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TOPIC:   First Spill 


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DRC2205
DRC2205's Photo Posts: 8,845
8/14/07 1:40 P

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Yeah, other bikers are nice that way (LOL!) They'll always laugh, just to make you feel at ease. Really. That's why. Well, and being glad it's you and not them who just fell...



CAPEJOHN
CAPEJOHN's Photo Posts: 95
8/11/07 12:42 P

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Welcome to biking. We all fall now and then at stops. The good AND bad about falling is that it usually happens when there are lots of people around. They can help, like the guy you met, but mostly, (when they see you are not hurt), they laugh. Especially other bikers.

Your freedom of speech is earned by allowing others their freedom of speech.


 


WONGERCHI
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8/10/07 10:38 A

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LOL, I think everyone who has gone clipless has had one of those embarassing low-speed traffic light tipovers.... Fortunately for me I used the bonnet of a car to steady myself while I wrenched my other foot out of the clip!

I also unclip and have a foot loose if I know I'm going to stop - now all I have to do is remember to fall the right way...

In God we trust, all others bring data.
- W. Edwards Demings

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Specificity, specificity, specificity.
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The plural of "anecdote" is not "data".
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ROBYN1007
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8/8/07 5:40 P

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Thanks for the welcome! I do the same thing with unkleating now. I took up cycling last summer after my first ski season back in Colorado was over. I knew that without skiing I'd be bored out of my mind!

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SPARTYJR3000
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8/8/07 4:30 P

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R: Welcome to the team. You shouldn't feel bad about a spill. I'm pretty sure that everyone that has ever rode on a bike has had a spill. What you experienced is actually pretty common. I have heard so many stories about people forgetting that they are locked in. I like to unkleat when I think that I might have to stop or I let a foot hang loose when I'm gradually slowing down.

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ROBYN1007
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8/8/07 4:18 P

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Okay, reading this thread has made me feel a lot better about my crash when I was learning to use my clipless pedals. It was the first time out with them and I had driven to my starting spot. I got my front wheel on, started off and looked down and realized I hadn't connected the front brake. I quickly stopped to reconnect but forgot that I was clipped in. Oops, over I went. Haven't done that since but I tend to be pretty cautious and unclip early.

As far as WSD bikes, one of the things that is different about mine is the brake handles are slightly closer to the handlebar. I have pretty weak hands from tendonitis so this really helps me get better leverage when I need it for downhill and such.

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SPARTYJR3000
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8/8/07 3:40 P

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M: POISON IVY, YIKES! I hope you are better now. That really sounds dreadful! it actually reminded me of a spill I had when I was a kid. I was riding w/ my X-girlfriend (she had just broken up w/ me earlier so I had no choice but to ride back w/ her) on the sidewalk headed for home. I saw another biker coming at us (the wrong way even if he was on the sidewalk) so I nicely moved off the walk and onto the grass since I had a mountain bike. Then just as we were about to pass I realized that there was a dip in the ground and it was pretty serious. I coudn't move back onto the walk because the bad biker was between us and there were huge trees on the right. So with no room I hoped for the best and got the worst. My bike was ruined and not worth repair and I flew way over my handle bars. Well we ended having to walk up a little way and call my mom to come get us. I think that was probably the worst crash I have ever had. Since then I haven't broken any bikes but I have managed to dent a few parts here and there or bend them out of place.

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MOGCHILD
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8/8/07 3:10 P

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Had an okay spill on my mtn bike a few weeks back. Endo'ed and came away with a few scrapes and bruises. No big deal. Went about my ride as though nothing happened. Two days later, every place where there were scrapes on my left elbow/shoulder had turned into poison ivy! Blisters! Oozing! GACK!!!

Funny thing is that I ALWAYS wash up with cold water and pumice hand cleaner after every ride, but on this occasion I had not bothered. Jumped right into a warm shower, which is the WORST thing to do. Lesson learned the hard way!


