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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
5/21/14 9:20 P

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Do you wait too long before taking action?

www.policeone.com/columnists/charles
-r
emsberg/tips/7205578-beware-of-talkiR>ng-a-suspect-to-death/


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
4/27/14 9:05 P

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Guns painted to look like toy ones. What would you look for? This from PoliceOne:

www.policeone.com/columnists/doug-wy
ll
ie/tips/7108239-5-reminders-about-toR>y-guns-in-a-subjects-hands/?utm_sour
ce
=newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm
_campa
ign=tip&nlid=7106959


Lou

(Incidentally, this concept is one of the base ideas for the mystery I started writing a couple of years ago.)

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
4/5/14 8:24 A

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How many officer safety violations can you spot in this true life video?

www.policeone.com/videos/originals/p
ol
iceone-roll-call/6966652-Reality-TraR>ining-Drug-Interdiction-at-Traffic-S
to
ps?utm_source=newsletter_&utm_me
dium=e
mail&utm_campaign=topFeatureBlock


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
3/10/14 7:55 P

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Yet another hidden handcuff key:

www.policeone.com/columnists/Doug-Wy
ll
ie/tips/6703500-Ring-in-2014-Watch-fR>or-this-concealed-cuff-key?source=ne
ws
letter&nlid=6707603§ion_name=tip


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
3/10/14 7:28 P

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From PoliceOne.com -- New hidden handcuff key:

www.policeone.com/columnists/Doug-Wy
ll
ie/tips/6847409-Watch-for-this-Tiny-R>Inconspicuous-cuff-key


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
12/21/13 5:44 P

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From PoliceOne.com:

www.policeone.com/columnists/Doug-Wy
ll
ie/tips/6680664-Pay-attention-to-hanR>dcuffed-subjects


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
9/4/13 10:32 P

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www.policeone.com/columnists/Charles
-R
emsberg/tips/6428984-Covert-weapon-wR>arning-Beware-the-Strike-Spike?sourc
e=
newsletter&nlid=6427211


Covert weapon warning: Beware the Strike Spike

Lou



"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
7/21/13 9:12 P

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More info on fake containers that could hide drugs and warnings about general officer safety:

www.policeone.com/videos/originals/t
ra
ining/6324849-Surviving-hidden-weapoR>ns/?source=newsletter&nlid=6329596


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
6/8/13 8:16 A

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Another example of poor pat down. Officer could have been killed.

www.policeone.com/Officer-Safety/art
ic
les/6263557-Suspect-fires-gun-from-bR>ack-of-squad-killed-by-police/?sourc
e=
newsletter&nlid=6263885
-- Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
5/11/13 11:47 P

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How carefully do you do pat downs?

www.policeone.com/Officer-Safety/art
ic
les/6224252-Video-Drunk-suspect-pullR>s-loaded-gun-in-back-of-squad/?sourc
e=
newsletter&nlid=6224817


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
4/19/13 11:22 P

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From PoliceOne. Should you be carrying more extra rounds than you do now?

www.policeone.com/police-heroes/arti
cl
es/6199620-Why-one-cop-carries-145-rR>ounds-of-ammo-on-the-job/?source=new
sl
etter&nlid=6198334
-- Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
1/23/13 11:07 P

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From PoliceOne: Hidden Handcuff Keys
*******
www.policeone.com/columnists/Doug-Wy
ll
ie/tips/6096955-Watch-for-these-hiddR>en-handcuff-keys


Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 1/23/2013 (23:07)
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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
9/25/12 11:11 P

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From PoliceOne.com:


Police Driving:
Safety Behind the Wheel
by Capt. Travis Yates

10 deadly errors cops make on the roadways
An often invisible enemy awaits to take the lives of America's Finest

Roadway deaths have been the leading on-duty killer to law enforcement for more than a decade so it is time we add a new list of 10 errors in the minds of today’s warriors

In 1973 and 1974, we lost an unbelievable 548 officers in the line of duty — 278 of those succumbed to felonious gunfire. It was this context and the fact that 51 of those line of duty deaths occurred in California that led to a groundbreaking book by Los Angeles Police Detective Pierce R. Brooks in 1975.

