Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
7/16/09 10:49 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Congrats on your success!

TENISWHIZ's Photo TENISWHIZ SparkPoints: (35,890)
Fitness Minutes: (49,969)
Posts: 8,565
7/15/09 5:37 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
WONG, DRC, GLAD... Thanks for the tips, encouragement and advice! I've transferred Wong's step by step instructions onto a Word doc. and am printing it out.

I have to admit...it kind of sounds FUN to try!

BTW... Before DH came home, I figured out how to balance out and not make the rim brakes rub all on my own! Haven't ridden it yet (due to high winds today), so hopefully, it won't fall apart when I do! LOL

Again...thanks for those directions and tips!!!!!
emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon


Leader/Co Leader of:

Beautiful Beagles Team,

lynnkirchhoff.wordpress.com/


 Pounds lost: 3.0 
 
0
6.25
12.5
18.75
25
GLADGAD's Photo GLADGAD Posts: 5,623
7/15/09 1:50 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
One thing to mention if you are dealing with a real flat is to run your hand (preferably gloved) around the inside of the tire to loosen anything that might have gotten inside causing the flat - such as small pieces of glass, thorns, little rocks, etc.

-Carolyn

"God gave you your body as a gift, so you should take care of it." - My Mom
DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
7/15/09 12:09 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
GLAD, I love the idea of building a bike myself so I know EVERYTHING!

WONGERCHI, as usual, great step by step instructions. And you are so right--learn now so it will never become a problem.

WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/15/09 10:19 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
TENIS:
Why wait until after your tri to learn? You already said that you "FEAR" a flat on the bike, why not know how to deal with it before your race? That makes no sense to me. On your easy or off days, allocate an hour and get practising. Once you at least know how to change a tire then that fear is going to be GONE.

And if you do it now, if you're not sure you can at least take it into the LBS to see if you did it right. Although you'll know if you did it wrong as you'll puncture the tube.

Here's how I do it:

1) Deflate tire and remove wheel from bike. Open brakes and QR and drop the wheel out. If it's rear wheel, shift chain onto smallest cog before dropping wheel out.

2) Starting opposite the valve stem, I insert a tire lever (plastic, DEFINITELY not metal) into one side of the tire. Hook it under one edge of the tire - this is called a "bead". Lift off the bead that's closest to you, and hook the lever onto one of the spokes.

3) Move along a couple of spokes and repeat step #2. Generally this should result in the entire bead coming unseated. Run the tire lever all the way around the tire to get it off.

4) Remove the nut on the valve stem (if it's there) and push the valve stem towards the outside of the wheel. This should give you enough innertube to take off.

5) Remove the other bead of the tire. You should now be left with a tire, a tube and a wheel.

6) Take the tire and put one bead back on. Do this all the way round. Make sure the label of the tire lines up with the hole where the valve stem goes.

7) Inflate the tube slightly so that it takes shape. Then, insert the valve stem into the hole, and stuff the tube into the tire.

8) Then, starting OPPOSITE the valve stem, put in the second bead. Go a third of the way round one way, then do the other side. You should be able to get about 3/4 of the tire on, no worries.

9) Deflate the tube, and with your hands push the back side of the tire towards the middle while pushing the front of the tire on at the same time. If everything goes well then the remainder of the bead should pop on. This it the hardest step of all. If it doesn't go on by hand you can use a tire lever - hook the lever underneath the rim and slide the tire on. BY HAND is the best method.

10) Push the valve stem in all the way a couple of times. This helps free the tube around the stem if it's caught on the bead.

11) Go all the way round the tire, making sure the innertube is not sticking out anywhere. If it is, you should be able to wiggle it back in. If it's difficult, add a touch of air to the tube.

12) Pump up tire to half pressure and check that it's seated properly. There should be no bulges or anything, anywhere.

13) Stick wheel back onto bike, making sure it's straight and level. If it's rear wheel, make sure your chain is on the bottom cog otherwise your shifting gets messed up.

14) Pump up tire to full pressure and you're done!


Seriously, practise, practise, practise. There is no reason to be scared about changing a tire, but if there's one thing that's guaranteed, you WILL flat at some point, so why not learn now? I took 30 minutes per tire when I first started, now I'm down to 5-10 minutes.


HELENGUNTHER:
Vittoria PitStop is what you want for tubbies. The guys I know who regularly ride tubbies have a can of that and a spare tire to deal with flats. If you have to change the tire then you can just roll on a new tubbie, just don't take corners too fast! At least that's what I've heard - I ride clinchers, me.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


 current weight: 190.0 
 
210
202.5
195
187.5
180
GLADGAD's Photo GLADGAD Posts: 5,623
7/15/09 8:04 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I learned how to change a flat through my BF (a cyclist) and also at a clinic held by a tri group I belong to. I am confident that I'll be able to do it in a race.

One thing to mention is if you're practicing changing a flat, make sure that you have a little air in the tube before trying to put it in the tire. Just inflate until it has its shape - its so much easier to handle that way.

