Author: Sorting Last Post on Top ↓ Message:
MELINKY's Photo MELINKY Posts: 6,319
2/15/09 7:59 P

Send Private Message
Reply
rabbit droppings are good too.

Mel
xx

Teamleader
Schooling at Home
and Co-leader of
"Presidential Watchdogs"

No change of circumstances can repair a defect of character.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, writer

Choices are the hinges of destiny.
----Pythagoras

www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=484


 current weight: 119.2 
 
151
142.75
134.5
126.25
118
SHOCK72's Photo SHOCK72 Posts: 391
2/15/09 8:46 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
your right, frest cow/horse manure can burn plants. Thank you I forgot to mention that important tip. It is better if you have old manure.




"Motivation , is a gift we give ourselves. Inspiration, is a gift we give to others."


 current weight: 176.6 
 
185
171.25
157.5
143.75
130
SUZIEQW's Photo SUZIEQW SparkPoints: (59,991)
Fitness Minutes: (36,411)
Posts: 4,715
2/14/09 5:47 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I learned the hard way...the fresh cow/horse manure needs time (several months?). If you plant right away, it will burn your plants.

I love square foot gardening!

does anyone compost right into their raised bed garden?

5/3 - 5K @28:50
12/13/09 - 1/2 marathon
1/31/10 - Miami Marathon!!! 5:26:48

I get up. I walk. I fall down. Meanwhile, I keep dancing." – Rabbi Hillel



 current weight: 131.0 
 
131
129.25
127.5
125.75
124
VONBLACKBIRD's Photo VONBLACKBIRD Posts: 10,039
2/14/09 5:02 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
The feed and seed store here sells cow manure by the truck load. It will help with the composting. I think the sand would help the most. As for the wildlife getting your tomatoes. ...I'm in western Arkansas and we sometimes have trouble with the ground hogs eating the tomatoes. We finally put an electric fence around as not only were the ground hogs bad but the racoons were getting the corn and the deer the peas. If it is something eating the leaves then probably moth worms. And best way is to pick them off or use 7 dust. And it will take several years to get the soil just right. I personally wouldn't use fish for fertilizer. Manure is the best.

"In Him we are chosen, having been predestined according to the plan of Him who works out everything in conformity with the purpose of His will" Eph.1:11
*****Barbara****
Arkansas central time

Team leader: Homebodies vintage-spice-everything-nice.blogsp
ot.com
gnomes-home.blogspot.com
Central Standard Time


 current weight: 190.0 
 
211
195.75
180.5
165.25
150
SHOCK72's Photo SHOCK72 Posts: 391
2/14/09 1:06 P

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
Fish can be used BUT it is trickier due to the amnomia and bad smell plus it can attract animals plus if not don right it can be bad micro-organisms. Here is a start on the info for fish compost.
http://tinyurl.com/csw9bg
Hope this helps.



"Motivation , is a gift we give ourselves. Inspiration, is a gift we give to others."


 current weight: 176.6 
 
185
171.25
157.5
143.75
130
CWAITES's Photo CWAITES Posts: 7,258
2/14/09 11:50 A

Send Private Message
Reply
I've heard of using the water from fresh-water tanks because it has stuff in it that's good. I think they usually recommend not using anything that might draw animals to your garden, though.

FlowerChild from Alabama
¸.•´¸.•*´¨) -:¦:- ¸.•*¨)
(¸-:¦:-.•cheri *´¨)
(¸.•´-:¦:- (¸.•*
Co-leader of Photobugs teams.sparkpeople.com/photobugs

Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass......it is about learning how to dance in the rain.

What the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the Master calls a butterfly. Richard Bach
MELINKY's Photo MELINKY Posts: 6,319
2/14/09 11:33 A

Send Private Message
Reply
isn't fish good compost? It's what the native Americans used for their crops.