The book, Officer Down Code 3, was written by Brooks through a deep belief that many of the line of duty deaths could be prevented.

In 1975, Calibre Press did not exist — Charles Remsberg had not yet written his famous Street Survival textbooks, and the concept of Officer Survival Training was non-existent so to say that Pierce Brooks was before his time is an understatement.

Applying Brooks’ Method Today
Well, 37 years later, it’s doubtful you will find a copy of Officer Down Code 3 at your agency, but every cop out there has seen and heard the remnants of Brooks’ work.

Don’t get “Tombstone Courage” your FTO told you but he heard it from someone else who heard it from another who had read it in Brooks’ book. That saying was part of Brooks’ famous Identification of the “10 Deadly Errors” that he observed was killing officers and, at the time he wrote them, at a record rate.

Whether it was “Failure to Watch Hands” or “Poor Search” or “Improper or No Handcuffing,” the errors listed by Brooks found their way in the lingo of every officer and on posters that hang today.

The original work one LAPD Detective (often mentioned by Sergeant Joe Friday — Dragnet — in the opening monologue as the Lieutenant on duty) conducted close to 40 years ago remains valid today and we should continue to follow each and every rule listed but if we stop there, we are making a grave mistake.

It’s a different time in our profession than it was in 1975 and while violence continues to plague our profession, an often invisible enemy awaits to take the lives of America’s Finest.

Roadway deaths have been the leading on duty killer to law enforcement for more than a decade and in July we were once again reminded at how devastating this enemy is when we lost 11 officers in that month alone to this epidemic.

It is time we add a new list of ten errors in the minds of today’s warriors...

1.) Failure to Wear Seatbelt
It’s listed first because it is the easiest to correct. Close to half of every officer killed behind the wheel were not wearing a seatbelt. The excuses are many but the tragedy this mistake causes is unspeakable.

2.) Speed Kills
We warn our kids of this danger but it applies to our profession as well. The difference between 80 mph and 100 mph over ten miles is a mere 90 seconds. Excessive speed is a tremendous risk and unfortunately a week rarely goes by where we don’t hear of another line of duty death involving an officer at high speeds in a single vehicle crash.

3.) Multitasking
In 1975, you may have seen a hand held radio and a notepad in a police car. Today, the inside looks like a spaceship. We have always required officers to multi-task but they now face an increasing danger as laptops and cameras replace pens and notepads. There is a time and place for it in our profession but any additional duties behind the wheel besides driving should be done with extreme caution.

4.) Tunnel Vision
We have long known the dangers of tunnel vision in deadly force encounters as stress will often cause the loss of peripheral vision but we must be just as concerned behind the wheel. When the lights and siren go on, we often encounter tunnel vision and that combined with driving can be deadly. When you hear your siren, don’t trust your peripheral vision but turn your head and look.

5.) Fatigue
Brooks identified this in his list and it must remain here. We may never know to the extent that fatigue plays in roadway tragedy in our profession but evidence suggests that fatigue continues to be a factor in our safety both on the road and off.

6.) Failure to Clear Intersections
The most dangerous time during a shift is proceeding through intersections. The failure to clear each lane, whether in normal driving or emergency response, can be devastating. It’s not the intersection that will kill you...it’s the side impact collision.

7.) Failure to Wear Reflective Vest
It’s mandated on a federally funded highway but should be worn whenever we step foot out of our vehicle and into traffic.

8.) Improper Tire Maintenance
The only piece of vehicle equipment between you and the road is indeed the most important. A tire with cuts, poor tread or that is under or over inflated can be deadly.

