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SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
11/5/07 12:55 P

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W: No real need to clarify. I think we got the point of your post. That's a good point to make too. I know that I wanted to make sure people knew that if you make a repair like that on the road that it was for a temporary fix. Checking pressure before you go riding is a must. Keep the good times and tips rolling.
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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
11/5/07 9:37 A

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Should really have clarified my point about CO2... emoticon

It's fine, of course but if you use CO2 be aware that it leaks out the rubber faster - so your tire will go flat in, say, 2 days as opposed to, say, 4.... I use CO2 on the road and top up with air the next day.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
11/5/07 12:02 A

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I have worked in bike shops and never once heard of an complaints. All the time I have used it I have not had any problems using CO2. Well I am guessing that someone had a bad tube or just bad experiences. Anyway you look at it the CO2 is probably the easiest way to get a tube filled up on the road. Obviously the floor pump is the greatest way while at home.
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MTNBIKENV's Photo MTNBIKENV SparkPoints: (0)
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11/4/07 11:40 P

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I've used CO2 for goodness knows how many flats, and it never seemed to differ at all when it comes to leaking out.

Marnie
RENO, NEVADA

A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
11/4/07 11:29 P

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I don't see how CO2 would leak out any faster then air but either way after the ride you should check your pressure anyway. CO2 is not necessarily going to fully fill up the tire past 110 PSI. Any fix on the road is always a quick or temp fix. When you get home you should do a real fix or take your bike to a shop if you can't do it yourself. Good luck in all your rides.
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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
10/30/07 3:39 P

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Interesting point about CO2 losing pressure faster than air. I'll remember that. I love my CO2 pump, though! I also have a frame pump, but don't usually carry it on short or local rides. Only if I am doing something long and unsupported.

WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
10/30/07 9:33 A

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Quick addition to SPARTY and TRUEFALCON's points about pumps.

Definitely get a floor pump and a frame pump - I have a floor pump with a pressure gauge and it's a total godsend. SO much easier to inflate tires and you know what PSI you're running. I check my tire pressure and top up every couple of days or so (I run 32c cross tires).

On the road I have a minipump and CO2, which for me is the best of both worlds - I use the mini to inflate the inner tube before mounting into the tire and also for the initial inflation and seating, and then switch to CO2 to get up to about the right PSI. Also if you're like me and have an annoying tendency of fumbling the CO2 cartridge, then you've got a backup! If you do use CO2, it leaks out faster than air so check tire pressure the next day.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
10/29/07 11:23 P

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OK I forgot something and TrueFalcon brought it to light. A second pump for the bike frame is sometimes a pain in the rear. I recommend using a CO2 pump. Usually a bike hand pump is hard to use in that it is pretty hard to pump a tire up to 90 PSI or so. I have one that says it can pump up to about 100 PSI and I can't get it there even with all the strength that I have. The patch is good to use too. If you don't have one then there is another couple of choices. The first is to take a plastic baggy and place it between the tire and tube. This isn't too realistic in it's use but sometimes that is all you have. I bring an extra dollar or two so that I can fold it and then place it where the hole is. This is a more sure save. If you want to support it a little more then put it in a baggy. I also carry one spare tire and at least two spare tubes. I don't like carrying patches with me and I would rather just replace the tube with a new one. Ok that is just about it. The last thing I need to say is that if you buy a CO2 pump then you can usually buy the replacement cartridges from a hardware store at a cheaper price. I know that Performance Bike Shop has an online store that carries the pumps that use a cage form to keep the cartridges in place. I have put one in mine two years ago and it is still sealed and full of CO2. Well that is enough from me. Good luck.