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SPARTYJR3000
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8/7/07 12:21 P

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D: I have spend time looking at the WSD bikes and for the most part I have found that most women fit fine on the general fit bike. I have fitted many women on bikes and usually their structure has enabled them to stick to the general fit and be more comfortable then they would on the WSD. I don't have anything against them and I'm very happy that they have been created. One day I hope to see more bikes made to fit. I know that it is really expensive now but it may be that more people will open up that style of shop. I hope that your LBS is taking good care of you. I like to find the smaller shops that remember who I am and are more willing to take time paying attention to what I need instead of looking at the cookie cutter aproach. I appreciate your information. You are right about the geometry of a women and a WSD bike trying to better aproach the fit.

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DRC2205
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8/7/07 10:24 A

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WSD bikes are designed towards a woman's frame, as compared to a man. The geometry of the bike is different, to compensate for the torso and leg lengths which tend to be different. The rake of the front wheel is also different. It is not so much a height thing, although they do start slightly smaller (50 cm instead of 52/53 cm) and don't go quite as large. At 5'7", you could proabably do either. My LBS suggested I stick with a general frame, since I could fit one easily and was comfortable.



SPARTYJR3000
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8/4/07 10:32 A

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I sold my old TT bike which I didn't really ride that often because I never really had a flat area to ride and it had 650s. I had read storys and studies about 650s being quicker and easy to get going. The one thing that I learned in physics is that it is harder to go faster on smaller wheels. Next thing I have to go over with my professor is if the smaller cranks help out or not.
I do know for sure that most people do not bring 650 stuff usually. It is really rare to see anybody using them now except for people with women specific designed bikes. All the time I sold bikes and worked in the bike shop I really didn't see that many bikes with them come in or go out. I actually avoided selling them to women unless they really needed it because of their shape and size. I'm glad that the fad for 650s is over. They really were not necessary and didn't really do much good.

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KJEANNE
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8/2/07 3:27 P

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I just learned something! I had no idea the WSD bikes have smaller wheels. What is the height range for a WSD? I’m curious. I stand 5’7” so I’m sure it wouldn’t apply to me.

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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DRC2205
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8/2/07 11:56 A

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Yes, WSD stands for "women's specific design" and has 650's. Everyone else on the ride had 700's or else a couple of hybrids. That was actually one of the reasons my LBS recommended I go with a standard frame instead of a WSD--after the first flat, I could still find help on the road!



SPARTYJR3000
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8/1/07 12:16 P

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D: That's pretty cool that you guys were able to help her out. WSD is woman's sized bike? I'm guessing that she had 650s on her bike. Is that right?
I went on a group ride one time that went wrong real fast. I think I only made it about 5 miles. It all started before I left. I forgot to eat breakfast so I went out hungry and I was a little late. (I forgot to mention that I had just rebuilt my bike after doing a lot of travel with it so I hadn't fine tuned it yet) Then when I got out I got tired real fast but was able to hang in there despite also forgeting to bring extra water. Thankfully one of the other riders gave me a bar to eat. Of course my kleet wasn't set right on one foot and the other was lose which almost got stuck in the pedal. Then there were things loose, etc. Well I finally had to pull off and call my wife to come pick me up. It was pretty bad overall. I now make sure that my bike is tuned up before I go out on a ride.

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DRC2205
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8/1/07 11:01 A

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I may not bring a lot of gear, but I always have what's needed to change a flat. I was on a group ride recently with someone who got a flat. She'd brought everything to change a tire--and left it in her car. And since she was on a WSD bike, the wheel size was different than what the rest of us had. Fortunately, someone in the group had a spouse nearby waiting for them to finish the ride, so they picked up this poor woman and drove her and her bike the 5 miles back to her car.



