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RABIES1965's Photo RABIES1965 Posts: 65
2/12/13 12:14 A

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Oh, and I've been playing kayak polo in the off-season...such a great workout. Especially the no-rules form, where we grapple over the ball, pull spray decks, push each other over and generally create mayhem. emoticon

Exercise should be about rewarding yourself with strength and endorphins, not punishing yourself for what you have eaten.
-- something uncredited that I read on Facebook


 current weight: 12.1  over
 
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RABIES1965's Photo RABIES1965 Posts: 65
2/12/13 12:05 A

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Hey all--yup, everything 44 wrote! One good thing about camping trips in general is that there's plenty of time spent in camp, so cooking healthy meals is very do-able. Some of us try to divide up the meal-making, which works when people are on-board with the healthy eating lifestyle, and you get to know who they are pretty quickly. I try to bring fresh veggies that don't need refrigeration: zucchini or greens that I pan fry in a little bit of olive oil, and add herbs (which travel well in old film canisters), onions & peppers to add to canned tomatoes/sauce, frozen chicken breasts, which act like icepacks while they thaw--and cook them up on the second day as fajitas.

My favorite breakfast is oatmeal with whey powder added, along with fruit, nuts and flaxseed. It's pretty good at keeping me full until past-midday--I don't really like to eat a lot while on the river (tuna snack packs if we stop for lunch, or carefully selected energy/granola bars) because I get a little nauseous if I eat too much while doing physical activity, and if I swim, I don't want to have too full a stomache. Oh, and I don't drink as much water as I should, because it's such a pain in the tuckus to go pee when you're in a drysuit (and I don't have a bum zipper)! So of course by the time you get off the river I'm staaaaarving. That's when I guzzle my water, which slows me down on the post-paddle beers.

I also put out an open invitation for anyone in camp to go for a run with me, usually on the Saturday morning of the weekend, try to go out walking in the evenings, and carry my boat to portage instead of dragging it (and a 50 lb creekboat with gear is a pretty good workout)!

Around the campfire, I make up a thermos of herbal tea, and sip on that instead of drinking (and bring lite beer when I do).

Exercise should be about rewarding yourself with strength and endorphins, not punishing yourself for what you have eaten.
-- something uncredited that I read on Facebook


 current weight: 12.1  over
 
15
7.5
0
-7.5
-15
4A-HEALTHY-BMI's Photo 4A-HEALTHY-BMI Posts: 5,930
1/4/13 9:55 A

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RABIES1965 commented on my page that she too is a whitewater kayaker and also struggles with the long drives, the ubiquitous post-river beers, etc. She asked what I do to manage all that and still maintain.

I'm going to start by saying it isn't easy. Unlike sea kayaking, white water is by definition social because you simply cannot do it alone safely, ever, except perhaps at a park-and-play spot or on a designated slalom course where there are onlookers, and even that is risky.

There are generally lots of food and beer temptations because white water paddlers are generous and friendly and social by nature. And driving to even GET to the rivers involves a lot of time sitting in a car, not exercising.

So for me, white water is a REASON to be in shape, not a WAY to be in shape.

I once wrote a blog post just about how I handle food on kayaking trips:
www.sparkpeople.com/mypage_public_jo
ur
nal_individual.asp?blog_id=4967550


I also eat as carefully as I can during the week and during the off-season, creating a deficit to offset those expected overages.

I train hard during the week so I'll be in strong physical condition for the weekend. This includes a mixture of heavy weight lifting (New Rules of Lifting for Women), high intensity interval training for conditioning (spin class), and flexibility work (yoga).

Given where I came from (336 lbs), my age (late 40s), the fact that I am a relative newbie to the sport (I just finished my second season), and I'm female (less upper body strength than my buddies), I need to work extra hard to make sure I can pull my own weight on and off the river. I take the approach of an athlete, because I feel like that is going to give me the best possible foundation for building my skills on the river.

Comments, suggestions, etc. are welcome!



Never, ever, EVER give up!

From BMI 53 (336 lbs) to under 30. Now aiming for less than 20% body fat.

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Goal 155 +/- 3%


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