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GLADGAD's Photo GLADGAD SparkPoints: (35,449)
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8/17/12 11:11 A

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It sounds like you're doing everything right and you have the right mindset. Good luck on your training and I wish you a strong and speedy recovery.

-Carolyn

"God gave you your body as a gift, so you should take care of it." - My Mom
STRIVER57's Photo STRIVER57 SparkPoints: (43,619)
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8/17/12 10:56 A

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The doctor said to do what the PT said, and the PT says try. for now, i am, as the PT said, adding 2-3 minutes per run, which is what i would be doing for recovery if i weren't thinking about doing the race. i am also walking a lot before and after once a week, to build mileage back up. IF i feel healthy and strong and have not had any pain in the interim and think i can finish in less than 4 hours, then and only then will i try it (and if there's pain then, i'll stop, even if it feels wimpy). and i ordered a copy of Galloway's Running Till You're 100. and I am listening very carefully to my body, except when it tells me i can do more than the schedule says. Thanks for your advice and support.

GLADGAD's Photo GLADGAD SparkPoints: (35,449)
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8/13/12 5:46 P

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You said that you saw a doctor who diagnosed tendonitis - what does (s)he say about your doing the race?

About 7 weeks before my first HM I strained a tendon in my ankle. The doctor said I would not be able to do the half, due to the long recovery time. I spent the next few weeks working out on the elliptical and swimming. About 10 days before the race I ran a few short miles, and a week before the race I ran about 8.5 miles. My ankle was sore, but didn't feel as bad as it had when I first injured it. I decided to go for it, and did the race. While I didn't run the whole thing, I ran most of it - slowly - and felt like crap at the end because I wasn't properly trained. Surprisingly, my ankle didn't hurt, but the rest of me did. After the half marathon I stupidly kept running on it, doing 5ks and triathlons, and while I didn't make it worse, it lengthened the time to heal from about 3 months to 9 months.

I guess what I'm trying to say is several-fold. First, listen to your doctor, but also listen to your body. If you think you can push it, then go for it. Honestly, if I would have felt any pain during the race I would have stopped immediately, but the ankle didn't flare up. It wasn't my smartest decision to do the race, and I got luck that it just happened to work out and I didn't seriously injure myself. Secondly, if you decide to do the race, then continue with the workouts that don't aggravate the injury. Give yourself some time to heal then get back to running as best you can. Understand that you will probably struggle through the race - you will have to accept that. Thirdly, keep focus on doing the race and hold off on making a final decision until a few days before the race. You can always cancel at the last minute or just be a no-show.

You say that you are doing a run/walk right now and are at 2.5k. Your body is still trained to go longer distances, so keep up the exercises that don't cause pain in order to keep up your conditioning. Slowly start adding miles to your run/walk as long as it doesn't hurt.

Good luck and let us know what you decide and how you're coming along.

-Carolyn

"God gave you your body as a gift, so you should take care of it." - My Mom
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8/13/12 5:01 P

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Hi,

Remember running is more than running. In other words, the physiological changes in the body are many when it comes to running a distance of this duration. With only 8 weeks (even if you do not include the standard 2 week taper for a half-marathon) is a very aggressive plan even if you had a stronger/longer aerobic base.

While you may have been keeping up with your cardio and ST, the principle of specificity states that in order to run, one must run. In other words, in order to run you must be running. Cycling and swimming, even walking are all great cross training activities, but they won't make running easier. This comes with training.

Remember too that the need for proper recovery is just as important as the running activtity itself. If you had more time, say 16 weeks, you may be able to do so, but with the time frame you have to work with, I would say you are better off waiting.

Coach Nancy

STRIVER57's Photo STRIVER57 SparkPoints: (43,619)
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8/13/12 4:48 P

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I was never athletic until i started running in April 2011 (at the age of 59). i have always had a problem distinguishing hypochrondria, wimpiness, and laziness from pain.
Back in March, when my long runs were up to about 7 miles (at about 12:40 min/mile for long runs), i signed up for the royal parks half marathon with Lizalot and her daughter as a charity runner for Oxfam (committing to raise at least 300 ). by June 3, I was up to 10.6 miles (all at slow increases, never more than 10% a week), at slighly under 12 min/mile. On June 4, my hip started to hurt during a run to a group run at the end of 5 k, i gave up and walked (limped home).
I've done what i was told, seen the doctor, the PT, a sports doctor, followed instructions, stopped running for 3.5 weeks twice (because the first time the pain started up again). diagnosis is tendonitis of the gluteus medius. walking caused discomfort as well (but not using my ancient nordic track ski machine, which has no impact because you never lift or put down your feet ).
so 3 days ago, i ran again, so to speak: 10 min at 30/30 intervals. no pain or even twinges while running, some twinges later. 2 days after that, 15.5 min, at the same intervals, no pain or twinges while running, somewhat more twinges later.
i don't care (much) about my time anymore. i'd like to do a real walk/run pace with a reasonable amount of running, but mostly i want to go and do it and finish it, regardless. also fundraise more rather than having to pay the balance myself (and feeling i have to offer to repay the people who made contributions, although i'm sure most will say no).
i do understand that i have to stop running at any point that i feel pain or even more than slight twinges. and that if that happens, i can't run the half (though maybe i could walk it). what i don't know is if it's realistic to even try training to run for it it's 8 more weeks, and i'm running 2.5 k right now (but i have kept up cardio and ST and i am stronger than that): is there any possibility that i can get my distance back up to 10 or 11 miles in that amount of time without re-injury? what kind of schedule would make sense. and is it likely i can try at any point to move my running intervals higher than 30 seconds? if my long run is a run/walk for a given period and a walk for the rest ???
i know none of you are my doctor or my PT or my coach. this race is very important to me, but so is being able to get back to running regularly and healthily. what do you think is reasonable to try or unreasonable to try?
(cross posted to blog and running teams)

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