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KMICHELE40's Photo KMICHELE40 Posts: 294
10/31/07 9:43 A

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If you use the formula with your HR and age, it will adjust the percentage. For instance I like to be between 60 and 80, but my percent in the monitor says 67-79.

Never fear, the runner just shows how many more miles until my goal this month.
10YEARSTOGETHER's Photo 10YEARSTOGETHER SparkPoints: (24,885)
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10/31/07 1:33 A

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Thanks for this information. I was actually thinking about setting the display on my HRM watch to the % of max HR rather than BPM so that I could monitor my HR. I still have a lot to learn on this subject, and being that I'm training for the 26.2 in March, I'd like to make sure I'm training right.

Thanks too for the tip - I'll try the incline run and see what my max HR is and/or try the calculation where I take my pulse in the AM.

=)

"Take pride in how far you have come, have faith in how far you can go."
...and I just so happen to have faith that I WILL wear my favoritie bikini this summer. Snap snap!


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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
10/26/07 10:55 A

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MEREDITHK02:
I have the same problem as you with easy run HR. My max is about 195 (tested running) but on an easy run I tend to "cruise" around 140-150. I'm not really too worried about that as provided I'm going slowly I consider it a recovery. Interestingly, for cycling I can easily recovery spin at 50% max HR.

HR zones are important if you're doing tempo/speedwork as then you're targeting particular systems for improvement (LT, power, etc). So you have to train in the right HR zone for the workout to achieve the best results.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
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Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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KMICHELE40's Photo KMICHELE40 Posts: 294
10/25/07 10:13 P

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Most definitly! You may qualify for cardiac rehab. center which means a specialized program just for you. To tell you the truth if you went to a gym you'd have to get clearance before they'd work with you. Save yourself a step!

Never fear, the runner just shows how many more miles until my goal this month.
APRILFOOL13 Posts: 777
10/25/07 9:25 P

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I don't, but I guess I should since I have mitral valve prolapse like the guy who dropped dead in Chicago! Truth is, it very rarely bothers me at all, and so far never when I run.

Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity.
Darrell Royal
KMICHELE40's Photo KMICHELE40 Posts: 294
10/24/07 3:18 P

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Your HR will change as your body becomes more efficient. That's why many accredited organizations recommend using the heart rate reserve method. Pretty much, you need to know what your resting heart rate is (take your pulse first thing in the morning for three days strait, then take the average. Do this from bed.) As you exercise more, the resting heart rate will go down. Take it consecutively on three days. From there, I would recomend going to http://www.exrx.net/Calculators/TargetHear
tRate.html. This website is used by personal trainers everywhere. You can get the VO2 max test done, but being a professional I wouldn't put myself through that. You can easily do submaximal testing, and that shouldn't cost as much. Most smaller gyms or any certified personal trainer can run you through them. I would make sure that your doctor agrees that you are able that there aren't any other risk factors that could prevent you from enjoying running, such as breathing problems or heart conditions. I think we all want to enjoy this. Also, make sure that about every few months or so you re-do this procedure to compensate for how efficient you are becoming! Good Luck!

Never fear, the runner just shows how many more miles until my goal this month.
CILEAN's Photo CILEAN Posts: 55
9/21/07 3:40 P

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You can also pay to get a V02Max test done. In our area, it costs about $150. It's a lot of money, but if you're training for longer distance races (i.e. marathons or Ironman triathlons) it's a good thing to do to make sure you're training in the right zone. I was given 7 zones (1 thru 5c) and told which ones to use for specific training. Problem is, each sport has very different heart rates for each zone..so you have to get retested if you want to use your zones for cycling or swimming.


1000 miles in 2008 goal

2/17 Austin marathon (1st marathon evar!!)
3/16 Shamrock Half marathon
4/6 Cherry Blossom 10 miler
4/20 Lake Anna Sprint Tri?
4/26 C&O Canal one day hike?
5/3 Arlington Science Focus 5k
5/18 Columbia Olympic Tri
6/28 PRR 4 miler
7/12 Diamond in the Rough Olympic Tri?
8/16 Luray Olympic Tri?
9/6 Patriot's Half Ironman
10/19 Nike Women's marathon (or half?)


 
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MEREDITHK02's Photo MEREDITHK02 SparkPoints: (0)
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9/21/07 3:13 P

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Thanks, guys! I asked a running coach I'm planning to use about the HR, and he says that as long as I feel comfortable that I'm fine, and that my HR on easy runs will lower as I get more efficient at running (I'm flailing all over the place now, LOL).



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KATFRIN's Photo KATFRIN SparkPoints: (0)
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9/21/07 2:56 P

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I take notice of it as it stops me from over training - as you run more you notice you can reach higher speeds at the same HR - which may be one of the reasons I think I'm slower than I actually am as I usually get a surprise when I'm cussing myself and look at the pace I'm actually running at.

As for your maximum HR of 201. It does happen - I've seen a letter posted in a cycling mag about someone in their sixties getting up to 180. There was also something on runners world about it too. We are all built differently so if you find what's best for you and you aren't overexerting yourself I wouldn't worry about it in the least. Is your resting HR faster than "normal"?

