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  FORUM:   General Team Discussion Forum
TOPIC:   Oh No...Not Shrimp TOO! 


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DDOORN
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1/31/10 9:29 P

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This is yet another example of Michael Pollan's advice to eat food one *knows*...where it is grown locally in ways that are open, transparent and readily transported nearby with a low carbon footprint.

I.e. to eat what you "know!" If one has too many unknowns about how a food product comes to your table...be suspicious, ask questions, be aware...!

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

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ADAPTABLE_ELLEN
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1/31/10 3:50 P

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I'm still depressed over the last articles, and now this!!! Arghhh!!!!

Remember, nobody can go back to the very beginning and make a brand new start, but anyone can start here and make a brand new end.

There's a difference between interest and commitment. When you're interested in doing something, you do it only when it's convenient. When you're committed to something, you accept no excuses; only results."

Ellen


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DDOORN
DDOORN's Photo Posts: 23,073
1/31/10 10:36 A

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Heartily seconded and thirded!

VERY well said!

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

rules4humans.com


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MICHLUVSBOSTON
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1/31/10 10:26 A

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Right, I had NO idea about this shrimp thing...and I wonder if you go to whole foods or a similar market if they even know.

I was talking to a friend who is a breast cancer survivor 4 years(she was doing the Koman race for the cure Friday) she was saying how sad it is because of how it was effecting so many at a younger and younger age. I said, well the common denominator here is FOOD! The hormones, the pesticides, the genetic engineering...and let's face it, with the economy being what it is, it's hard to buy organic, although I know it's voting with your dollar.

So many of these issues are so important - you start farming right and you first save the nutrients in the soil(or at least nurture them back) Cut pollution in our water since the chemicals all eventually seep into our water supply. People will live healthier, thus cutting health care costs - but the farming industry is so set in their ways for profit etc it seems like were stuck with it. For the government to decide to impliment real regulations would be political suicide for most of them..it's a vicious cycle.

All of us who were raised in the 60-70-80 were raised on processed food (unless you were raised in a hippy commune!(then lucky you!)From formula that they told our mothers was healthier than breast milk to convience foods, it seems that only NOW are we realizing the mistakes of our parents, that they were sold a total bill of goods that these processed foods were ok. Laiden with fat and sugar and white flour to do one thing, make us addicted so that we want more fat, flour and sugar. This generation needs to leave a legacy to our children and that is to somehow start a revolution. It's not about earthy crunch vegan animal rights crazed people it's a very real problem, from epic obesity to cancer. However the food industry is so powerful and the lobbyists so intergrated into the political machine it seems sadly, like an impossible task.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Michelle
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Howling into a Healthy 2011
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BLC 15 *Wisteria Wolves!
BLC 14 *Dark Blue Divas!*
BLC 13 *Dark Blue Divas!*

"Publication is a self-invasion of privacy."
- Marshall McLuhan

www.michelle-kaplan.com


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DDOORN
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1/31/10 8:09 A

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And you know...once you *know*, how can you stick your head in the sand...?

Don

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

rules4humans.com


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MICHLUVSBOSTON
MICHLUVSBOSTON's Photo SparkPoints: (21,411)
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1/31/10 7:58 A

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This is so depressing...is NOTHING safe anymore! From toys in China, to recent car recalls, to our own neighborhood streets where our kids cannot go outside unsupervised. This really sucks!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Michelle
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
Howling into a Healthy 2011
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
BLC 15 *Wisteria Wolves!
BLC 14 *Dark Blue Divas!*
BLC 13 *Dark Blue Divas!*

"Publication is a self-invasion of privacy."
- Marshall McLuhan

www.michelle-kaplan.com


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DDOORN
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1/30/10 10:35 P

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Wow...! I know I've posted a lot of nay-saying articles about the dangers and pitfalls of certain foods, but this one really blind-sided me and was a 2 x 4 wake up call to how CLUELESS so many of us (including yours truly) are! There is SO MUCH about our food that we need to understand...!

Shrimp's Dirty Secrets: Why America's Favorite Seafood Is a Health and Environmental Nightmare

www.alternet.org/story/145369/

Americans love their shrimp. It's the most popular seafood in the country, but unfortunately much of the shrimp we eat are a cocktail of chemicals, harvested at the expense of one of the world's productive ecosystems. Worse, guidelines for finding some kind of "sustainable shrimp" are so far nonexistent.

In his book, Bottomfeeder: How to Eat Ethically in a World of Vanishing Seafood , Taras Grescoe paints a repulsive picture of how shrimp are farmed in one region of India. The shrimp pond preparation begins with urea, superphosphate, and diesel, then progresses to the use of piscicides (fish-killing chemicals like chlorine and rotenone), pesticides and antibiotics (including some that are banned in the U.S.), and ends by treating the shrimp with sodium tripolyphosphate (a suspected neurotoxicant), Borax, and occasionally caustic soda.

Upon arrival in the U.S., few if any, are inspected by the FDA, and when researchers have examined imported ready-to-eat shrimp, they found 162 separate species of bacteria with resistance to 10 different antibiotics. And yet, as of 2008, Americans are eating 4.1 pounds of shrimp apiece each year -- significantly more than the 2.8 pounds per year we each ate of the second most popular seafood, canned tuna. But what are we actually eating without knowing it? And is it worth the price -- both to our health and the environment?