9.) Improper Use of Tire Deflation Devices
The tool consists of a string and sharp objects and the training is often conducted with a short video with little or no practical experience. That combined with high speed vehicles contributes to deaths in our profession every year. An officer should never be standing at or near the roadway when deploying but unfortunately the nature of the activity leads all too often with officers placing themselves in harms way. If you cannot deploy these devices away from the roadway while using cover/concealment (and a police car doesn’t count) then they should not be used.

10.) Tombstone Courage
This term was originally made famous by Pierce Brooks but it also applies to roadways. We drive everyday and most days nothing out of the ordinary happens behind the wheel. It is only natural to get overconfident behind the wheel which will lead to Tombstone Courage. As Brooks described over three decades ago, this behavior will send you to the grave.

Conclusion
Nothing can take the place of the work of Pierce R. Brooks and every law enforcement officer working today owes a great deal of gratitude to this man. The list above is just a small contribution to an effort by many to reduce line of duty deaths. To be fair, this was not completely my idea.

I have the privilege to be involved in an effort from the State of California called the SAFE Campaign. While at a meeting last year, the work of Brooks came up in discussion and I and others immediately saw value in addressing roadways in a similar fashion. On behalf of that effort, I hope these ten reminders will contribute to your everyday safety practices.


About the author:

Captain Travis Yates commands the Precision Driver Training Unit with the Tulsa, Okla. Police Department. He is a nationally recognized driving instructor and a certified instructor in tire deflation devices and the pursuit intervention technique. Capt. Yates has a Master of Science Degree in Criminal Justice from Northeastern State University and is a graduate of the FBI National Academy. He is the owner of www.policedriving.com, a website dedicated to law enforcement driving issues and the Director of Ten-Four Ministries, dedicated to providing practical and spiritual support to the law enforcement community. You may contact Travis at Policedriving@yahoo.com.

-- Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
9/5/12 8:16 P

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Does the amount of water you drink affect your safety? Read on.


10-8: Life on the Line
with Charles Remsberg
Tip: Staying hydrated in every season

Falling behind with your drinking?

We’re talking water here. And it’s an officer safety issue.

Just because we’ve traversed the ‘dog days of summer’ and are rapidly approaching the beginning of autumn doesn’t mean that the dangers of dehydration have passed. Cooler temperatures can lull you into a false sense that you’re not prone to dehydration dangers which were so obvious in July and August.

New research findings from the University of Connecticut’s Human Performance Laboratory confirm that even mild dehydration can have a significant impact on your vigilance, concentration, working memory, tension and anxiety levels, and degree of fatigue—all important elements in staying alert for threat cues and being capable of fast reactions on the street.

Although both sexes are affected, researchers report that females may be even more susceptible to the loss of water and salts essential for normal body function. And the adverse effects can occur whether you’re sitting at a computer or involved in heavy physical exertion. It’s all a matter of sufficient fluid intake.

UConn researchers led by international hydration expert Dr. Lawrence Armstrong tested two groups of young, healthy, and active volunteers: 25 women with an average age of 23 and 26 men averaging 20 years old. After walking treadmills in a warm room to induce water loss, the subjects were put through a series of cognitive tests measured by the study team. Outcomes were later compared to results obtained when the same participants remained well-hydrated via mineral water during their exercising.

The comparisons showed that even mild dehydration—as little as 1.5 percent loss in the body’s normal water volume, about the amount that may make you feel thirsty—had a significant impact on energy level and the ability to think clearly.

Specifically, the females especially tended to experience fatigue, confusion, and difficulty concentrating, while among the males “difficulty with mental tasks, particularly in the areas of vigilance and working memory,” was noted, along with increased fatigue, tension, and anxiety.

“Adverse changes in mood and symptoms were substantially greater in females than in males, both at rest and during exercise,” the researchers stated, although they could not explain why. In any case, performance notably suffered from dehydration in both genders.

Other university studies have found that dehydration also affects muscle strength, by as much as 10 percent to 20 percent. In addition, some researchers say that chronic improper hydration may also be related to depression.

You may think about drinking water only when you’re thirsty, but “our thirst sensation doesn’t really appear until we are already one or two percent dehydrated—too late,” Armstrong explains. “By then dehydration is already starting to impact how our mind and body perform.”

