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ETAGGEL's Photo ETAGGEL SparkPoints: (88,552)
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7/27/08 4:44 P

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I am not going to enter into all the scientific evidence but I do know that since joining SP I feel a whole lot healthier in mind and body.

Phyllis

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Leader of The SP Class 0f June 14-20,2009
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If you can imagine it, you can achieve it; if you can dream it, you can become it.
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PATRICIAAK's Photo PATRICIAAK SparkPoints: (236,015)
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7/19/08 6:00 A

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interesting.

Have a TERRIFIC day!
Patricia
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L*I*T*A*'s Photo L*I*T*A* SparkPoints: (358,944)
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7/16/08 10:31 P

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another great article..........thanks


“There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses; only results.”

When you get to a plateau, think of it as a landing on the stairway to your goal. And maintenance is a lifelong plateau, so a bit of "rehearsal" for maintenance isn't the worst thing in the world

pacific time


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WONKGRRRL's Photo WONKGRRRL Posts: 214
7/15/08 11:08 P

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Yeah, it's tricky enough trying to guess what the reasonable balance is for adults between (a) getting enough of a given nutrient, (b) making sure you don't get too much, and (c) not throwing your $ away needlessly. My understanding is that the risk of (b), toxic levels, is greatest w/the fat soluble nutrients (e.g., A, D, E) and relatively small for the water soluble stuff like B's, C... But there's probably a lot of individual variation, esp. with regard to liver and kidney function and allergies. For example, I recently read a post of someone having a bad reaction to niacin(?), which was being taken to boost "good" cholesterol (LDL).

Anyway, for my kids, I'm gonna probably do something like buy some Flinstone vitamins + minerals and mix ground flaxseed in their yogurt, esp. since they're vegetarians and wouldn't get Omega-3 through fish. That ought to cover the bases in the article: "Omega-3 acids combined with iron, zinc, folic acid and other vitamins have been demonstrated to improve verbal intelligence, learning and memory test scores after six months when given to children between the ages of 6 and 12."


Fall down seven times, get up eight. - Japanese proverb

Progress has little to do with speed, but much to do with direction. -SpaceMonkey's Spark Page

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MORTICIAADDAMS's Photo MORTICIAADDAMS Posts: 66,613
7/15/08 11:05 P

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I sucked down enough blueberries on Sunday to sink a battleship but I probably still need to break out the salmon just to be sure. LOL.

-American consumers have no problem with carcinogens, but they will not purchase any product, including floor wax, that has fat in it. - Dave Barry
-My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four; unless there are three other people. - Orson Welles
-The food here is terrible, and the portions are too small. - Woody Allen

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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,827
7/15/08 9:38 P

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I would think the ideal would be through eating foods that contain these substances...rather than supplements, but that's just my sentiment, no real "knowledge" per se...

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

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WONKGRRRL's Photo WONKGRRRL Posts: 214
7/15/08 9:19 P

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Thanks, Don! This is great info. A friend from work and I recently stocked up on Omega 3, zinc, selenium, & B supplements, and we were wondering what would be appropriate for our kids.

Fall down seven times, get up eight. - Japanese proverb

Progress has little to do with speed, but much to do with direction. -SpaceMonkey's Spark Page

You cannot do all the good the world needs, but the world needs all the good you can do. - Jana Stanfield

The more I move, the more alive I feel TODAY. - Me


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DDOORN's Photo DDOORN Posts: 23,827
7/15/08 9:08 P

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In the July, 2008 issue of the journal Nature Reviews Neuroscience, UCLA professor of neurosurgery and physiological science Fernando Gómez-Pinilla summarizes the latest findings concerning the effects of various foods on the brain, noting that some foods have a drug-like effect. "Food is like a pharmaceutical compound that affects the brain," Dr Gómez-Pinilla stated.

"Diet, exercise and sleep have the potential to alter our brain health and mental function. This raises the exciting possibility that changes in diet are a viable strategy for enhancing cognitive abilities, protecting the brain from damage and counteracting the effects of aging."