Understanding the shrimp that supplies our nation's voracious appetite is quite complex. Overall, the shrimp industry represents a dismantling of the marine ecosystem, piece by piece. Farming methods range from those described above to some that are more benign. Problems with irresponsible methods of farming don't end at the "yuck," factor as shrimp farming is credited with destroying 38 percent of the world's mangroves, some of the most diverse and productive ecosystems on earth. Mangroves sequester vast amounts of carbon and serve as valuable buffers against hurricanes and tsunamis. Some compare shrimp farming methods that demolish mangroves to slash-and-burn agriculture. A shrimp farmer will clear a section of mangroves and close it off to ensure that the shrimp cannot escape. Then the farmer relies on the tides to refresh the water, carrying shrimp excrement and disease out to sea. In this scenario, the entire mangrove ecosystem is destroyed and turned into a small dead zone for short-term gain. Even after the shrimp farm leaves, the mangroves do not come back.

A more responsible farming system involves closed, inland ponds that use their wastewater for agricultural irrigation instead of allowing it to pollute oceans or other waterways. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program , when a farm has good disease management protocols, it does not need to use so many antibiotics or other chemicals.

One more consideration, even in these cleaner systems, is the wild fish used to feed farmed shrimp. An estimated average of 1.4 pounds of wild fish are used to produce every pound of farmed shrimp. Sometimes the wild fish used is bycatch -- fish that would be dumped into the ocean to rot if they weren't fed to shrimp -- but other times farmed shrimp dine on species like anchovies, herring, sardines and menhaden. These fish are important foods for seabirds, big commercial fish and whales, so removing them from the ecosystem to feed farmed shrimp is problematic.

Additionally, some shrimp are wild-caught, and while they aren't raised in a chemical cocktail, the vast majority is caught using trawling, a highly destructive fishing method. Football field-sized nets are dragged along the ocean floor, scooping up and killing several pounds of marine life for every pound of shrimp they catch and demolishing the ocean floor ecosystem as they go. Where they don't clear-cut coral reefs or other rich ocean floor habitats, they drag their nets through the mud, leaving plumes of sediment so large they are visible from outer space.

After trawling destroys an ocean floor, the ecosystem often cannot recover for decades, if not centuries or millennia. This is particularly significant because 98 percent of ocean life lives on or around the seabed. Depending on the fishery, the amount of bycatch (the term used for unwanted species scooped up and killed by trawlers) ranges from five to 20 pounds per pound of shrimp. These include sharks, rays, starfish, juvenile red snapper, sea turtles and more. While shrimp trawl fisheries only represent 2 percent of the global fish catch, they are responsible for over one-third of the world's bycatch. Trawling is comparable to bulldozing an entire section of rainforest in order to catch one species of bird.

Given this disturbing picture, how can an American know how to find responsibly farmed or fished shrimp? Currently, it's near impossible. Only 15 percent of our total shrimp consumption comes from the U.S. (both farmed and wild sources). The U.S. has good regulations on shrimp farming, so purchasing shrimp farmed in the U.S. is not a bad way to go. Wild shrimp, with a few exceptions, is typically obtained via trawling and should be avoided. The notable exceptions are spot prawns from British Columbia, caught in traps similar to those used for catching lobster, and the small salad shrimp like the Northern shrimp from the East Coast or pink shrimp from Oregon, both of which are certified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council. However, neither are true substitutes for the large white and tiger shrimp American consumers are used to.

The remaining 85 percent came from other countries and about two-thirds of our imports are farmed with the balance caught in the wild, mostly via trawling. China is the world's top shrimp producer -- both farmed and wild -- but only 2 percent of China's shrimp are imported to the U.S. The world's number two producer, Thailand, is our top foreign source of shrimp. Fully one third of the shrimp the U.S. imports comes from Thailand, and over 80 percent of those shrimp are farmed.

The next biggest sources of U.S. shrimp are Ecuador, Indonesia, China, Mexico, Vietnam, Malaysia and India. Together, those countries provide nearly 90 percent of America's imported shrimp. Interestingly, Ecuador's shrimp industry exists almost entirely to supply U.S. demand, with over 93 percent of its shrimp coming up north to the U.S. The vast majority of those shrimp (almost 90 percent) are farmed. Sadly, shrimp production is responsible for the destruction of 70 percent of Ecuador's mangroves. Farming practices in other countries range from decent to awful, but there's currently no real way for a consumer to tell whether shrimp from any particular country was farmed sustainably or not.

Geoff Shester, senior science manager of Monterey Bay's Seafood Watch, says that ethical shrimp consumption is a chicken and egg problem. On one hand, the solution is for consumers to show demand for responsibly farmed and wild shrimp by eating it but on the other hand, ethical shrimp choices are not yet widely available. Seafood Watch is working with some of the largest seafood buyers in the U.S. to help them buy better shrimp, but it's currently a major challenge.

The first challenge is that labeling and certification programs do not yet exist to identify which farmed shrimp meet sustainable production standards. The second challenge is that even when such programs are in place, the U.S. demand will likely greatly exceed their supply.

Shester's advice to consumers right now is "only buy shrimp that you know comes from a sustainable source. If you can't tell for sure, try something else from the Seafood Watch yellow or green lists ." Knowing that many will be unwilling to give up America's favorite seafood, he advocates simply eating less of it and keeping an eye on future updates to the Seafood Watch guide to eating sustainable seafood.

Jill Richardson is the founder of the blog La Vida Locavore and a member of the Organic Consumers Association policy advisory board. She is the author of Recipe for America: Why Our Food System Is Broken and What We Can Do to Fix It.

Co-Team Leader for All Health Pros, Binghamton Area Losers & Laid Off But Staying Strong SparkTeams

Don't die with your music still in you. -- Dr. Wayne Dyer

"We either make ourselves miserable or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same." --- Carlos Castaneda

"You yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe, deserve your love and affection." --- Buddha

rules4humans.com


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