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QUIDAGISAMICUS's Photo QUIDAGISAMICUS Posts: 10
7/24/08 5:52 P

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Those are great ideas! You might also want to try making words activities or words sorts. Making words is nice because once you teach the kids how to do cut the letters up and move them around to create new words, you can change the "mystery word" as often as you would like or you can offer choices of easier and more difficult mystery words. They enjoy trying to outdo each other with the number of words they can make from the mystery word letters and they think they have outwitted me when the put all the letters together and figure out my mystery word. I also like word sorts because they can be as easy or difficult as you would like and the students really use some higher level thinking skills to determine how the words are similar and different. I usually have the kids cut and paste the words into a notebook to keep and label the categories at the top of the page. Hope this is helpful.

All our dreams can come true if we have the courage to persue them
-Walt Disney


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SAMODER's Photo SAMODER Posts: 11,838
7/23/08 10:24 P

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I love that book - She has one for students with difficulties too

Sam

You don't stop laughing. because you grow old, you grow old. because you stop laughing!


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GERRI157's Photo GERRI157 Posts: 18
7/23/08 1:21 P

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Hello, I found a good book, "Teaching Gifted Kids in the Regular Classroom" by Susan Winebrenner. For centers and reading ideas, I like all of the Fountas and Pinnell books. Do an inventory on the students. Also teach the child not the content. If you have to teach to the curriculum, then use the inventory to drive the classroom. Pretesting, differentiation and compacting works for students at any age. It all seems technical but its important for you to learn the world of G&T. I am sure you will be a great teacher,look how far you have come. I teach a self contained 6th grade g&t class. I have to teach all the subjects- all day! In the past, I have taught third and fifth grade. DO NOT LOOK FOR PERFECTION, they are CHILDREN. THEY DO NOT KNOW EVERYTHING. Start small and remember you have the degree!God bless emoticon

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HEALTHYKIDS2 Posts: 98
7/23/08 9:11 A

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WOW! These are all great ideas. I am going to get started on them this week. Thank you all for your support. I now have another challenge to create work for them to take back to their regular classroom teachers to work on when they finish early! I will probably do some writing / making book activities with foldables for this. I also attended a workshop this week about writing trait centers which will work great too!

Thanks again for all of your ideas!

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ADAMSA15's Photo ADAMSA15 Posts: 296
7/22/08 11:07 P

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Great ideas!

I teach middle school, but my daughter was in first grade last year, and was part of an advanced reader group. Her teacher did genre studies with the group, which she ran lit. circle style. For example, They did biographies, learned all about what they were, each student read a biography of choice, and then they gave a mini-report to the group on their person. They studied poetry and did anthologies of their own and favorite poems. They also have reading buddies with older students from another classroom that kind of act as a mentor. She loves reading now!

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TEACHERMOM10's Photo TEACHERMOM10 Posts: 1,416
7/22/08 9:59 P

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I absolutely LOVE these ideas!!! I teach in a Primary Years IB school and I am always looking for creative open-ended ideas for my students. I will begin working on developing these stations ASAP. Thanks SO much! I can't wait to see the students working in these centers.
emoticon

Be tolerant of the human race. Your whole family belongs to it -- and some of your spouse's family does too.

-- Anonymous

Most people are more comfortable with old problems than with new solutions.

-- Anonymous


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ANNETTE_LEE's Photo ANNETTE_LEE Posts: 541
7/22/08 9:50 P

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Hello! Just a quick intro about my job (I am going into my final year of education, but I work at the university part-time)... I work at the Headquarters of the World Council for Gifted and Talented Children (www.world-gifted.org) and I have access to loads of resources. You can visit my website and contact me (via SparkPeople) if you'd like some more detailed information about literacy for gifted readers.

