, here's the recipe that Melissa from Traveler's Lunchbox left me in the comments yesterday. It looks fabulous, and it comes originally from here.



1/2 cup tapioca flour
1 cup sweet rice flour
1/2 cup cornstarch
1/4 cup potato starch flour
1 rounded tsp xanthan gum
1/2 tsp salt
dash sugar optional
1/2 cup margarine
1/2 cup butter flavored crisco
1 egg cold
1 Tblsp. GF vinegar
4 tablespoons of ice water
sweet rice flour for rolling


Blend together the flours, xanthan gum, salt, and sugar. Cut in the margarine and Crisco in small dabs until you have shortening the size of lima beans (not cornmeal).

Beat the egg using a fork; add the vinegar and ice water. Stir into the flour mixture, forming a ball. You may knead this a bit, since rice flour crusts can stand handling. Refrigerate the dough for an hour or more to chill.

Divide dough and roll out on a sweet rice-floured board (or on floured plastic wrap, for easier handling). Place in a pie tin. If using plastic wrap, remove it to the pie tin and invert the dough into the pan. Shape before removing the plastic. Bake as directed for the filling used.

For a baked crust, prick the pastry with a fork on sides and botton. Bake the crust in a pre-heated 450 oven for 10 - 12 minutes, or until slightly browned. Cool before filling. Makes enough pastry for a 2-crust 9" pie plus 1 pie shell.

Or



Gluten-Free Pie Crust
1 1/4 cup (5 ounces) almond flour (this is not the same as almond meal)
2/3 cup (2 ounces) gluten-free oat flour
2/3 cup (2 ounces) tapioca flour
1/2 cup (2 ounces) teff flour
1/2 cup (3 ounces) potato starch
1/4 cup (2 ounces) sweet rice flour
2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1/4 teaspoon guar gum
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
5 tablespoons butter, cold (or non-dairy butter sticks)
4 tablespoons leaf lard, cold (see note below)
1 large egg
6 to 8 tablespoons ice-cold water

Cranberry filling
4 cups fresh cranberries
1 1/4 cups sugar
3 tablespoons cornstarch
1 teaspoon ground nutmeg
pinch salt
3 tablespoons cold unsalted butter


Mixing the dry ingredients. In a large bowl, mix the almond flour, oat flour, tapioca flour, teff flour, and potato starch. I use a whisk here, and slow down as I mix them, repeatedly, until they have become one flour. Add the xanthan and guar gums and the salt. Mix well.

Adding the fats. Add small pieces of the ice-cold butter to the flour mixture, not much bigger than a pea. (Or, if you'd like to do as you see in the photos above, freeze your butter beforehand, then grate the frozen butter into the flours. Move quickly.) Afterward, add the leaf lard in small portions, of equal size.

Making the sandy dough. Use your hands to scoop up the flours and mix in the fats. Go slowly. Rub your hands together. Feel the fats work into the flours with your fingers. I like to lift and rub, scoop and let them all fall through my fingers. You'll know when you are done. You'll feel done. The flours will look sandy now.

Finishing the dough. Combine the egg with 3 tablespoons of the water and whisk them together. Here's where you can go two ways. If you want to do everything by hand, then do so. Add the eggy water to the dough. Work the dough together with your hands, or a rubber spatula, or whatever feels right. When the dough feels coherent, stop.

Or, you can do what I have reluctantly realized makes gluten-free pie dough even better than making it by hand: finish it in the food processor. Move the sandy dough to the food processor and turn it on. As the dough is running around and around, drizzle in the eggy water. Stop to feel the dough. If it still feels dry and not quite there, then drizzle in a bit more water. If you go too far, and the dough begins to feel sticky or wet, sprinkle in a bit of potato starch to dry it out. Again, after you make pies for awhile, you'll know this by feel alone.

Making the crust. Wrap the pie dough in plastic wrap (or in a bowl) and let it rest in the refrigerator for 15 minutes or so. Take it out and roll out the dough between two pieces of parchment paper. This means you won't work any extra flour into the dough. Roll it out as thin as you can. Thinner. Thinner. Come on, you can do it — thinner still. Carefully, lift the top piece of parchment paper and turn the dough upside down on the top of a pie plate. Rearrange until it is flat.

If the dough breaks, don't despair. Simply lift pieces of the dough off the counter and meld it with the rest of the dough. Remember, there's no gluten, so you can't overwork the dough. Play with it, like you're a kid again. Place the pie dough in the pie plate and crimp. When you have a pie dough fully built, you are ready to make pie.

Put the pie pan in the refrigerator while you preheat the oven to 325° and make the filling.

Making the cranberry filling. Put 3 cups of the cranberries in the food processor and pulse until they are coarsely chopped. Transfer them to a bowl. Add the remaining cup of cranberries. Pour in the sugar and cornstarch. Stir. Toss in the nutmeg and salt. Stir. Taste to make sure the filling matches your expectations of tartness and sweetness.

Bring the pie pan out from the refrigerator. Fill the pie pan with the cranberry filling. Put several pats of butter over the top.

Roll out the remaining pie dough between two pieces of parchment paper. Remove the top layer and lay the pie dough over the cranberries. Pinch the edges of the two doughs together, then crimp the pie dough.

Brush with an egg wash, if you want a golden crust. Make a few small slits in the top crust.

Bake until the crust is golden brown and the cranberries starting to bubble out of the slits on top, about 40 minutes. Remove from the oven and let the pie cool.

Please eat pie.

Makes 1 pie, with enough crust for bottom and top.

Some good sources for leaf lard:

-- your local butcher
-- a pig farmer at your farmers' market
-- Dietrichs Meats, a Pennsylvania Dutch butchers that sell products online


Or from GF Goddess glutenfreegoddess.blogspot.com/2008/
10
/vegan-pumpkin-pie-worthy-of.html


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6/18/10 9:09 P

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My computer time is limited, and I want to know if anyone has had success with a pie crust. My husband wants my smoked salmon and cream cheese quiche for Father's day. I'll get some regular pie crusts from the store, but would like to make one for myself.
I suppose I could just do a small individual tart with no crust and save the cals. I might, but would like to know the outcomes for others. I've read that the featherlight one is hard to work with.
Also, I'm the only one who is GF, and the guys don't like the plain rice stuff. Too sticky and "yuck."
Suggestions? Thanks.
Kate

"It is only with the heart that one sees rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye."
Antoine de Saint Exupery: The Little Prince


"To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world."
Heather Cortez
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