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JAVAMAMA07's Photo JAVAMAMA07 Posts: 47
4/27/10 10:04 P

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I've been grinding my own wheat flours (and other flours as well) for years but have just starting soaking.

I'm just learning so this was a great topic:)

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PATTK1220's Photo PATTK1220 SparkPoints: (65,190)
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4/20/10 4:55 P

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This info from the Whole Grain Council wholegrainscouncil.org/recipes/cooki
ng
-whole-grains
might help you with soaking times. Here's a link to an interesting article on chow.com www.chow.com/stories/11819 It's unfortunate they used pearl barley as their example instead of hulled barley, though. Here's some info for that www.vegancoach.com/barley-recipes.ht
ml


If you use a 3" strip of kombu when cooking soaked dried beans, it reduces gas. I bet it would work for whole grains, too.

Edited by: PATTK1220 at: 4/21/2010 (15:23)
Patt in Minneapolis
Leader, Forks Over Knives & Engine 2 Diet
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One's philosophy is not best expressed in words; it is expressed in the choices one makes ... and the choices we make are ultimately our responsibility.- Eleanor Roosevelt

The food you eat can be either the safest & most powerful form of medicine or the slowest form of poison. ~Ann Wigmore


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WILLBOYWONDER's Photo WILLBOYWONDER SparkPoints: (33,405)
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4/6/10 5:11 P

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I save my broth from my veggies too. My grandma called it pot liquor. But it serves very well when cooking things that need vegetable broth. I will put it in a ziploc bag and sometimes I'll freeze it. It thaws quickly and can be used in so many different things.