SPARTYJR3000
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7/27/07 4:01 P

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I thougth I would relay an almost spill situation that I had. I had a green light and was going through when a mini-van almost when through her stop and came very close to hitting me! I was obviously mad when I had to hit my brakes and almost bit it just next to her van. So after doing a small amount of yelling about watching the light and showing her where her stop line was I rode off. After going about 20 feet down a hill I realized that my rear tire was flat. I'm not sure if it happened just before the near miss (my bike stopped roughly) or right at that moment. Either way I was just over two miles away from my home. I was on my way from school and it was only about three miles one way so I never carried spare gear. Since my tire was flat I wasn't going to ride home and I was forced to carry my backpack and all my stuff plus my bike for the remaining distance. Let me tell you that I don't go anywhere w/o my extra gear any more. I have learned most of what I know from the mistakes that I have made on the road.

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REBCCA
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7/21/07 8:18 P

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KJeanne, I did utilize the grass for a cleaning tool and did still have plenty of grease on my hands for the ride home. You are fun!

I found an easy way to secure my bike in the trunk of my little sports car with neoprene protecting the contact points. It is less than a mile to a shady parking spot by the bike trail but saves me a steep ride uphill to get home. With temperatures in the high 90's I am not into uphill grades of over 15 degrees. It was so delightful to ride the trails next to a creek with big shade trees. I am loving this bicycling activity.


Edited by: REBCCA at: 7/22/2007 (11:19)
...where attention goes, energy flows...


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DRC2205
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7/19/07 1:54 P

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It has been a rough TdF, hasn't it? Now if I can only find someone to come by and replace my bike after a nasty fall, I'd be set!



DYMONDY2K
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7/18/07 7:01 P

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Plus if your shorts are torn and bloody you look just like most of the riders in this years TdF!

9/1/2008 280 lbs.

Goal #1 12/31/2008 250 lbs
Goal #2 03/31/2009 230 lbs
Goal #3 06/31/2009 210 lbs
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KJEANNE
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7/18/07 2:03 P

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REBCCA
You not suppose to clean off the grease but proudly display it. Just wipe your hands on your shorts (now you know why most are back!) to get most of it off and keep on riding. I also rug my hands in the grass If handy, to get most of the grease off.
Glad you weren’t hurt too bad with your fall.


Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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REBCCA
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7/18/07 1:18 P

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I've had my bike for one month today and took my first spill today with blood, scrapes and a chain that fell off. Picking myself and finding a shade tree I was able to get the chain back on and ride home with lots of grease on my hands.
I will add hand wipes to my emergency kit. emoticon

...where attention goes, energy flows...


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JOEL_CORY
JOEL_CORY's Photo Posts: 14
7/11/07 10:00 P

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I have two sets of wheels that are tubulars, but I never ride them daily. One set on my track bike. One on my old set of racing wheels. I've even been tempted to buy new rims and re-build the wheels with clincher rims just because I don't see the significant advantage anymore.

2007 Bike Outside Challenge: 2600 miles. Miles done: 1092


 
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DYMONDY2K
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7/11/07 7:31 P

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People still use tubulars? This was 20 years ago when I was riding on them and I moved to clinchers as soon as I could.

9/1/2008 280 lbs.

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FALCONFLEWAWAY
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7/11/07 6:31 P

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Tubulars - I remember those ... rode them for 20 years - '71 to '91. I've been riding clinchers since and think they are superior to tubs for general riding.

I did a little checking ...

My tires (Continental Attack front and Force rear) cost $74 for both and weigh 190 and 210 grams f & r. The tubes are 100 gm each. 300 grams per wheel ...

A comparable tubular from Continental is about 270 grams ... hmmm. 30 grams is one ounce. Also, these cost $90 EACH.

Then I check wheels - mine (Bontrager Race X on a Trek) are about 1700 grams total - comparable quality tubular wheels are about 1500 ... 200 grams is about 7 ounces.

So you can save about 9 ounces total. Most people can't notice that and it makes little difference unless you are riding a track bike or in a criterium where acceleration is all important.

For that, you get tires that cost more, wear out faster, puncture more easily. I used to repair sew-ups - it took more than a hour and was difficult and if you didn't get it right you had to unsew the tire and do it all over. I can repair a tube in 5 minutes. On the road, I only replace them, I patch at home. And you can test the tube before reusing it!