My father's HR was very low mid forties and he was warned by a doctor that people might suspect a heart attack if they didn't know that he was actually a cyclist who timetrialled every weekend!
You might find similar reactions if you resting rate is high.
Kat


SW - 93.6 kg - 20 May 2006

I'm *just* overweight again!!!


I measure in Kilos and Centimeters!



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TORONTOGAL's Photo TORONTOGAL Posts: 236
9/21/07 2:19 P

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Hi Meredith,
I, too, was concered about my heart rate. I think that HR can be a very personal thing; for one person running at 160BPM would leave them breathless, for others, 160 is normal for their running pace. That's why, in addition to monitoring the #'s on the HRM, I try to use the "talk test" that a few members on the boards have advised. If I can talk (or sing a bit to the song), with being just a bit breathless, I'm at the low end. At the high end, I can talk a bit, but find my breath is getting tougher. It seems to be working for me while I'm trying to get my endurance and speed up. I've been logging my official HRM stats, and have noticed that although my max always hits over 180, my average seems to going down. I also find that the longer the run, the higher my HR will creep up.

Good luck!

my lunch hours aren't for eating, my saturday mornings aren't for sleeping, and my holidays aren't for taking it easy...I AM A RUNNER


 
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CMM339's Photo CMM339 Posts: 6,033
9/21/07 8:21 A

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I check out my heart rate monitor to see how it's going but I pay more attention to my body to see how I feel as I run. When I need a break I take it.

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CFOSTER1966's Photo CFOSTER1966 Posts: 3,206
9/21/07 8:09 A

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For a year now, I would run and hope to get my heart rate at 80% but a personal trainer just told me last week that I was doing it all wrong. He gave me a formula by Mark Allen and told me to follow it for awhile. I have done this for a couple of runs now and I now LOVE running when before I tolerated it. It seems that with all the other exercise I do, I was exercising way too vigorously. Go figure. :)

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MEREDITHK02's Photo MEREDITHK02 SparkPoints: (0)
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9/20/07 9:09 P

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Thanks Katybeth, JAKST24, and Rhonda! Guess I'll keep hoping that with more mileage comes more knowledge!

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LESSARDRL's Photo LESSARDRL SparkPoints: (11,775)
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9/20/07 8:59 P

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I used to pay attention to it but I could never stay in range so I gave up - lol. however, now that I'm in better shape I think I'm probably staying in range since my breathing is certainly easier. I should check it again.

Rhonda (34) - mom to 4 (ages 10, 8, almost 4, 2)


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JAKST24 Posts: 135
9/20/07 6:22 P

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When I first started running, I did the math to make sure my heart rate was in the right place. Now I know just by putting my fingers to my neck if the beat is too fast or slow. It took a while, but now I can see what is best for my body.

 
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KATYBETH's Photo KATYBETH Posts: 697
9/20/07 4:09 P

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From what I understand, you can reset most HRM to have a programmed MHR - you can do 3-4 minutes of very strenuous exercise and find what the highest reading on your HRM is...and use that as your max (I think that's what the pp was suggesting). Also, I think it's just supposed to be a guide...obviously the better shape you're in, the lower your heart rate will go as you're doing the same exercise...

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MEREDITHK02's Photo MEREDITHK02 SparkPoints: (0)
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9/20/07 4:06 P

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Thanks, Nancy. I know that my real max is 201, since I found it out in the real world, not on a calculator! I guess I'll just keep experimenting with what ranges I feel comfortable in.

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NANCYVV's Photo NANCYVV Posts: 5,997
9/20/07 4:01 P

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I pay attention to my HRM too. I try to stay in the mid range, but usually go to the upper range. When I do sprints I expect to go over, but I like to see how long it takes me to recover and get back into the mid to high range after a sprint. When I'm doing a steady pace for endurance I'm usually at 75% of my max.

I've been reading that the formulas aren't right for everyone. You could go full out and see what your HR reads and use that for your max if the formula doesn't work for you. Then you can enter the new number in you HRM.

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MEREDITHK02's Photo MEREDITHK02 SparkPoints: (0)
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9/20/07 2:38 P

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Thanks Libbe. I did forget to mention that I'm 26. I guess I just wanted to be sure that my training at a high HR (that still doesn't leave my exhausted) wasn't a problem.

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LYBBE1631's Photo LYBBE1631 Posts: 5,794
9/20/07 2:34 P

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Your max heartrate should be about 220 minus your age. Depending on how old you are you could be at just the right place. I do pay attention to my HRM, but even if I didn't have it on I would know when I was getting into the 'too high' category.

True religion is the life we lead...not the creed we profess.

Have no regrets.

Peace, Balance, Always

Pain is temporary - Quitting is forever.


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MEREDITHK02's Photo MEREDITHK02 SparkPoints: (0)
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9/20/07 2:28 P

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I've been reading a lot about running, and there seems to be a consensus that most running training should be at between 65%-75% of your maximum heart rate. I've checked my max with uphill sprints and it has consistently been topping off at 201. So this would put my 65-75% range at around 130-150 beats per minute. Well, even at a the start of a very slow jog, I'm up to 150-160, and by the end of today's 4 mile run (really a plodding jog) I was up to the mid 170s.

I've been building mileage and pace very gradually and I'm not sick...my heart rate is just normally that high. Does anybody else try to track their HR like this and worry about what percentage you're in? I've love any advice!

Thanks!
Meredith

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