~~ Will ~~

~~~~If you're looking for a blessing, try being a blessing to others! ~~~~


www.webmd.com/


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SKINNYROBIN100's Photo SKINNYROBIN100 Posts: 6,987
4/6/10 2:22 P

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emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon emoticon Hi mamma...I' beginning to think that there are many differences of facts out there, but that if you try to eat a variety of raw veggies as well as steamed, you can't go wrong. I alway save all my veggie waters and use them for soups and stews. And I never buy anything canned anymore. Mostly fresh with a few things frozen, like corn and green beans. But still think that when it comes to ways of cooking for optimum nutrition that lightly cooked is best no matter the method. I'll bet even grilling is good on some level. I do know that cooked tomatos are best for lycopen, but I eat them lots both raw and cooked!! Can't go wrong there. This has been very interesting conversation and I hope that anyone else out there will add what they think too! emoticon emoticon

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RUNDARCYRUN's Photo RUNDARCYRUN Posts: 2,837
4/6/10 4:43 A

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Thanks for the article! That is so interesting - it says the opposite of the article I had read... which I still can't find, but I am still looking. The article in the shape magazine also said that microwaving helped retain the vitamins, but I do not use a microwave at all, and avoid it at all costs.

Here is another interesting fact from the article I read - it said that some vegetables in the study actually showed MORE nutrient/vitamin content AFTER being cooked, the 2 on the top of that list were carrots and celery. I cook a chicken soup/stock every week with lots of carrots and celery and would love to see the nutritional content of that! =)

Here is more info from a website I found too -

"Studies suggest that many people may be eating fruits and vegetables that are seriously lacking in vitamins and antioxidants. A test done at one of Spain's major research centers measured the levels of flavonoids (a kind of antioxidant) that remained in fresh broccoli after it was cooked by four popular methods--steaming, pressure cooking, boiling or microwaving.

The authors looked at both the total flavonoid content as well as several derivatives in the edible portion of freshly harvested broccoli. The results, they said, "showed large differences among the four treatments in their influence on flavonoid content in broccoli." Conventional boiling led to a 66 percent loss of flavonoids compared to fresh raw broccoli. And pressure cooking was not much better, with 47 percent of one of the major antioxidants left after cooking (the majority of it was found in the cooking water, which is usually tossed down the drain.) There was a major disadvantage detected when broccoli was microwaved. The loss of flavonoids with that method was an incredible 97 percent! Steaming is your best option."
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Nutrition-Die
ting-939/Microwave-pressure-cooking.htm

This one reports that microwaving was by far the worst on the broccoli, and pressure cooking was a bit better than boiling. I find it interesting that the nutrients that were "lost" from the broccoli was found in the water, though! I don't toss my water when I cook my veggies. I use very little water and let it evaporate. I wonder if that helps.

Anyway, I think all this info is quite interesting. And I think it is good to get info from different sources, so thanks for sharing what you found!

**Darcy**

My PRs:
5K Run: 22:55 (non-race)
10K Run: 46:16
Half Marathon: 1:43:12
30K: 2:43:54
Marathon: 3:47:44


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SKINNYROBIN100's Photo SKINNYROBIN100 Posts: 6,987
4/6/10 12:36 A

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This is one item I just found! Thursday, May 22, 2008
Pressure Cook for More Nutrition
One of the main reasons to use a pressure cooker is because it's so fast but it also makes your food more nutritious. The quick cooking time helps retain nutrients.

The following is from a New York Times story titled , Finding the Best Way to Cook All Those Vegetables
('http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/20/heal
th/nutrition/20well.html');
}
By TARA PARKER-POPE
Published: May 20, 2008:

That report did not look at the effects of microwaving, but a March 2007 study in The Journal of Food Science looked at the effects of boiling, steaming, microwaving and pressure cooking on the nutrients in broccoli. Steaming and boiling caused a 22 percent to 34 percent loss of vitamin C. Microwaved and pressure-cooked vegetables retained 90 percent of their vitamin C.

Now, that's impressive. The article also had other information that I liked reading, one tidbit stating that including avocadoes with your salad will help you absorb more nutrients. Since I really like avocado, that's good news.

Edited by: SKINNYROBIN100 at: 4/6/2010 (00:37)
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SKINNYROBIN100's Photo SKINNYROBIN100 Posts: 6,987
4/5/10 10:26 P

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Hi...thanks for looking. I hope you and your family had a nice Easter holiday!! I'll try to research this some on my own too and I'll get back to you with what I find.

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RUNDARCYRUN's Photo RUNDARCYRUN Posts: 2,837
4/5/10 7:02 A

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Hey, the skinny!
Well, I was trying to find some definite info for you. The most recent info I read was from a study covered in a Shape magazine article, but I haven't found the exact issue yet. It detailed a study recently done specifically analyzing nutrient content before and after different cooking methods, also with different vegetables and such. Boiling and pressure cooking were determined the most detrimental to the nutrient content of the foods. I know I've read it from other sources too, but can't pinpoint those at the moment.

I know there are so many different opinions out there. My mother also is a big pressure cooker user! I think a person just has to do the best to make their own research and decide for themselves what's best.

If I come across some other info, I'll try and let you know.

**Darcy**

My PRs:
5K Run: 22:55 (non-race)
10K Run: 46:16
Half Marathon: 1:43:12
30K: 2:43:54
Marathon: 3:47:44


 Pounds lost: 46.4 
 
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SKINNYROBIN100's Photo SKINNYROBIN100 Posts: 6,987
4/2/10 10:41 P

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Wow...Monkey mama, I would definately be interested in reading the info you've read about the nutrient content in pressure cooked foods. My grandmother and mother always used one for all kinds of things and I use one for corn on the cob and summer squashes. I thought that this way of cooking kept the vitamins INSIDE better, not less!!

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RUNDARCYRUN's Photo RUNDARCYRUN Posts: 2,837
4/2/10 8:25 A

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Willboywonder -
Thanks for the article and info. BTW, Sally Fallon is the founder and director of the Weston A. Price Foundation... maybe that rings a bell.

The real reason for my question has to do with preparation and cooking methods to make everything as nutritious and easy to digest as possible.

I am actually a long-distance runner, and I am having a bit of GI problems, which I have found is quite common for long-distance runners. Studies have shown that whole-grains and lactose are 2 of the main culprits in intensifying the problem. Whole grains, beans, and some high-fiber vegetables have a hard-to-digest fiber (which is why they cause gas), and when you throw intense long runs into the mix... well, lets just say its not a good combination!

According to Sally Fallon and other whole-food diet sources I have read from, soaking your flour and other grains in yogurt or whey (there may be other things that are good to use in the soaking process as well!) help break down that fiber, making it easier on the digestive system. Plus, I have also read that there are nutrient inhibitors naturally in whole grains and some vegetables, that the cooking process does not break down, that make it harder for your body to absorb all the nutrients from the food. Soaking is also supposed to break these inhibitors down, making the nutrients more readily available to your body.

Ok, so now that I have gone through all that to explain my question, I was just trying to see how other people might make their own bread, or pancakes, or rice, or whatever, with these things in mind... =)

**Darcy**

My PRs:
5K Run: 22:55 (non-race)
10K Run: 46:16
Half Marathon: 1:43:12
30K: 2:43:54
Marathon: 3:47:44


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RUNDARCYRUN's Photo RUNDARCYRUN Posts: 2,837
4/2/10 8:20 A

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TheSkinny-
Thanks for your reply! Actually I have read and heard from several different sources that pressure cooking is one of the worst ways to cook your foods nutritionally. In a recent study I read about, it ranked one of the highest as a cooking method that takes the most nutrients out of your food. I personally wouldn't use it at all to cook my things, but to each their own... I just try to keep things as nutrient rich as possible...



**Darcy**

My PRs:
5K Run: 22:55 (non-race)
10K Run: 46:16
Half Marathon: 1:43:12
30K: 2:43:54
Marathon: 3:47:44


 Pounds lost: 46.4 
 
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SKINNYROBIN100's Photo SKINNYROBIN100 Posts: 6,987
4/1/10 11:44 P

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I use a pressure cooker after I soak my beans, ect.. and they cook in less than jhalf the time and are so yummy!!

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WILLBOYWONDER's Photo WILLBOYWONDER SparkPoints: (33,405)
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4/1/10 12:01 P

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I just saw this Sparkpeople.com article on cooking grains that may be of interest to you:
www.sparkpeople.com/resource/nutriti
on
_articles.asp?id=1025


~~ Will ~~