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SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
10/29/07 11:01 P

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I check my pressure before every ride. If you pump says that the pressure is there and the tires are firm then it is not the pump. If they go flat within a day or two then there is something wrong with your tire and/or tube. I wold look first to the tube. If you can go a few days without your bike then I would recommend that you take the tube out and fill it up with some pressure so that it is about three inches in diameter, I'm not sure the circumference so I'm stuck with using the diameter. Ok so there are two options from here. The first is probably the easiest. Let it sit around and do nothing with it for a few days. If it goes flat or gets smaller then there is a problem with the tube. The second is to drop it into some water like your tub or a kiddy pool. If you see bubbles coming off the tube in succession then there is again a problem with the tube. Ok either way if you find something wrong with your tube then check your tire. There may or may not be a small puncture. Look around the inside since it is slicker there and would probably be either a sticker (misc pointy object) or a hole from a puncturing object.
Ok now here is my secret weapon in the war on finding problems in a tube and tire. When you remount your tire and tube remember the stem. Now if you don't know the stem is it is where you put the air in the tube. On all tires there are stickers or paint to tell you about the tire. You want to line these two up when you mount the tire and tube. Here you may be asking yourself what will this do to help me? If you ever have another flat it will be a tell tail in finding injuries to the tire and tube. It is usually easier to find the the hole in a tube. When you find it you can go however far from the stem and then go to the tire and go the same distance down the tire. I hope that this as clear in the reading as it is in my mind. I have used this trick for years to help me keep track of any puncture I may have. I have thankfully only used it once on my own bike. To all who may read this I hope it helps you too. Good luck and God's speed.

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FALCONFLEWAWAY Posts: 133
10/29/07 10:40 P

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You should get two pumps - a floor pump and a frame mount pump.

The floor pump will inflate your tires with much less effort. Just use the frame pump for on-the-road repairs.

.... Oh, by the way, you *do* carry a spare tube and a little box of Park Pre-Glued Super Patch (part # GP-2) in your seat bag, don't you ???

BILLIEBUNNY19's Photo BILLIEBUNNY19 Posts: 452
10/29/07 3:35 P

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Thanks y'all. I'll have to buy a new bike tire pump.

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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
10/29/07 11:10 A

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I check air pressure every other ride, or at least once a week.

MTNBIKENV's Photo MTNBIKENV SparkPoints: (0)
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10/29/07 9:57 A

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On my road bike, I check air pressure every other ride, if I'm riding daily. I keep the pressure at 110. The mtn bike is different.. it does not lose pressure as quickly, though I still do check regularly and make adjustments in pressure depending on the riding I'll be doing on it that day.

If your tire(s?) is/are going FLAT every couple of days, you have a slow leak.

Edited by: MTNBIKENV at: 10/29/2007 (09:58)
Marnie
RENO, NEVADA

A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

FALCONFLEWAWAY Posts: 133
10/28/07 8:59 P

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Road bikes with high pressure tires do need pumping more often because they use thinner rubber in the tubes to make them light and lively.

With narrow tires there is a great danger of bending a rim if the tires get too soft.

I pump the tires on my Madone to 110 every two days.

Edited by: FALCONFLEWAWAY at: 10/28/2007 (21:01)
BILLIEBUNNY19's Photo BILLIEBUNNY19 Posts: 452
10/28/07 7:09 P

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Unrealated bike maintenence question: My tires seem to go flat at least once a week it's like every three days! How often should I be airing them up for a regular bike? Is this normal?

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SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
9/25/07 9:08 A

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K: I like to use Natural Orange or another citric type of cleaner. You have to water it down a bit but all in all it's a great degreaser. It can also help you with your cleaning in other parts of the house.
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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
9/14/07 3:41 P

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Soap and water mainly.... I generally wash my bike every 2-3 weeks (or everytime I take it off-road, the beauty of a cross bike). My routine looks something like this:

1) Clean chain
2) Remove wheels, set aside
3) Sponge soapy water onto frame
4) Clean deraillurs and front chainring
5) Hose off bike (water should dribble out of hose)
6) Dry
7) Degrease and clean rear cogs
8) Clean rims
9) Lube (not chain)
10) Reassemble bike
11) Lube chain

Generally takes me about 45 minutes, all told. For day-to-day cleaning (e.g. after riding through puddles or drizzle or some such) I'll wipe dry with a rag, check drivetrain (clean if necessary) and polish frame with Pledge (avoiding rims, pedals and brakes).

