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KAPELAKIN's Photo KAPELAKIN Posts: 1,971
9/21/12 9:38 P

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Thanks for all the suggestions! Espresso shots are a great idea, I'll definitely remember that. They had one portapotty at the start of my 8.6 mile race, and 5 minutes before start, we were all dashing off into the woods to pee, but that won't be an option at the location of my half. Hopefully the staging area is better-equipped at this race. I don't really have a problem starting out too fast, because I enjoy passing people later in the race. emoticon

I am getting excited for this race. I'm going to go drive the course this weekend, so I know where the meanest hills are and where I can afford to go a little faster. This weekend I'm planning a 9 mile tempo run, then a couple shorter, easier runs, probably Tuesday and Thursday. I'll be sure to report back when I'm done. Thanks again!

Voluntary Discomfort is the secret cornerstone of strength. We build our whole lives around increasing comfort and avoiding discomfort, and yet by doing so we are drinking a can of Weakness Tonic with every morning’s breakfast. ~Mr. Money Mustache
5K PR: 23:40
10K PR: 48:57
HM PR: 1:59:37
30K: 2:57:44


CDANDERS05's Photo CDANDERS05 Posts: 356
9/21/12 6:59 P

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I like to fuel up about an hour to 90 minutes before my run with whole grain bread with peanut butter and honey then I started something new--added the Bolthouse Coffee Protein Plus drink. I rarely consume caffeine and it really gave me the edge that day.

**B.S., ACSM Personal Trainer and NETA Group Fitness Instructor**

Dedication, Motivation, Perserverance :)


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CDANDERS05's Photo CDANDERS05 Posts: 356
9/21/12 6:58 P

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I like to fuel up about an hour to 90 minutes before my run with whole grain bread with peanut butter and honey then I started something new--added the Bolthouse Coffee Protein Plus drink. I rarely consume caffeine and it really gave me the edge that day.

**B.S., ACSM Personal Trainer and NETA Group Fitness Instructor**

Dedication, Motivation, Perserverance :)


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TIMOTHYNOHE's Photo TIMOTHYNOHE Posts: 4,317
9/20/12 9:28 P

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I break my race up into three parts. I run the first 3 miles/5k at a relaxed pace, a little below what I want my overall pace to be. After that I begin 1 mile run/1 minute walk at a faster, comfortable pace until about mile 10. The final 5k I run with whatever I have left. That may or may not mean that I incorporate any more walking. But this is my fnal push, so I try to get my best time possible. The walk intervals act as littl emini vacations and more than make up for the "lost" time by allowing my legs to have a litlle recovery.

Start by doing what is necessary, then do what is possible and suddenly you will be doing the impossible -- St Francis of Assisi

Rock 'n' Roll Dublin Half Marathon, Dublin, Ireland, 8/5/2013
ie.competitor.com/dublin/


EMMANYC's Photo EMMANYC Posts: 1,702
9/20/12 5:22 P

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I have only done one HM and one 10-mile race, plus a handful of 5-mile and 10K races (all in the past year). I'm lucky to pick up tips from my husband and sister, who are both jackrabbits with many marathons and HMs under their Spi-belts.

I'm not a speedy runner, in part because I combine running and walking to help me deal with back pain. That said, I think some of my race strategies might still be useful to you.

1) Strike the right balance between being hydrated and avoiding spending too much time in potty pit stops. When I did my first HM, I had to cycle through the potties at the start of the race 3 times and I still wanted to use a toilet again by mile 2. But the lines were long so I waited until mile 6, and even then I lost 5 minutes in a line-up.

Now, I do have the world's tiniest bladder, and I also like to drink a couple of big cups of coffee in the morning. So I changed that habit for race days. Now, I drink a couple of tiny espressos - enough caffeine, not too much liquid. I don't need to drink liquid on races that are shorter than 10K, but in my recent 10-mile race, I drank a cup of water at about the 30 and 50 minute marks. I felt energetic and by the end of the race I "could" use the toilet but didn't desperately need to.

I also ate some semi-salty carbs in the two days before race day (a couple of servings of pretzels). I think that also helped with fluid balance.

You'll have a different balance that needs to be struck, but it's good to experiment before race day so you're sufficiently hydrated but not spending too much time in potty line ups.