Here's a few ideas for literacy centres (taken from H. Katz... a former professor at my university):
1. A Restaurant Centre can include a tablecloth, dishes, glasses (plastic), cutlery (plastic), napkins, menus, trays, order pad and pencil, and apron and vest for waiters or waitresses. Children play at being patrons and servers, reading menus and writing orders.
2. Outfit a Travel Centre with travel posters,
brochures, maps, tickets, wallet with play money and "credit cards", cash box, and suitcase. Children take the role of agent and customer and organize trips using the print material listed above.
3. A Veterinarian's Office filled with stuffed animals, medical bag, medicine bottles, facsimile prescription labels, posters of different dogs, cats, and so on, with names attached. Children take roles of vet and animal owner, discuss pet problems, and read posters and labels to help animal become healthy.
4. A Banking Centre can be set up with passbooks, cheques, play money, deposit slips, signs, ads, and receipts. The child plays at depositing and withdrawing money, setting up accounts, and buying securities. All of these activities involve writing in different forms relevant to everyday life.
5. A Supermarket Centre with food packets and boxes, plastic fruit and artificial food, price stickers, play money, grocery bags, marking pens, ads, and coupons. Children buy food (be sure to include healthy alternatives among your boxes), tally costs, and check out and pay.
6. A centre with interesting potential for learning about writing techniques is the Illustration Centre. Children's and young adolescent's literature is a cornucopia of variously and beautifully illustrated stories (Look for groups of books illustrated by Eric Carle, Leo Leoni, or Ed Young, among others). An illustration centre helps gifted young readers explore the way book illustrations are created and how they function to enhance (and sometimes detract from) texts. Make sure that there are enough colored pencils, markers, watercolour paints, charcoals, crayons, pieces of paper, and copies of different, and differently illustrated stories to encourage children to get involved in this centre. With this material, children explore the effectiveness and use of different media. First, the child copies styles or subjects. Later, the gifted child probes and explores, extending styles or media and creating sequels to books on hand.

Now, all these centres take time and materials to set up, but once in place, can be very effective to challenge a gifted reader, or any child for that matter!

Edited by: ANNETTE_LEE at: 7/22/2008 (21:57)
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WANNAB125's Photo WANNAB125 Posts: 381
7/22/08 9:30 P

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I teach high school algebra. Sometimes, the grass seems greener on the other side of the fence. I know that it was pre-K/early childhood classes that drew me back into education. I quit my middle school math teaching job very burned out and eventually substitute taught at a local school. I had so much fun with the younger kids; I wanted to go back and teach. These kids made me feel so much better about myself. Think of it that way...........you have kids that still really WANT to learn. They raise up their hands and want to answer questions and get upset if you don't pick them. I love the enthusiasm of kids at that age. I believe in you. You CAN do it!

Teach


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KSJKNITWIT's Photo KSJKNITWIT Posts: 1,111
7/22/08 7:08 P

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How about doing literature circles? See the link below: http://www.litcircles.org/

Kathy Sue


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TEACHERMOM10's Photo TEACHERMOM10 Posts: 1,416
7/22/08 7:05 P

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An idea from Debbie Diller's Literacy Work Stations: Making Centers Work(One that I have yet to implement-but love!)is creating a puppet stage where students (or you) create miniature puppets to correspond with the characters from the books they are currently reading. Students working in pairs take turns - one reads aloud while the other student acts out the story thru puppetry. This helps build reading fluency and helps strengthen comprehension as well as listening skills. Plus it just sounds like so much fun.
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Here is a link to one small tabletop puppet stage:http://www.highlights.com/jump.jsp?i
temID=2583&itemType=PRODUCT&ccid=OTC-1
114-1000524&sccat=E0911&source=nextag

Be tolerant of the human race. Your whole family belongs to it -- and some of your spouse's family does too.

-- Anonymous

Most people are more comfortable with old problems than with new solutions.

-- Anonymous


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SAMODER's Photo SAMODER Posts: 11,838
7/22/08 6:37 P

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One of the ideas I got from a class is to create a cube that has activities on it. The student goes to the center & rolls the cube for an activity. You can change them depending on what you're studying.

What about genre studies? Each center could be a different genre. Make your "cubes" specific to a genre. Then trade out the books however often you need.

Hope this helps.



You don't stop laughing. because you grow old, you grow old. because you stop laughing!


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TRIXIERACER's Photo TRIXIERACER Posts: 512
7/22/08 5:13 P

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My absolute favorite center that I have to have every year is a listening corner. Pick books that are at a level where they can follow along with the reading, but wouldn't be able to read independently, especially chapter books, where the students can listen to one chapter a day and then (if they're at a high enough writing level) have the students write along a prompt, such as
1. what do you think will happen next?
2. who is your favorite character and why?
3. what would you do if...?
Their answers are really interesting.

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HEALTHYKIDS2 Posts: 98
7/22/08 4:42 P

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Last year I started teaching a gifted and talented reading group. I will have up to 30 students for 45 minutes while the other first graders are receiving reading intervention services from the other teachers. I am not sure what my parent help will look like this year, so I am not planning on this at all. I know centers is the only way to manage this many kids, but I am struggling with ideas. Last year my group varied from 30 wpm to 136 wpm. This year will looks like it will be the same. I have done a fairy tale and a poetry unit, as well as the Read Naturally program for fluency. Any other good center ideas that don't take hours to create and can be used over and over without getting boring?

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