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BUELLRIDER's Photo BUELLRIDER SparkPoints: (13,695)
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11/28/11 6:13 P

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Great tips. I love asters. I have calico, big leave, new england, silky, sky blue, and heath asters growing in my front and back yard. They sure brighten up the fall along with my goldenrod and big bluestem grass. emoticon

"Food is not just something you pull off a shelf-it has a life force to it." Dr. Oz


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HEIDISHOPE's Photo HEIDISHOPE SparkPoints: (55,234)
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11/26/11 5:29 P

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Walnut trees kill a lot of plants too. I love daffodils and narcissus but had to dig up all my bulbs I'd planted 3 years ago and give them away. They'd come up, but just wouldn't bloom with all our walnut trees. emoticon

It makes me wonder, are there other plants that are toxic to other plants? I didn't know that about sunflowers!



Blessings,
Heidi

Proverbs 3: 5-8 "Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make your paths straight. Do not be wise in your own eyes; fear the Lord and shun evil. This will bring health to your body and nourishment to your bones. "




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SUNNY332's Photo SUNNY332 Posts: 28,571
10/29/11 8:34 P

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Sounds like a great one Heidi. Do let us know when it comes out.

I got my book on Missouri Wildflowers from the Missouri Department of Conservation.

Sunny



Sunny
Missouri USA
Central Time Zone

GO IVORY FALCONS!


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HEIDISHOPE's Photo HEIDISHOPE SparkPoints: (55,234)
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10/29/11 7:22 P

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I live in Indiana. I do need to get a good wildflower guide. I heard a really good one is coming on the market soon. It's in layman's terms and organized by color instead of by the latin names, "Wildflowers and Ferns of Indiana Forests: A Field Guide" (Indiana Natural Science) by Michael A. Homoya and Marion T. Jackson. Just waiting for it to arrive on store shelves.

Blessings,
Heidi

Proverbs 3: 5-8 "Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make your paths straight. Do not be wise in your own eyes; fear the Lord and shun evil. This will bring health to your body and nourishment to your bones. "




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SUNNY332's Photo SUNNY332 Posts: 28,571
10/29/11 12:35 P

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Heidi - I don't know where you live but in our woods here in Northeast Missouri, we have wild Iris, Violets, and Dutchman's Breeches along with lots of Queen Anne's Lace and mid summer, Black Eyed susans. Every day, it seems something new is blooming.

Wherever you live, buy a guide to wildflowers for your area. I found mine at the Missouri Department of Natural Resources/Conservation. The books I found also would make amazing Christmas gifts for family that live in this area also.

Sunny

Sunny
Missouri USA
Central Time Zone

GO IVORY FALCONS!


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HEIDISHOPE's Photo HEIDISHOPE SparkPoints: (55,234)
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10/28/11 8:20 P

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Love this idea!

I was thrilled to find some heart-leafed asters bloom in areas of our woods this fall where we have been clearing the woods of briars and invasive honeysuckle for several years!! Makes me wonder what other natives have been waiting to grow now that some sunshine can reach the ground?!?!

Blessings,
Heidi

Proverbs 3: 5-8 "Trust in the Lord with all your heart
and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways acknowledge Him, and He will make your paths straight. Do not be wise in your own eyes; fear the Lord and shun evil. This will bring health to your body and nourishment to your bones. "




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2BFREE2LIVE's Photo 2BFREE2LIVE SparkPoints: (301,245)
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10/28/11 3:26 P

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Plant of the Month

Aster
A wonderful cut flower, asters make any garden explode with color at the end of the growing season. From miniature alpine plants to giants up to 6 feet tall, there are over 250 asters, with plenty of colors to choose from. Asters are a great way to brighten up the fall landscape.

Common Names: Aster, Michaelmas daisy.
Botanical Name: Aster.
Hardiness: Zones 3 to 8.
Bloom Time: Late summer through fall.
Size: 3 to 6 feet high (dwarf varieties are shorter).
Flowers: Purple, white, pink, blue, and red daisy-like flowers.
Light Needs: Full sun to partial shade.
Growing Advice: Can be planted any time during growing season, preferably early in northern states, so cultivars can get established before winter. Plant at least 2 feet apart with the crown even with the soil surface.

Prize Picks: For the ultimate in low-maintenance gardening, choose Purple Dome asters, which form a small, tight mass of blooms that require no pinching or staking. Alma Potschke can reach heights of 4 feet and usually need staking; its flowers are vivid pink.
Take a look at these other plants that provide fabulous fall color.


Yard Smarts

Leftover Leaves
After raking autumn leaves into bags, I pile the bags in an out-of-the-way corner. In spring, I line the aisles of the garden with old newspapers, and then cover them with the leaves. The combination of newspaper and leaves holds in moisture and minimizes weeds. It also provides a nice place to walk when the rest of the garden is muddy. In fall, all this is organic matter, and the cycle continues. —Nita Young, Nebo, North Carolina


Not-So-Friendly Neighbors
I planted my gladiolus bulbs right next to my sunflowers and I had no glads. Are the sunflowers to blame?

Poor growth or a lack of flowers on your glads may be the result of shade created by their tall neighbors. The sunflowers can also out-compete their neighbors for water and nutrients.

Sunflowers are allelopathic, meaning all parts contain a toxin that can harm other plants. These chemicals help plants reduce competition from weeds and other neighboring plants. Though most gardeners, myself included, have not had trouble growing sunflowers in beds, vegetable gardens or other areas, some problems have been observed in large commercial planting and crop rotations. So next time, find a sunny spot for your glads.



Frugal Backyard Tip

Recycle Old Carpet
Don’t spend a lot of money to create a new flower bed. Cover the area with old carpet in fall. By spring, the grass will be dead, and the soil will be moist and ready to fill.




"You're never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream..." C.S. Lewis


“Don't wait until everything is just right. It will never be perfect. There will always be challenges, obstacles and less than perfect conditions. So what. Get started now. With each step you take, you will grow stronger and stronger, more and more skilled, more and more self-confident and more and more successful.” ~Mark Victor Hansen

www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwE8HLLue48


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