I've always thought it would be cool to build a bike from scratch. That way I would know everything about the bike and how to fix it.

-Carolyn

"God gave you your body as a gift, so you should take care of it." - My Mom
TENISWHIZ's Photo TENISWHIZ SparkPoints: (35,890)
Fitness Minutes: (49,969)
Posts: 8,565
7/14/09 9:52 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Helen...H3Hound mentioned a product after my inital post. Is that what you are looking for?

DRC & Helen... thanks to you both for the REI tip. There's an REI about 12-15 miles from me. I'll check it out! Thanks!!!


Leader/Co Leader of:

Beautiful Beagles Team,

lynnkirchhoff.wordpress.com/


 Pounds lost: 3.0 
 
0
6.25
12.5
18.75
25
HELENGUNTHER's Photo HELENGUNTHER Posts: 286
7/14/09 7:57 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Okay, first of all, remember, blonde is the new smart! And I'm sure none of us laughed at you because we have all done some pretty silly things as we learn to be multi sport athletes. It's not like they gave you any instructions when you left the bike shop!

That being said, I do think it's important for anyone on a bike to know how to do general maintenance and repairs. REI offers free clinics from time to time, and so do local triathlon clubs and bike/triathlon shops. I think you just have to check a variety of different web sites.
I'm curious about the tubular patching. What do you use and how do you use it? I spent time before my first race learning how to change a tubular, but then in my second race I dropped my spare tire on the course and had to stop and pick it up. I understand there's a product that seals the hole and then you don't need to carry a tire.
Any info on that would be appreciated.

 current weight: 117.0 
 
129
126
123
120
117
DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
7/14/09 7:02 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
The first time I had a flat on the road was right after a check at the LBS. And they put the wheel back on too tight for me to loosen out on the road. So while I knew what to do (I'd practiced), I couldn't get to the tire! Does that make you feel any better?

In addition to your LBS, REI is a national store that does regular bike maintenance clinics for free. Here's a link to the one of the classes.

www.rei.com/stores/store_event_detai
l.
jsp?pid=F84C49E29E0D582D47554DD3ACF9R>EFE0&template_id=30&template_family=
we
bDetail&ignore_cache=1




TENISWHIZ's Photo TENISWHIZ SparkPoints: (35,890)
Fitness Minutes: (49,969)
Posts: 8,565
7/14/09 5:47 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
WONG... Thanks for your advice too. You are like our resident expert! Thanks for not laughing either (or at least in front of me.....LOL!). I figure at least I asked and didn't hide the fact that I don't know how to do it. I really do want to know. I may look those books up on half.com and do as you suggest. I think I will wait until AFTER my next triathlon, Aug. 9th. Just in case I totally mess up my bike. In the interim, I'll use this other product as insurance. But you are definitely right... We should all know how to change a tire!

Thanks again for your advice!


Leader/Co Leader of:

Beautiful Beagles Team,

lynnkirchhoff.wordpress.com/


 Pounds lost: 3.0 
 
0
6.25
12.5
18.75
25
H3HOUND's Photo H3HOUND SparkPoints: (5,082)
Fitness Minutes: (5,472)
Posts: 557
7/14/09 5:24 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Agree with that. I carry a repair kit on training rides and the Pitstop during races. Unless I am on my 'tubies'!

-After 40 PRs-
50k trail: 6:53:51
26.2: 3:50:23
30K trail: 3:52:28
Oly Tri: 2:48:33
13.1: 1:43:43
10K: 46:17
5-miler: 37:28
5K: 21:06

Maintenance Range Ticker - Center is Ideal


 Pounds lost: 7.0 
 
0
7.5
15
22.5
30
WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
7/14/09 5:14 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I can't believe the number of triathletes and cyclists out there who don't know how to change a tire. In my opinion, it's the only bike mechanical skill that EVERYONE has to know how to do. Like all things, you only get better by practise. Just let the air out of both your tires, take them and the inner tubes off and put them back on again. Do it at home first - you don't want your first flat in a race or when it's cold, dark and raining.

I learnt to change a flat simply by practising it in my garage. At first it took ages, now I can do a leisurely change in under 10 minutes. If you need instructions then there are some good ones on the net or I can take you through it step-by-step, at least the way I do it.

For other mechanical things I bought a couple of books - the Park Tool Big Blue Book of Bicycle Repair and Zinn and the Art of Roadbike Maintenance. Then I set about doing it, following the instructions in the book. If I wasn't sure, I'd do the fix and then take it to the LBS for a quick inspection. Bikes generally only go together one way, which is very nice - if it doesn't fit or it's loose then you've done something wrong.

These days I do cassette, chain, pedal and brake pad swaps, and front and rear brake and derailleur adjustments. At a pinch I can re-cable the bike and true wheels in case of spoke breakage. I've learnt these skills simply by tinkering around over the past couple of years.