According to the Mayo Clinic, “Dehydration occurs when you lose more fluid than you take in, and your body doesn’t have enough water and other fluids to carry out its normal functions. You can usually reverse [or prevent] mild to moderate dehydration by drinking more fluids.”

Daily Health News points out that “it’s easy to know when you’re really dehydrated—your mouth is parched, you’re likely overheated, and all you can think about is chugging a giant glass of ice-cold water. But knowing when you’re mildly dehydrated—far more common—is much harder, because the signs aren’t always as apparent.”

To stay properly hydrated, even if you’re largely sedentary, Armstrong recommends that you regularly drink about 2 liters of water—approximately eight 8-ounce glasses—during a normal day, “and not just during exercise, extreme heat, or exertion.”

With greater exposure to dehydrating circumstances, drink more and more often.

He says you can check your hydration status by monitoring the color of your urine. If you’re properly hydrated, it should be a “very pale yellow.” Dark yellow or tan suggests dehydration.

In the past, experts have cautioned that caffeinated drinks can contribute to dehydration. But researchers at UConn and the University of Nebraska Medical Center have concluded that water, caffeinated, and non-caffeinated drinks can all provide similar levels of hydration.

However, alcohol does tend to dehydrate the body because of its diuretic effects. Research has shown that the amount of water lost in urination is in direct correlation to the percentage of alcohol contained in what you drink. In short, the higher the alcohol content, the less hydration you’ll be able to maintain.

So, bottoms up with that water bottle! And stay safer.


About the author
Charles Remsberg co-founded the original Street Survival Seminar and the Street Survival Newsline, authored three of the best-selling law enforcement training textbooks, and helped produce numerous award-winning training videos. His nearly three decades of work earned him the prestigious O.W. Wilson Award for outstanding contributions to law enforcement and the American Police Hall of Fame Honor Award for distinguished achievement in public service.


"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
8/13/12 8:58 A

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Beware of weapons disguised as everyday items. Such as this key chain gun. -- Lou
*******
By Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor in Chief

I routinely receive officer safety information and other types of tactical tips from a wide variety of LEOs out there. Earlier this week, I received a memo (information originating from a large East Coast agency) which I immediately wanted to pass along to all the officers across the United States who visit PoliceOne.

Having now received permission from the individual who wrote the advisory — I’ve deliberately not used his name or department as he did not specify that I could do so — let’s talk a little bit about improvised concealed firearms. First off, let’s look at the image from this week’s memo.

ddq74coujkv1i.cloudfront.net/Tactica
lT
ip-Image-071812-V3.jpg


As the Unclassified/FOUO/LES document read, “This weapon can appear to be a common key ring, a vehicle remote controller or MP3 player. It can be carried in a pocket or around the neck. It recently gained attention due to it being the murder weapon in a night club shooting. The firearm is four inches in length and is capable of firing two 32 caliber rounds. The ring on the base of the gun is twisted to cock the weapon and there are two trigger buttons. The Key Ring Gun is not very accurate with such a short barrel but at close range it has proven to be lethal. This concealable firearm poses yet another threat to law enforcement officers.”

For centuries, armorers’ handmade firearms had varying degrees of accuracy at any long range, but at bad-breath distance were plenty “good enough” to be deadly.

Today, we have easy-to-get machinery which illegal (albeit enterprising) manufacturers can secret in their barn or their basement, cranking out black-market guns such as the one seen above.

Further, individual violators — when sufficiently motivated — can make their own, one-of-a-kind gun which is just as deadly as one of those “cottage industry” items out there in number.

The point here, of course, is to carefully inspect any and all articles found on a subject, and to be aware of the fact that even a subject who appears compliant can turn deadly in an instant.

Trust your gut, call for back-up, search your subject and don’t be insulted when your backup insists on doing another search. Use proper contact/cover tactics, and always, always, always, watch the hands!