Mel
xx

Teamleader
Schooling at Home
and Co-leader of
"Presidential Watchdogs"

No change of circumstances can repair a defect of character.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, writer

Choices are the hinges of destiny.
----Pythagoras

www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=484


 current weight: 119.2 
 
151
142.75
134.5
126.25
118
SHOCK72's Photo SHOCK72 Posts: 391
2/14/09 11:11 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I know alot of times people recommend when you do a raised bed that you put 2 inches of gravel, then 2 inches of sand then your soil.
As for soil you may want to add verticulite and more organic compost to it. If you are going all organic then you may not want to do this but fertilize with a slow release fertilizer may help. ALso, mulching will help keep the water in.
Cow manure, worm castings, mushroom compost is all very good(also can be added to your homemade compost). those who want to make your own may want to check out square foot gardening.
Compost in a well ventilated container.
Normally you can use alot around the house for composting such as:
egg shells, fruit cores, peelings, coffee grounds anything that is not greasy or meat can be composted.Meat,fat, bones, dairy products compose slowly and pet waste spread bad organisms and can attract insects and bad odors. Manure from barn yard animals are great and can be used. Grass clippings, weeds(watch the kinds that can take over your compost), leaves can also be composted. Paper, small branches, corn stalks and twigs and straw can be used. Then water enough to remain damp but not water logged. If odor becomes a problem, sprinkle with agricultural lime. Heat and turning it helps with compostion when done right. When it breaks down so you cannot see anything in particular that you added together then your compost is ready.
If all else fails then like I said before do a ph analyis of your soil. Your soil maybe too acid or too akaline for your plants.


"Motivation , is a gift we give ourselves. Inspiration, is a gift we give to others."


 current weight: 176.6 
 
185
171.25
157.5
143.75
130
BLUESTARMOM's Photo BLUESTARMOM Posts: 3,144
2/14/09 10:46 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
I've been meaning to post this. I got a really neat little compost bin at Sam's Club last weekend for $39. It's made out of recycled plastic, and it was super easy to put together. I've got to level out some ground to put it on this weekend and I've already started saving some scraps- I can't wait to have it going!

Karen
Support our Troops!
ALLYINTEXAS's Photo ALLYINTEXAS Posts: 3,463
2/14/09 10:29 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply

Thanks for the replies!

We did till 2-3 feet at least using a rented roto-tiller. We planned to build the bed one course high, but instead went two (16 in.). So one concern is that with the rich, loose soil, and the raised bed height, maybe the water drained too quickly to the original foundation below (?).

We brought in nine yards of a rich soil called "Organic-Growers' Mix" which includes organic compost, lava sand, Texas Greensand, and a soil/sand mixture. It's remained very loose. In the area roto-tilled, we really worked it to get out all the rocks and large chunks of clay so that it was loose. We added in a mushroom compost to the original soil, but did not add any sand to it. The additional soil brought in was placed in the raised area above the tilled/mulched soil.

Do y'all have a favorite compost type?

The jalapeno plants produced an awesome crop, but the plants did not grow as tall as they have in past years. Tomatoes did okay, but we have a constant battle of with area "wildlife" --- something around here likes our tomatoes as much as we do.


*** SAVE A LIFE! ADOPT A RESCUE/SHELTER DOG OR CAT***

*** I'm not perfect, but Jesus thinks I'm to die for! ***
CWAITES's Photo CWAITES Posts: 7,258
2/14/09 10:27 A

Send Private Message
Reply
I agree with what has been said. You've got to improve the ground below where you added the good soil and that will take some time. You're off to a good start, but you will have to keep adding compost and other things until it filters down into that second level. Start a compost pile now and you will have a good source of free material for add-ins for your garden. And be careful with tilling - I've read that you can actually till too much which can further dry your soil and damage its structure.

FlowerChild from Alabama
¸.•´¸.•*´¨) -:¦:- ¸.•*¨)
(¸-:¦:-.•cheri *´¨)
(¸.•´-:¦:- (¸.•*
Co-leader of Photobugs teams.sparkpeople.com/photobugs

Life is not about waiting for the storms to pass......it is about learning how to dance in the rain.

