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MOONEYES1 Posts: 2,278
10/29/09 10:13 P

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I say, if I get 1/3 of the crop I intend, I'm a winner!
You're a winner!
Linda in Colorado

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TRAINOF4's Photo TRAINOF4 Posts: 2,650
10/29/09 10:07 P

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As I have been taught - a moderate snowfall acts as an insulator to the plant, it actually can help keep the plant from freezing. However, I've always wrapped towels around the pots (the actual pot) to keep the roots from freezing.

THis has worked for me about half the time.

Stay calm and carry on.
MOONEYES1 Posts: 2,278
10/29/09 7:54 P

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Well, if you haven't been watching the news...we have a regular snow storm out here in Colorado!
I brought in my rosemary, though I wasn't sure, but didn't want to take chances...all else fails I'll cook it up! I also left out my french tarragon?
Does anyone know if that will be all right in a REAL winter?
I have brought in my geraniums-takeing cuttings this year--hoping to have bushels of them next year-I have some real bloomers!
Also, took my amarillis in,,,I know--WHAT is it doing out? Well, it is an experiment--I know nothing about this plant but got several free for attending a garden show. This year I found out they like to be potbound so I hope to dry them out and plant them all together. I did get one bloom last year--out of 5, the others just had babies!! It may have been a little late though, as they did get frosted.
That's all for now.
Linda in Colorado

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TRAINOF4's Photo TRAINOF4 Posts: 2,650
10/29/09 2:48 P

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Sounds like a perfect definition to me. Even growing up in FL we would have these rare cold snaps where everything would freeze & we had to put sheets, towels, and rags across our outside plants.

The orange groves used smudge pots to help keep the air around the flowers & fruit on the citrus trees at a slightly warmer level. It was a dirty, smoky, smelly job, but had to be done. It was all manual labor even when I was a kid in the 70s; would hope that by now they'd have something easier for that job.

It seems I recall the strawberry fields being sprinkled w/water throughout freezing temps to protect them, but I can't remember why that worked.
A real solid freeze in FL was very rare, but it kicked up a lot of panic - agriculture was a major industry in FL & a single freeze could ruin an entire growing season.

Stay calm and carry on.
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10/26/09 12:48 P

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Ok. Thanks. That makes sense to me now. LOL

"Every Job Is A Self-Portrait Of The Person Who Did It. Autograph Your Work With Excellence."

"One step back equals two steps forward. We are always a step ahead by continuing."


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CWAITES's Photo CWAITES Posts: 7,258
10/26/09 12:25 P

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To me it means to do something to keep alive a plant that would normally be killed off during the winter. Maybe by bringing a pot inside or rooting pieces of something to put back outside next year. Anybody have a better definition?

FlowerChild from Alabama
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10/25/09 11:18 A

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I don't even know what OVERWINTER means???



"Every Job Is A Self-Portrait Of The Person Who Did It. Autograph Your Work With Excellence."

"One step back equals two steps forward. We are always a step ahead by continuing."


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TRAINOF4's Photo TRAINOF4 Posts: 2,650
10/21/09 4:34 P

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We have a giant rose of sharon that is loaded with blooms every year. We live in zone 6/7 (depending on how you interpret the USDA map!) and it survives long-term freezing weather & comes back strong every spring/summer.

The best part of having the rosemary inside is how lovely it smells when you brush against it while doing household things.

Stay calm and carry on.
CKRYSZAK's Photo CKRYSZAK Posts: 120
10/19/09 8:50 A

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This year I brought 3 plants inside for the winter:
- The only geranium plant that survived 2 days of frost
- Violas
- A one-year-old rose of sharon that I grew from a seed (I'll plant it outside next spring)
Reading through the other ideas in this blog, I think I may bring in the rosemary and sage too before they freeze.
-Cindy

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TRAINOF4's Photo TRAINOF4 Posts: 2,650
10/18/09 8:20 P

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That's what we need - a greenhouse! You can buy them at Costco these days for very little money & put them togther yourself. I always thought it would be great to have one so I could have mini-fruit trees (oranges, limes, olives) and grow tomatoes all year.

Stay calm and carry on.
HERBKAT's Photo HERBKAT SparkPoints: (100,997)
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10/18/09 12:28 A

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I bring my fuchsias, geraniums, lime tree, Russian sage, and some petunias into my greenhouse for the winter. The herbs, including a potted bay tree, stay outside. The potted miniature roses either go into the greenhouse if there's room, or get put to bed under a blanket of leaves. emoticon

Kat ~ Willamette Valley, Oregon

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ESMERILDA1313's Photo ESMERILDA1313 Posts: 1,640
10/17/09 9:18 A

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All I over winter is the potted flower and plants, good luck with yours. emoticon

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CWAITES's Photo CWAITES Posts: 7,258
10/16/09 8:39 P

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I may dig up my Sago Palm this year. It always seems to make it, but dies off so much that it has to start over every spring. I'm thinking it may do better in a big pot that I can bring inside. I'm also going to bring in some of my Cuban Oregano plant - I love that stuff!

FlowerChild from Alabama
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Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass......it is about learning how to dance in the rain.

What the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the Master calls a butterfly. Richard Bach
TRAINOF4's Photo TRAINOF4 Posts: 2,650
10/16/09 3:23 P

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Comments under another thread got me thinking ..in areas of the country where cold temps would kill some of your favorite plants what plants will you protect either through covering them or bringing them inside?

For me it's a gardenia & a rosemary. This year I'm also keeping 2 osmanthus fragrans (fragrant tea olive) inside until the spring. I ordered them with the intention of putting them in the ground & having them established by the time we got into cold weather. Unfortunately we seem to have jumped from late summer to late fall in just less than 2 weeks. I'm keeping my fingers crossed that they'll make it through winter.

Stay calm and carry on.
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