One last note: If your PD sends out email advisories to officers with information which may be of particular use to officers outside your agency, please consider sending that stuff to me directly via email. This is equally useful for when you have your own, individually-created information but do not want to post it as a Member Tip.

Just advise as to whether or not your information is “open source” — meaning that it’s widely available around the Internet, and therefore not something we need to password protect — or it’s something like today’s item, which is accessible here on the site only by PoliceOne Members who we’ve actively confirmed to be LEO / LEO (ret.).

Stay safe out there.
— Doug Wyllie, PoliceOne Editor in Chief



Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 8/13/2012 (09:07)
"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
5/8/12 6:48 A

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Several good tips in this article about stopping motorcyclists and people on snowmobiles or ATVs. Watch for helmets, attached holsters, ankle weapons and gas cap daggers.

www.policeone.com/traffic-patrol/tip
s/
5495995-Dont-let-that-riders-helmet-R>become-a-weapon/


Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
3/27/12 9:49 P

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More on passenger side approaches on traffic stops, from PoliceOne.com:


The passenger-side approach on car stops

Submitted by:
Dave Akell

"I would always at least consider a passenger-side approach on car stops — I’ve come to utilize this tactic almost 100 percent of the time. There are many sound “tactical” reasons for this:

1) You won't have your back to traffic not only placing you in obvious danger, but causing your attention to be somewhat split at times. Traffic is a far greater threat than the operator is 99.9 percent of the time.

2) This approach also makes it difficult for an operator to engage you quickly with a firearm without turning his/her body first in a particularly overt manner, especially for a right handed shooter.

3) There is more distance between you and your potential attacker, not to mention an automobile. This makes for a nice buffer, creating not only a reactionary gap, but potential cover as well.

4) This approach surprises many operators, as they are expecting you to approach from the driver’s side because this has been the SOP for so many for so long.

5) The passenger side approach allows you to scan the entire interior of the vehicle before the operator even knows you are there in many cases. You will usually have to knock on the passenger window, often startling the operator. Better them than you.

6) Once you are situated off the passenger window you have a decent view of all occupants, as opposed to your side being exposed to rear seat passengers when you make initial contact with the operator.

I feel (author speaking) that failure to utilize this option most of the time is a mistake, and an easy fix. A note to trainers: try running force on force scenarios using both approaches, especially in a single operator situation. This demonstrates the above points better than reading about them can!"

Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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DSHIZNIT00's Photo DSHIZNIT00 SparkPoints: (4,280)
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1/29/12 11:19 P

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I won't go into a whole mess of detail but...

1. Passenger side approaches.
2. Handcuff them while they are still inside the car.
3. Keep talking to the bad guys, mess with their OODA Loop, move around a bit.
4. Use Contact-Cover. If you work with a guy that likes to do it all, take a cover position. You're just as important in that role as anything else.
5. Don't cancel your backup when going to a domestic even if the "caller" says the aggressor is gone. They might come back or your caller could be lying to the dispatcher.

STILLAMARINE's Photo STILLAMARINE Posts: 15
1/29/12 3:45 P

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I work midnights, in a not so friendly side of town (5 found dead in a house early this morning after a robbery call went out http://blog.al.com/spotnews/2012/01/birmin
gham_police_seek_informa_1.html ), No matter what, when I make a traffic stop my weapon is out behind my leg until after my first contact. Same thing with 911 hang ups, most domestics, and unknown calls. Also we have many officers that make traffic and ped stops with out getting out on the radio. I'm a pretty firm believer in getting out on the radio. Granted it may happen a time or two but I hate hearing someone get on the radio and saying hold me on a traffic stop can you run this driver for me. That means they've already made initial contact and noone knew where they were incase it got ugly.

No day but today.
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1/24/12 1:45 A

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In my Criminal Justice Class last year, I read that traffic fatalities was the leading cause of death in the line of duty for officers. I figured this mostly had to do with car chases and accidents. However, while doing a little reading I came across this article that I thought was interesting.

www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2011-01
-0
4-1Acopdeaths04_ST_N.htm


I'm not judging because I don't have the perspective of being in that situation. I just hadn't considered the seat belt issue.

