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MTNMOMMA3's Photo MTNMOMMA3 Posts: 67
1/22/13 8:08 A

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I have been considering Teaching Textbooks because it is taught and practiced on the computer. They have a 30 day trial but I borrowed a friend's copy and was impressed. The only reason I haven't jumped on it is we are part way through RightStart Math (which also has limited worksheets) and I still "believe" in the RS Math philosophy so I'm trying to get through the school year with it.

Christie, mom to three little guys-- 7, 5, 3 yrs.


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7/17/11 12:18 P

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Thanks for the advice. I will have to try those out. He loves to be on the computer so the games might work. He also has a competitive streak so the tickets would probably work too, if I make it a game to "win" the tickets.

2 Cor. 5:17 Therefore in any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.


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7/15/11 9:29 P

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When my son was younger another thing I thing that I had some success with was to get some of those carnival type tickets (I found a big roll at Wal-Mart for a couple of dollars) and each time he completed (satisfactorily, of course) a lesson in a subject he didn't like, he would get a ticket. I had a drawer with little presents (gum, little toys, packets of sports cards, inexpensive little things I knew he'd like) that he could redeem for the prizes. It's not something a lot would think was a great idea (I had a mom say love of learning should be reward enough, but the way I see it, kids that young don't have the capacity to rationalize that ... so I used what worked ... my son is in his high school years of homeschooling now, and it didn't damage him any :) )

Other prizes to be earned were things like coupons for computer time, trip to the library, a pass on doing a chore, things like that.

Some times a little extra motivation can make an unliked subject more appealling.

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7/15/11 7:49 P

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Does your son have a special interest, favorite character/cartoon, sport, or hobby? If he does, it may work if you try to connect math to one of those topics. What made me think of this was my son was sorting through baseball cards, that he bought at a yard sale, and some of them were flashcards -- on the one side it would have a times table, and on the reverse there was a baseball player, and the number on the jersey was the answer - I thought how cute and how great that would be to motivate a baseball fan :) Something like that may work for your son (catered to his interests of course).

If he likes pretending, he may like using monopoly money and maybe an old check register to "balance" a checkbook (fitting with his lessons). When my son was younger he enjoyed setting up a store like that and pretending he was running a business.

Does he like games? If he does, and also can be online, there are some fun math sites for kids, I will post back when I find the links (and our kitten stops pouncing on the keyboard :) :) )

~~~~~~~~~
edited to add:

Okay, kitty is distracted for a moment :) Here is a link to a site that has interactive games for math and language arts. This goes right to the 5th grade page, but they have other grades as well. http://www.internet4classrooms.com/skills_
5th_original.htm

I hope this helps ~ I figured there may be a chance that games may work, most kids love games (I know that was (and still is) a huge appeal for my son).

Also, something else that worked and still works for my son (at high school level now) is to add a subject he loves (like history) with one he doesn't care much for (like language arts) is to add them together - if your son likes history, you could try to incorporate math in to that (such as when so and so discovered this land it was {insert year} - he was born {insert year} so how old did that make him? Different things like that. It may be tough to tie things in to a subject he enjoys, but it may get him more interested in math.

Edited by: MANGOTANGERINE at: 7/15/2011 (20:05)
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Goal ~ Disney Princess Half Marathon 2012 ~


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7/15/11 7:13 A

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I have a question about math. I have one kid that loves workbooks and the worksheets. He has no problem sitting down and working. I have another that will do them, likes some of them. The third (starting 5th grade) HATES math. I have tried everything from workbooks to real life applications like measure the hall way or if 1 thing cost $2 how much is 8 going to cost. He still hates math. I was wondering if there is any tricks to help him. Sometimes it is a real battle to get him to do his work. He will do everything else that we ask of him, so I don't know what's up. Any help is very much appreciated. Thanks!

2 Cor. 5:17 Therefore in any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new.


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