In an analysis of over 160 studies, omega-3 fatty acids (EPA, DHA, and ALA) emerged as significant dietary compounds to enhance learning and memory, and prevent mental disorders. "Omega-3 fatty acids are essential for normal brain function,” Dr Gómez-Pinilla observed. “Dietary deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids in humans has been associated with increased risk of several mental disorders, including attention-deficit disorder, dyslexia, dementia, depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. A deficiency of omega-3 fatty acids in rodents results in impaired learning and memory."

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are needed for the formation of brain cell membranes, which develop connections called synapses that are important in learning. "Omega-3 fatty acids support synaptic plasticity and seem to positively affect the expression of several molecules related to learning and memory that are found on synapses," Dr Gómez-Pinilla explained.

Dr Gómez-Pinilla noted that increasing the omega-3 fatty acid levels of children’s diets improved school performance and reduced behavioral problems. Omega-3 acids combined with iron, zinc, folic acid and other vitamins have been demonstrated to improve verbal intelligence, learning and memory test scores after six months when given to children between the ages of 6 and 12.

Other research has shown that the nutritional content of one’s diet can have effects on the health, including neurological function, of one’s descendants. "Evidence indicates that what you eat can affect your grandchildren's brain molecules and synapses,” Dr Gómez-Pinilla commented. “We are trying to find the molecular basis to explain this."

He additionally observed that reducing the amount of food we eat can be beneficial. Consuming too many calories can decrease the flexibility of the brain cells’ synapses and increase free radical damage. Although the brain is very susceptible to this damage, foods such as blueberries can help counteract it.

Another important brain nutrient is the B vitamin folic acid. Insufficient folic acid has been linked with depression and cognitive impairment, and supplementation with the vitamin has been demonstrated to be helpful in the prevention of cognitive decline and dementia. Folic acid has also been shown to enhance the effects of antidepressants.

In depressed as well as schizophrenic individuals, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a signaling molecule, is reduced. Omega-3 fatty acids as well as curcumin, a compound that occurs in the spice turmeric, can help elevate BDNF in a manner similar to antidepressant or antischizophrenic drugs. "BDNF is reduced in the hippocampus, in various cortical areas and in the serum of patients with schizophrenia," Dr Gómez-Pinilla stated. "BDNF levels are reduced in the plasma of patients with major depression."

“Understanding the molecular basis of the effects of food on cognition will help us to determine how best to manipulate diet in order to increase the resistance of neurons to insults and promote mental fitness,” Dr Gómez-Pinilla concluded.

www.lef.org/newsletter/2008/0715_Bra
in
-Food.htm


Mild cognitive impairment

The best strategy for treating mild cognitive impairment is to avoid it in the first place. This means getting plenty of exercise and good sleep, eating a healthy diet, keeping body weight down, avoiding diabetes, and taking the right nutritional supplements before you experience any signs of cognitive decline.

In one prospective study, more than 500 participants age 55 or older without clinical symptoms of dementia were evaluated. Their diets were assessed at the onset of the study, and participants were screened for symptoms of dementia an average of two years later. After adjusting for other factors, participants with the highest total fat intake were found to have a significantly elevated relative risk of dementia. An increased risk of dementia was also associated with a high dietary intake of saturated fat and cholesterol. On the other hand, a high intake of fish was associated with a significantly lower risk of dementia (Kalmijn V et al 1997). These findings have been supported in several other studies (Solfrizzi V et al 2005; Solfrizzi V et al 2003; Solfrizzi V et al 1999; Panza F et al 2004; Capurso A et al 2000).

Free radicals are highly unstable molecules that react with other molecules in a damaging process known as oxidation. Areas of the body with high energy output, such as the brain, are particularly vulnerable to damage from free radicals. The body normally defends itself against the harmful effects of free radicals with antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as vitamins C and E. Animal studies have suggested that diets high in antioxidants can delay age-related memory loss (Joseph JA et al 1998; Perrig WJ et al 1997).

www.lef.org/protocols/neurological/m
il
d_cognitive_impairment_01.htm


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Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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