2) I find it hard not to run a bit quickly at the start of the race, so I indulge myself a little as follows. I'm usually in one of the slower corrals, so I'm careful to conserve my running legs by walking (not jogging) until I'm almost at the start line. Then I usually start moderately for the first minute or two, when the road is crowded. What's the point of running quickly when you're just dodging around people? Once the crowd thins out a bit, I complete the first mile at a run/walk ratio that has a bit more run in it than my usual pace. For example, my standard ratio for the 10 mile race was run 2:30 / walk 0:45. So in that first mile, I ran 2:45 / walked 0:30. It was more about psychology than speed - I just wanted to get some distance under my feet but didn't want to burn myself out. I kept my normal pace. If you wanted to do the same thing, you might think of running 0.25 mph faster than your long race pace.

3) Then I planned to run the next 7 miles at run 2:30 / walk 0:45. As it turned out, I had enough 'gas in the tank' to keep that interval/pace up to mile 9. I varied the interval slightly to accommodate uphills, downhills and water stops (e.g., to walk a water stop when I wanted to drink, or walk the hardest part of a hill, or run a downhill).

4) For the final mile, I just tried to run the intervals I could - generally, this was run 1:30 / walk 0:30. And I had enough gas in the tank to finish strong.

On 10Ks, another technique I have used is, for the 2nd half of the race, to speed up on short intervals. For example, if my planned interval is run 3 / walk 0:45, I run the first 2:30 at my usual pace (e.g., 6.5 mph), then pick up my cadence and run a bit faster (e.g., 6.75 mph) for 30 seconds, then walk for 45 seconds. If I feel like I have the energy, I'll do this in the last 2-3.1 miles of my next HM. I'll practice it, though, on my long runs.

Since you're just running, you might just add a 20-30 second faster cadence interval every 3 minutes or so in the the last few miles of the race. But you might want to wait until at least mile 9 or 10, to make sure you still feel like you have the energy for it.

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9/19/12 11:23 P

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Hi,

I think it's great to be competitive, but don't let the need to compete get in the way of your making sound choices. It's always best to start out much slower than you feel you should. Running too fast will deplete your glycogen stores at a much faster rate and remember the food you eat during your race is not loading your glycogen stores it's basically topping off the tank. You want to start out slow so that you conserve your glycogen (in the muscle and liver) and utilize fat for fuel for as long as you can. This is one of the biggest reasons why we run our LSD runs much slower than we race. We are teaching our bodies to utilize fat while conserving glycogen.

I prefer to refuel by time and not by distance. Because I know during a race my pace is generally faster so covering the distance maybe causing me to refuel too soon. I like to start refueling about 40 minutes in and then every 20 minutes or so after--ingesting about 24 grams of carbs per hour.

I have completed 20 half-marathons and they are all unique and all posed different obstacles from hills to heat, to cold and rain, which is why I don't go out to PR every race...as my former running coach once told me, "You are only as good as you are on that particular day, at that particular time, on that particular course, under those particular circumstances." Coach Lee

That doesn't mean I don't go out and do my best, but I would never consider any of my races a failure...I always learn something about each race I have done and that is to never give up.

Coach Nancy

KAPELAKIN's Photo KAPELAKIN Posts: 1,971
9/19/12 11:08 P

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Hi, I'd like to hear from those who have done a few HMs, on what your race day strategy is. So far, my longest race has been 8.6 miles, and my strategy was a good breakfast a few hours before, some fuel about a half hour before, and then I ate about 100 calories around the 3-4 mile mark. Race-wise, I jogged the first mile pretty slow, then picked up the pace miles 2-5, but walked the aid stations, figuring the time lost isn't substantial and it's a chance to catch my breath and not end up sucking water into my lungs. Once we got to the 5K start line, I kicked it up and kept a pretty fast pace for the last three miles, with a sprint at the end. I felt like I could have gone a little harder though, and I think that is the toughest part of racing. Other than experience, how do you know how much you'll have left in the tank as you get to those final miles?

Please share your wisdom and strategy, and whether you race for fun, PRs or medals. I'll be running my first HM at the end of the month, having done a 12.3 mile run last Saturday. I told myself it was just for fun when I signed up, but I'm afraid I have a bit of a competitive streak, and I don't expect to medal, but am putting some pressure on myself to finish under or very near 2:00, so I do want to have a plan.

Voluntary Discomfort is the secret cornerstone of strength. We build our whole lives around increasing comfort and avoiding discomfort, and yet by doing so we are drinking a can of Weakness Tonic with every morning’s breakfast. ~Mr. Money Mustache
5K PR: 23:40
10K PR: 48:57
HM PR: 1:59:37
30K: 2:57:44


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