Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
CATHYSFITLIFE's Photo CATHYSFITLIFE Posts: 13,488
6/5/13 8:47 A

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
emoticon They have just recently made a new supercomputer called a quantum computer. It's capabilities are far beyond any supercomputer until now. There are a couple of companies that actually own one. If some of these Universities that do medical research end up owning one, we could up solving so many medical problems in our lifetime. The possibilities are nearly endless!

Cathy (Central Time Zone)
A&I BSG July Spirited Swimmers

Aspire & Inspire team co-leader
www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=31050


 current weight: 120.6 
 
162
145.25
128.5
111.75
95
PHEBESS's Photo PHEBESS Posts: 36,523
5/31/13 8:34 A

Community Team Member

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Wow - the science of both the disease and the potential cure is just amazing, isn't it?

Hope they figure this one out - it sounds good!

"Dance as if no one is watching."


 Pounds lost: 45.0 
 
0
21.25
42.5
63.75
85
TWEETYKC00's Photo TWEETYKC00 Posts: 104,753
5/30/13 4:46 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Can you imagine the possibilities from this? I hope they find something from this that can help everyone.

 Pounds lost: 104.7 
 
0
30
60
90
120
SEASONS_CHANGE_'s Photo SEASONS_CHANGE_ Posts: 5,955
5/30/13 11:17 A

Send Private Message
Reply
from poz.com

May 29, 2013

Supercomputer Helps Define HIV Capsid Structure

For the first time, scientists have identified the precise atomic structure of the HIV capsid, which is the container of viral genes the virus inserts into human immune cells. This discovery, which was aided by the massively powerful Blue Waters supercomputer at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, may help in the development of new HIV therapies that would attack the capsid. Since this would be a novel approach to fighting HIV, such therapies would hold the promise of being effective for those who are resistant to other classes of drugs. The findings made the cover of the May 30 issue of the journal Nature.

After using Blue Waters’ computational power to aid in defining the atomic structure of the capsid, the University of Illinois teams ran a simulation through the computer of how the capsid would behave in organic situations. According to investigator Klaus Schulten, a physics professor at the university, the supercomputer is 20 to 50 times more powerful in its computational abilities than the computer his team relied upon only a year before. Such power was necessary to help understand the relatively large capsid, which is composed of some 3 million protein atoms.

These findings and the capacity of Blue Waters have opened the door for drug developers to better understand how their agents are interacting with the capsid, so they can tailor the drug molecules accordingly. The Illinois research team will next pursue such drug therapies in their simulations.

www.poz.com/articles/Blue_Waters_761
_2
3984.shtml


"How far that little candle throws its beams! So shines a good deed in a naughty world."
~William Shakespeare


Kelly



Total SparkPoints: 98,561
 
80,000
84,999
89,999
94,999
99,999
SparkPoints Level 19
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other Positive Positives HIV / AIDS and Our Supporters General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
What Preventing HIV in Babies Can Tell Us About Pr 7/19/2015 12:57:23 PM
9.29: I'm back 10/1/2015 10:39:13 PM
Just Started Treatment; Why Is My CD4% Down? 3/1/2016 5:28:21 PM
Spark Changes Update 8/29/2015 5:40:26 PM
HIV Co-Discoverer Calls for New Approach to Cure R 10/1/2015 10:37:36 PM



Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x37262x53534844

Review our Community Guidelines


x Lose 10 Pounds by September 6! Sign up with Email Sign up with Facebook
By clicking one of the above buttons, you're indicating that you have read and agree to SparkPeople's Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy and that you're at least 18 years of age.