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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9/14/07 1:59 P

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What do you guys use to clean the dirt and grime off the frame of your road bike?

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
9/12/07 10:14 A

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Good job on the fix! Feels good to do it yourself, doesn't it?

SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
9/9/07 1:15 A

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TC: Way to go on fixing your bike. I hope you don't jump in over your head fixing your BF's bike. Good luck if you decide to go at it. Remeber the saying,
"If is ain't, don't fix it." :D
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TMMYCAT05's Photo TMMYCAT05 Posts: 777
9/8/07 6:24 P

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thanks for the tips everyone!! i fixed the problem this afternoon... i'm so proud of myself! i'm pretty sure that this sound was my chain rubbing against the next chain ring in the back. i did a lot of different things, not sure which one fixed it but it was all useful to learn! :) now i know all about my shifting cable and the limit screws and the knob in front to fine-tune it. after a long afternoon of tinkering with it, now my bike is shifting smoother than it was when i got it back from the LBS's tune-up. :-) i might even adjust my boyfriend's gears next!!

Edited by: TMMYCAT05 at: 9/8/2007 (20:04)
FALCONFLEWAWAY Posts: 133
9/8/07 5:34 P

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TmmyCat - I agree with the others - it's likely an out of adjustment cable. However, since you didn't mention spontaneous shifting, I'm inclined to think the rear derailleur is too far in and the chain is tapping the next bigger sprocket.

These mechanical things need constant attention however. Yesterday I heard a slight click in 7th gear on the rear - I stopped without shifting it and from behind the bike I looked close and the derailleur pulley was slightly inside the line of the 7th sprocket - a quarter turn of the adjuster clockwise to let the derailleur move out and all was well again.

These things will never be totally quiet because it is metal on metal after all. One thing that will make noise even when it's properly adjusted is a worn out chain - if you measure 24 links, a new chain is EXACTLY 12 inches - when it's an 1/8" over, the chain is worn out and the sprockets should be looked at too. You might want to check this as well.

SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
9/7/07 3:03 P

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W: Where have you been hiding? I was looking for your posts but I didn't see any on here. I hope all is going well for you and it's nice to see you posting again. :D
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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
9/7/07 1:21 P

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SPARTY has good points so I won't repeat them but it sounds like it's cable stretch on the rear derailleur to me. I had that recently and my rear derailleur would spontaneously upshift when I rode over bumps or accelerated hard. I tightened up the cable (there should be a knob either on the derailleur or along the cable running to it) that you can turn to adjust tension. A couple of half-turns fixed it for me.

If you have a new bike, you should take it back to the LBS after a couple of months and get all the cables etc. looked at as things will stretch.

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

If God invented marathons to keep people from doing anything more stupid, the triathlon must have taken Him completely by surprise.
-P.Z. Pearce

Specificity, specificity, specificity.
-Andy Coggan

The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
- Frank Kotsonis


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SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
9/7/07 12:19 P

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TC: Ok there are a few things that can be a problem here. I'm not following your post exactly so Im' just going to start at the beginning and break it down from there. If I have a little over-kill please skip what you don't need.
Ok first you don't want to be in the small chain ring in the front and the smallest gear in the rear. This goes for the big chain ring in the front and the largest gear in the rear. Those are two things that you want to avoid. They cause chain strain and may be part of the cause for clicking. They also have a tendancy to pull the derailleur in a direction contrary to where you have it. This will create a clicking sound as the chain pulls it out of place and the tension of the cable will pull it back into place.
Ok so if that isn't your problem then it's all about the tension of the cable. Sometimes a small adjustment will make all the difference. I had a cable that kept jumping and all I had to do was adjust it on the top and bottom and a small 1/8 turn fixed the middle. This could be something that you could do or a bike shop may do it for free or a small cost.
The last thing that I can think of is the derailleur hanger is bent. I had this happen to me too and I could look down and see the chain rolling over top of the cassette like it going in between gears and then it would seat again on a gear. It got really annoying and I finally had to stop by my budding bike shop for the tool to bend the hanger back into place. This could be a small bend but cause a huge problem! My hanger wasn't even out of place 1/4 at the very tip but it really messed up my alignment.
Ok these are some of the things that you should look into. If anything you do makes it worse or doesn't fix the problem contact your shop and ask for a little help. Usually it's something small that creates the problems. Good luck and I hope your problems are solved.
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TMMYCAT05's Photo TMMYCAT05 Posts: 777
9/7/07 11:30 A