What the caterpillar calls the end of the world, the Master calls a butterfly. Richard Bach
MELINKY's Photo MELINKY Posts: 6,319
2/14/09 9:57 A

Send Private Message
Reply
horse manure works wonders. I'm sure you can get it free just about anywhere. =)

Mel
xx

Teamleader
Schooling at Home
and Co-leader of
"Presidential Watchdogs"

No change of circumstances can repair a defect of character.
Ralph Waldo Emerson, writer

Choices are the hinges of destiny.
----Pythagoras

www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/groups_i
ndividual.asp?gid=484


 current weight: 119.2 
 
151
142.75
134.5
126.25
118
SHOCK72's Photo SHOCK72 Posts: 391
2/14/09 7:54 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
What kind of soil did you add?

I would try adding sand as Deesparks said first. Sand would help with hard, clay like soil.

Have you tried spagnum peat? It is a soil softener and also organic, plus holds water.

You may want to get a ph analysis of your soil if your plants do not get any better this year. Adding more compost to your soil can help also.

Edited by: SHOCK72 at: 2/14/2009 (07:58)

"Motivation , is a gift we give ourselves. Inspiration, is a gift we give to others."


 current weight: 176.6 
 
185
171.25
157.5
143.75
130
DEECAFFEINATED's Photo DEECAFFEINATED Posts: 3,227
2/14/09 6:44 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply
If you tilled the soil below the raised bed but didn't add compost and sand then it went back to clay as soon as it settled. The roots would have either been forced shallow in the raised bed or not done well if they did penetrate the clay.

I have clay soil here in PA and tilled 2-3 feet down with a roto tiller, added 10-15 5lb bags of sand and tons of compost and a few bags of manure. Worked it all in with the tiller and plants thrived. (I kid you not on adding that much sand. Beware of peat moss as it will only dry up your beds.)

This year will till again, add compost and manure and see if more sand is needed still. Retill and level it out getting as many rocks out as possible.

Locals tell me it takes 2-3 years here to establish a good garden and this year is my second year.

Edited by: DEECAFFEINATED at: 2/14/2009 (06:46)
-:|:- Dee -:|:-
Joy is a state of being regardless of our circumstances. Find a way.

designed-by-dee.blogspot.com


 Pounds lost: 8.5 
 
0
4.5
9
13.5
18
ALLYINTEXAS's Photo ALLYINTEXAS Posts: 3,463
2/14/09 2:59 A

My SparkPage
Send Private Message
Reply

Last year, we tilled our Texas clay soil (think concrete!) and then built a 100sf raised bed garden; we used concrete blocks for the perimeter. We then brought in rich, fertile soil. Our plants did well, but we could tell they could have thrived more. We think because the soil was so loose in the raised bed that the water drained more quickly below the plants.

Does anyone have a suggestion of any type of material (compost?) we might add to our soil to hold more moisture at the plant root level? We're in North Texas, Zone 8.

Thanks!


*** SAVE A LIFE! ADOPT A RESCUE/SHELTER DOG OR CAT***

*** I'm not perfect, but Jesus thinks I'm to die for! ***
Page: 1 of (1)  

Report Innappropriate Post

Other VEGGIES & BLOOMS GARDENING TEAM General Team Discussion Forum Posts

Topics: Last Post:
Indoor Gardening 1/26/2014 11:47:13 AM
Vertical Shoe Bag Garden 4/14/2014 11:01:47 AM
HAPPY EASTER EVERYONE! 4/20/2014 2:14:04 PM
BLOOMING TUESDAYS 9/10/2013 9:50:24 PM
CHAT LINES NOW OPEN FOR 2013 12/29/2013 1:33:42 PM

Thread URL: http://www.sparkpeople.com/myspark/team_messageboard_thread.asp?board=0x19538x22894231

Review our Community Guidelines