~~~~If you're looking for a blessing, try being a blessing to others! ~~~~


www.webmd.com/


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WILLBOYWONDER's Photo WILLBOYWONDER SparkPoints: (33,405)
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3/12/10 11:22 A

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I am not familiar with Sally Fallon. This is based on my own experiences.

Soaking is good to help in digesting the grains (i.e., barley, couscous, long grain or brown rice, quinoa, millet, etc.) and to help it cook a little faster. I use the same method for soaking grains that I use for beans and lentils. There are many ways but I think the best way to soak grains is overnight, or for about 8 hours. Put your grains in a pot and add enough water to completely cover the grains. Add in a 1/2 teaspoon of olive oil and a teaspoon of lemon juice. Mix together well and cover during the soaking process. After the time has lapsed, you can add your desired seasonings and begin cooking.

If you need to use the expedited method of soaking, then place the grains in your pot, cover with water, and add the olive oil and lemon juice as indicated above and cover. Do not remove lid until you’re ready to begin cooking. Bring to a boil. Once it begins boiling, remove from heat and let sit for 2 hours. After 2 hours, you can add your desired seasonings and begin cooking.

I don't have info on the bread or the soaking of flour. Maybe you can modify this to suit your situation.

Good luck and I hope this helps.

Edited by: WILLBOYWONDER at: 3/12/2010 (11:56)
~~ Will ~~

~~~~If you're looking for a blessing, try being a blessing to others! ~~~~


www.webmd.com/


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RUNDARCYRUN's Photo RUNDARCYRUN Posts: 2,837
3/12/10 2:40 A

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Does anyone know anything about soaking grains to make them easier to digest? I am not a vegetarian, but I follow much of Sally Fallon's diet suggestions, except that I have not been soaking my flours. I eat lots of vegetables, and believe that everything should be organic if possible, and processed as little as possible, and I cook everything from scratch.

Can anyone tell me the exact process for soaking your grains? I do not have her book "Nourishing Traditions," I only have "Eat Fat, Lose Fat." How much whey or yogurt for how much flour... and so on. How does soaking flour effect the recipes? Does anyone have any good bread recipes? I think Sally Fallon says that bread should either be sprouted grain or sour dough. How can I make that from home?

I am currently making my own whole-grain bread, either wheat or spelt, but I want to make it even more nutritious if possible. Buying that sort of bread is just outrageously expensive.



**Darcy**

My PRs:
5K Run: 22:55 (non-race)
10K Run: 46:16
Half Marathon: 1:43:12
30K: 2:43:54
Marathon: 3:47:44


 Pounds lost: 46.4 
 
0
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