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hmmm, that is good to know for future reference ... i don't have a computer on this bike though ... is there something else that could cause a clicking sound back there? it happens when (left gear shifter is in gear 2 and right gear shifter is in gear 2 or 3) OR (left gear shifter is in gear 1 and right gear shifter is in gear 2). i will try to figure out a way to reproduce it at home when i'm not on my bike...that might help me tell exactly where the sound is coming from. maybe i could put the bike on my car rack and pedal forward with my hands.

DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
9/7/07 10:29 A

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My first question would be about your speed computer. Do you have a rear mount? If your spped computer is mounted on your rear wheel, it could be that it got moved as you were cleaning your chain, and is now "clicking" against the sensor as the wheel rotates. Easy to fix: just move the frame mounted part slightly away from the wheel. Make sure it can still read the sensor, but no longer makes direct contact with it. That's been my problem when I get a clicking noise from the rear of my bike, especially after fixing a flat on the rear tire.

TMMYCAT05's Photo TMMYCAT05 Posts: 777
9/6/07 9:09 P

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I do have an REI store in my area. I need to check it out!

Hey I have another bike maintenance question. I got my chain all clean and lubed and my gears are shifting much smoother now. (yay!) But when I am in certain gears, I always notice a constant, fast clicking noise coming from the general vicinity of the rear wheel or rear derailleur or somewhere in there. Does anyone know what causes this and what can I do to fix it? I would love to be able to fix it myself.



DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
8/30/07 10:01 A

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Oh, that is awesome! I wish I had a skill like that I could trade...

I have a Trek, and Giant has a great reputation, too. If you list the other brands they carry, I am sure you'll get some feedback there too.

Do you have an REI store in your area? They do some great clinincs--some basic, for free; others more in depth, that you pay for. The guys at your LBS would probably be willing to walk through changing a tire with you, too, as long as you go when they are not busy. Especially if you get a bbike from them. It never hurts to ask!

TMMYCAT05's Photo TMMYCAT05 Posts: 777
8/29/07 4:18 P

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oh a free one! lol. that makes me think twice about paying for this class. it is $195 for 4 classes. i guess i could just watch youtube videos for free, i already saw one about how to change a tire and i'm planning to try it out as soon as i get the supplies.

my local bike shop owner is cool... he might let me do his website in exchange for a bike! :) i am excited. he only carries trek and giant and some other brands that i haven't heard of. i am thinking about a trek pilot.

DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
8/29/07 4:12 P

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I took a clinic on easy maintanence. The first thing they said was not to use WD40.

Basically, spray a chain cleaner (you can find all sorts at the LBS) in the chain, wipe it off. Then go back and put ONE DROP of lube on each link of chain. Not so much you'll gather dirt, but enough to keep in running smoothly.

The clinic at your LBS sounds great. REI stores usually have clinics every month, too. And the basic clinics are free.



SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
8/25/07 8:10 P

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T: There you go! Hands on training is the best way to go. If you are still stuck after that check out bicycling.com They have a book on maintanence and repair. I have a copy of it and use it whenever I get stuck. I'm looking to maybe go back to wrok for my friend at his shop. He has been into bikes since way before I came back to them. I'm looking to pick up some advanced tips on bike repair. I have learned most of what I know through making mistakes and hard knocks. I did learn a few things from my shop buddies when I was working there. They gave me a few tips but I was usually stuck on the floor and couldn't work the shop as much as I wanted too. Well I hope you learn a lot at your class.
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TMMYCAT05's Photo TMMYCAT05 Posts: 777
8/25/07 7:21 P

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thanks for this tips everyone! this is all very helpful info. i think i am going to take a bike repair class at the LBS in january and learn more about bike maintenance and repair.

SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
8/25/07 10:12 A

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M1: Thank you. I can see where you might want a quick fix for something. I go by the standing that when it comes to road repairs then it's anything goes. However, when it comes to "maintenance" then it should be done in the method to keep up or make it last as long as it can. I generally avoid anything that can cause harm. If I learn that one of my old techniques is creating a hazard then I stop and pass on the information. Either way I'm sure you had positive intentions and I thank you for putting out tips to our fellow riders. Good luck meeting your goals.
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MOBILE1 SparkPoints: (0)
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8/25/07 8:49 A

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Some very good points. I was thinking along the lines of a quick fix but for regular maintenance you are right.

SPARTYJR3000's Photo SPARTYJR3000 Posts: 629
8/25/07 1:13 A

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T: I would like to give you some words of caution. There are great ideas on here but some could be hazardous to your bike.
The first thing I would warn you against is using WD-40. It's ok to use it to lube metal or certain machinery but I would not want to use it on a chain. It contains hazardous chemicals that will break down the seals in the chain. If my motorcycle chain gets overly lubed I might use it but there are better products out there. I also avoid using a brush on the chain since it may push the dirt further into the chain. I would usually use a rag and sometimes Q-tips if I'm really feeling frisky.
If you insist on using a hose then be very careful of how much pressure you use and where you spray. I think someone already mentioned it but it can get water into your BB or into the wheel hub and cause bad things to happen. You will never even see it coming until it is too late. I had to rebuild a BB that had water in it. I thankfully got the bike for free but the stuff I had to fix really took a lot of time. If I were to use a hose then I use a multi-function spray handle and set it to mist. This will get the parts wet but not put any serious pressure on the bike. There are higher levels of pressure that you can use but I don't like using a hose and I do pretty much everything by hand with a rag.
I love Natural's Orange for cleaning. It's all natural and generally save on the bike. It is best to water it down since it works so well and it's best to conserve when you can.
Now for the lube itself, well that's really a personal choice and depends on riding environment. I pretty much stick to the Tri-Flow Teflan formula. It's great in all types of environments and doesn't gunk up. White lightning works ok and is cheap but is really heavy. I had their wax version for a little while but ended up getting rid of it cause it felt too slow. Pedro makes good stuff too but I think it is over priced where I shop.
Again there are many good brands out there and I would say take one of the three mentioned here. If you like you could always try them all. Some LBS will let you choose your lube and they will put it on for you. That way you can get a feel for some different brands. Good luck to you when you finally decide on your brand.

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MTNBIKENV's Photo MTNBIKENV SparkPoints: (0)
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8/24/07 6:22 P

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I only use Tri Flow.. I hose the bike down, dry, apply the tri flow then wipe off the excess. Works great for us, no issues. I have to wash my mtn bike down after every ride.. we are extremely dusty here. The really fine stuff. Gets into everything.

Marnie
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A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

MAGELLAN1's Photo MAGELLAN1 Posts: 550
8/24/07 5:09 P

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just be sure not to spray water with much force into your hub, that could cause you some problems. i have used "simple green" that works pretty well. wipe your chain dry then add lube to it-white lightning, pedros, w2



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ABIKER's Photo ABIKER Posts: 981
8/24/07 2:46 P

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Pedro's makes a good line of products. I like to use Pedro's chain cleaner. www.pedros.com





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8/24/07 1:26 P

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A stiff brush with some hot soap and water is one of the easiest methods. You can get a special chain cleaner and solution at the bike shop but that can be a bit expensive @ $50.00. WD-40 is also good for loosening up the grease. White Lightening is an excellent product that you can get at a bike shop to use on your chain afterwards instead of oil. It is a wax substance that comes off with the dirt so your chain stays lubed and cleaned at the same time.

TMMYCAT05's Photo TMMYCAT05 Posts: 777
8/24/07 12:57 P

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how do you clean your chain and rear derailleur?
mine is all gunked up from riding on a dirt path today, and it is acting weird when i change gears. skipping gears, spontaneously shifting, not catching on the new gear etc.

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