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1/24/12 1:41 A

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Wow, that is interesting.

From what I've read in my criminal justice class, approaching a car you've pulled over is one of the more dangerous times when working because you never know what kind of person you have pulled over. I've seen a few examples of this on America's Most Wanted. My professor said it was extremely important to take extra care and caution when doing so. The danger comes when you begin to treat stops as routine.

Still, I imagine it can be hard not to begin to view stops with even a slight bit less alertness than probably suggested by a professor and maybe being on the lookout for such stickers will make an officer more cautious in a situation he or she may not otherwise be. I'll definately try to keep this information in mind.

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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
12/13/11 10:49 P

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Be aware of so-called "Sovereign Citizens" who often make their own license plates and have bumper stickers on their vehicles reading: “I am an American National” or “Not Subject to Corporate Federal or Corporate State Jurisdiction.”

These people are a growing clique that some estimate at 300,000. They are usually heavily armed. Not knowing this caused two West Memphis, Arkansas, officers to lose their lives during a traffic stop. One was the chief's son.

Bob Paudert, who had served as Chief of the West Memphis P.D. until his retirement two months ago said in an interview he’s convinced his officers might be alive today if they “knew what they had” in Jerry Kane, and his 16-year-old son, Joe.

When Sgt. Brandon Paudert and Officer Bill Evans approached the minivan they pulled over they simply didn’t have information that would have helped them recognize the threat Kane and his son posed. These "Sovereign Citizens" are also growing in intensity of action.

So if stopping a vehicle with such stickers, be on high alert and don't hesitate to call for backup. Your life may depend on it.

Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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12/13/11 10:34 P

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Remember: On almost every call you respond to the suspects can see you before you see them. Be vigilant as you approach a scene and take in possible hiding places and people who may not seem to be part of the problem but who actually may be. Being alert = improved odds of going home safely. -- Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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11/17/11 10:10 A

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Think your patrol car can't be a target? Think again. -- Lou

PoliceOne Senior Editor Doug Wyllie
Tip: Check your take-home squad

The recent report of a Florida man who was just convicted of (among other things) rigging a booby trap outside the home of an officer whose unmarked cruiser was parked there, serves as a reminder of the safety issues surrounding take-home squads. In this instance the man rigged a trip cord attached to a board studded with barbed, feces-smeared nails that was placed on the way to the officer’s car. Had the officer been less alert on his walk out to the vehicle, the trap may have successfully injured/infected him.

Remember that a police car — marked or unmarked — can be a ready target for tampering and can, if parked in an obvious spot outside your house, alert offenders bent on finding a cop’s home to the fact that an officer lives there. If you bring a squad home, consider parking it away from your house if possible or in a garage. Be sure to check around and under the unit before getting in and driving off and remain alert for anything out of the ordinary in your path, such as the trip wire the alert Florida officer thankfully spotted.

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
11/11/11 9:38 P

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Can what you eat equal officer safety? Here is one thought, from PoliceOne (PoliceOne.com):

Editor's Corner
with PoliceOne Senior Editor Doug Wyllie

Tip: Lighten up! Choose salad for lunch


What's the first thing that'll happen after you devour that mid-shift Philly Cheesesteak sandwich and fries? Yep, foot pursuit.

During a ride-along I did recently with a large Bay Area agency, two cars (including mine, obviously) brought chow back to the company. Three of us had big salads--the fourth had a variation on the above mentioned "fried meat on jumbo roll with a heaping pile of fries."

Back in our car, the guy I was riding with said something to the effect of, "I can't do that [heavy meals on shift] anymore. With my luck, I’d get into a track meet with some 16-year-old bolt of lightning right after lunch."