I'm impressed that you managed to take off your brakes. We'd need to know what type they are before we (I) can tell you how to fix them...


H3HOUND:
A friend of mine uses PitStop for his tubbies and likes them a lot. I still think TENIS should learn to change a tube though...

Edited by: WONGERCHI at: 7/14/2009 (17:17)
In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


 current weight: 190.0 
 
210
202.5
195
187.5
180
H3HOUND's Photo H3HOUND SparkPoints: (5,082)
Fitness Minutes: (5,472)
Posts: 557
7/14/09 5:06 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
PitStop is not really Slime. Its more like a Fix-A-Flat for your bike. It inflates and injects a sealant.

Slime is heavy and hard to get past the valve.

Good Luck!

-After 40 PRs-
50k trail: 6:53:51
26.2: 3:50:23
30K trail: 3:52:28
Oly Tri: 2:48:33
13.1: 1:43:43
10K: 46:17
5-miler: 37:28
5K: 21:06

Maintenance Range Ticker - Center is Ideal


 Pounds lost: 7.0 
 
0
7.5
15
22.5
30
TENISWHIZ's Photo TENISWHIZ SparkPoints: (35,890)
Fitness Minutes: (49,969)
Posts: 8,565
7/14/09 5:03 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Thanks... I did have some "Slime" last year in case I got a flat. Not sure what happened to it! Good reminder.


Leader/Co Leader of:

Beautiful Beagles Team,

lynnkirchhoff.wordpress.com/


 Pounds lost: 3.0 
 
0
6.25
12.5
18.75
25
H3HOUND's Photo H3HOUND SparkPoints: (5,082)
Fitness Minutes: (5,472)
Posts: 557
7/14/09 4:59 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
A good local bike shop (LBS) will sometime put on clinics and will certainly help you if you bought a bike from them.

The hardest part about repairing a flat on a clincher is getting the tire back on. Takes a good grip and patience. You also have the option of one of these for the race: http://www.trisports.com/vipitst.html


Good stuff here too:
http://www.parktool.com/

-After 40 PRs-
50k trail: 6:53:51
26.2: 3:50:23
30K trail: 3:52:28
Oly Tri: 2:48:33
13.1: 1:43:43
10K: 46:17
5-miler: 37:28
5K: 21:06

Maintenance Range Ticker - Center is Ideal


 Pounds lost: 7.0 
 
0
7.5
15
22.5
30
TENISWHIZ's Photo TENISWHIZ SparkPoints: (35,890)
Fitness Minutes: (49,969)
Posts: 8,565
7/14/09 4:43 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
OK... Here's a good laugh and an honest question!

I had trouble getting my front tire inflated. Back one was OK. Thought something was wrong with the thingamajig you put the air pump on to inflate (can't even name these parts!). Figured, why take the whole bike in...just take the wheel off...everyone else does...start acting "normal" ...start acting "smart". Well, I should have trusted my gut instinct (knowing thyself) and just taken the whole stinkin' bike in. I took the wheel off wrong! Wrong, you say? Isn't that impossible? Not with me it isn't! Duhhhh... Rather than flip the lever up to release the breaks to get the wheel off, I removed the rim breaks! Maybe that's not the worst thing in the world...after all, I did get them back on...but now they rub against the rim (and I was so proud of myself to make sure they didn't rub on the tire, but only lined them up with the rim). Now I can't figure out what to do.... And I'm sure for most of you, this is nothing! DH will be home in a couple of hours and I'm hoping he can figure it out for me. Sometimes he's good at this stuff but other times he has no clue either. I'll be sooooo embarrassed if I have to go back to the shop and fess up to these guys what I did! I'm sure they already had a good laugh at me as THERE WAS NOTHING WRONG WITH THE TIRE IN THE FIRST PLACE!!!! LOL!

The question is...Where do you learn some basic bike mechanics like changing tires, adjusting brakes, etc.? I FEAR a flat in a triathlon and know I should learn how to do this. The youtube videos make changing a tire like child's play. But it's hard to follow something hard to see. And...it'd be nice to practice it, but if you don't have a flat tire...how do you do that?

I know many of you can do this in your sleep...but at one time ya'll had to learn as well...how did you learn to do it?

Thanks for the info...and go ahead and laugh...I'm still laughing!
emoticon


Leader/Co Leader of:

Beautiful Beagles Team,

lynnkirchhoff.wordpress.com/


 Pounds lost: 3.0 
 
0
6.25
12.5
18.75
25
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other TriSport:Triathletes, Swimmers, Cyclists & Runners General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
Welcome to the Team 12/11/2013 8:24:31 AM
swimming videos 12/11/2013 8:27:32 AM
Little Help here Please 11/16/2013 1:27:43 PM
Running my 1st race of 2014-15 Season 10/18/2014 7:40:13 AM
From volunteer to triathlete hopeful.... 9/19/2013 10:47:12 PM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x8x26997500

Review our Community Guidelines