I was reminded of this just last week when after spending some quality time on the 200-yard range with two officers from another Bay Area agency. Packing up our gear, we unanimously voted for lunch at one of those "Fresh Choice" type places. We left well-fed, but light on our feet and ready for anything the afternoon might bring.

Eating light in the mid-day has a bevy of benefits, but for our purposes let's remember just these two:

1.) In the short term, you will be better able to perform the type of short-burst, high-intensity physical activity that is central to a patrol officer’s daily experience.

2.) In the long term, you will very probably shed any unnecessary fat that makes for excess body weight, and lower your cholesterol levels, preventing heart attacks.

It’s untrue that "the only thing that can 'eat light' is an interstellar black hole." Coppers (and police website editors) can reap healthy rewards by choosing the soup and salad option as often as it’s made available.

Lou

Edited by: IUHRYTR at: 11/11/2011 (21:40)
"Always believe in yourself!"

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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
10/26/11 12:13 A

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Law enforcement officers should always practice drawing their firearms after they put on their gunbelt and before they take it off. But they should also practice what probably less than 1% do and that is practice drawing while seated in their patrol car. The unexpected is thinking nothing will happen while inside their car to cause them to draw. That thinking could add another name to the list of officers killed in the line of duty. Don't become another statistic -- practice! -- Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
9/17/11 12:07 A

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Traditionally, when an officer approaches a suspect with his/her hands in their pant's or coat's pockets, the officer commands the person to "Show me your hands." This may not always be the smartest and safest way to handle this.

It may be smarter to ask the person, "Other than your hands, and without taking your hands out of your pockets, what is in your pockets?" or some such.

If you, as the officer, wants the person to remove their hands from their pockets, have the person face away from you and order them to take one hand 9direct which one) from their pocket then hold their arm straight over their head with their fingers and thumb spread apart. Then do the same with the other hand. An alternative to holding their hand in the air is to order them to do that then, when you're sure the hand is empty, order them to put that hand behind their back with their palm facing you, giving you a chance to ensure the hand is empty and getting the person in a position for handcuffing. -- Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
9/14/11 11:26 P

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When in a foot pursuit, be aware of shadows you make because of sunshine, moonlight or streetlights, especially after the suspect has gone around a corner and could be watching your shadow and waiting to attack. -- Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
8/10/11 2:29 A

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Do not wear your handcuff case in the small of your back as in the old days. If you fall or are pushed and land on your back you may injure your spine when you land on that hard case.

This may sound strange but I wore my handcuff case on the right front (my strong side) of my gunbelt. I had my OC case first, closest to the belt buckle, then the handcuff case then my weapon. Not only did this protect my back but made getting my cuffs out easier with either hand in case one hand was injured or being held by someone. Also, I could then grab my OC case and tuck my elbow against my weapon holster for OC, cuff and weapon retention yet still have easy access to all three.

Many officers wear their cuffs on their weak side hip but if that arm is incapacitated or being held by someone, they can not reach far enough behind them to get their cuffs.

Lou

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"Decide to be happy!"


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MJUSTICEROB's Photo MJUSTICEROB SparkPoints: (6,197)
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8/8/11 3:44 P

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I went to several different police magazine websites and many of them mentioned the most recent officer fatalities, so I think this week should definately be officer safety.

I watched America's most wanted when it was still on and early this year, January and February, there was 4 police officers dead in Florida and 11 shot across the country. Furthermore, an article at the end of 2010 stated that police fatalities were up 40% across the United States.

The danger that comes with this profession is real and can happen at any time.

Edited by: MJUSTICEROB at: 3/26/2012 (03:26)
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IUHRYTR's Photo IUHRYTR Posts: 15,830
8/8/11 9:29 A

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Let's share our officer safety tips here.

* After getting dressed in uniform with gunbelt, etc., on, jump up and down. If anything jangles, it is too noisy, if anything comes loose, tighten it or it will come loose at the worse time.

* After putting on gunbelt, draw your firearm at least 10 times, then again before taking it off.

What others do you have?

Lou

"Always believe in yourself!"

"Decide to be happy!"


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