Clinchers are safer - I've rolled a couple of tubs after replacing one on the road and not regluing it. Not fun. To properly glue them you are supposed to do a process that takes about 4 days per wheel - so you need more than one wheel set to do it right.

There are recent studies that show clinchers have lower rolling resistance because tubs move around a bit in the glue.

Handling advantages are slight, maybe not at all. My Attack & Force tires are racing tires and their performance and handling is the best I've ever had !!

Edited by: FALCONFLEWAWAY at: 7/11/2007 (18:36)


KJEANNE
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7/9/07 5:16 P

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JOEL_CORY
Glad you’re okay after the spill but look on the bright side! Now you have an excuse to upgrade your wheel set!


Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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JOEL_CORY
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7/9/07 2:33 P

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I got jinxed with all this talk about crashing. emoticon
I went for a fantastic ride this weekend up Highway 9 in Santa Cruz to the summit, and down Bear Creek road. Everything was great, until I glanced back just long enough to look forward and see a large rock, think squared off soccer ball, wham! Dented my front wheel, went over the bars, and ended up with a few scrapes on my leg, arm and a bruised knee. I had to ride the next 15 miles back to the car with no front brake.

My ego was bruised worse than my bike, but that front wheel will never be the same.

Edited by: JOEL_CORY at: 7/9/2007 (14:34)
2007 Bike Outside Challenge: 2600 miles. Miles done: 1092


 
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RUNCANTRELL
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7/9/07 12:43 P

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Yeah, I rode again yesterday and my left clip definitely needs to be loosened. A couple of times it took several tries to get my foot out, but fortunately this time I always planned ahead and started going through the process long before I needed to stop.



MTNBIKENV
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7/9/07 9:52 A

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Wasn't that long ago that I went clipless. Keeled over twice in the bike shop parking lot when I was trying to practice. Wound up getting a date with the shop mechanic because of that, and have been with him since. LOL

Thankfully often when you do have issues and take a fall, you are going slow or have stopped and simply tip over. Not always the case, but often. I had them adjust mine when I first started, so they were very loose. Since then I've fallen twice, both on the mtn bike,and both up VERY steep, very rocky/sandy climbs. Didn't even get a scratch. Just keep practicing. I'd practice at maybe a park or empty lot with a lot of grass. Anywhere away from traffic, rocks, gravel etc. Clip and unclip, over and over and over again.



Marnie
RENO, NEVADA

A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for.



KJEANNE
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7/7/07 10:35 P

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Take a look at your pedals for two small, Philips head screws that can be turned to adjust the tension. Turn to the right to tighten to the left to make it easier to unclip.

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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RUNCANTRELL
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7/7/07 10:14 P

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Sounds like I need to have some adjustments made. I will look into it. Thanks for all the tips! And I sure I hope I never go head over handlebars! I did that once when I was 10 (long before the days of helmets) and suffered a concusion and broken arm.



MAGELLAN1
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7/7/07 9:57 P

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i used to use toe straps, but a couple years ago switched to clipless on my road bike and just this year on my mountain bike. I use SPD pedals/clips, and have them adjusted as loose as they can go. its easy to clip in and out that way.

i am good at it on my road bike, but tend to unclip at some technical sections on the mountain bike due to fear (of falling into rocks or into a ravine : )

i think haveing the tension loose is key, but also unclipping a little ahead of time until you get comfortable is a great idea.

good luck!



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DYMONDY2K
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7/7/07 5:04 P

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*OUCH* The header has always been my biggest fear!

9/1/2008 280 lbs.

Goal #1 12/31/2008 250 lbs
Goal #2 03/31/2009 230 lbs
Goal #3 06/31/2009 210 lbs
Goal #4 09/31/2009 195 lbs
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GOOGRL
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7/6/07 10:21 P

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I haven't tried clips yet for this very reason! I think it's too ingrained in me to just step down off the pedal.
At any rate, I took my first header over the handle bars a couple weeks ago. No road rash (love those gloves!), just a few bruises from the collision. It felt good to get the first one out of the way...at least now I won't be so gun shy about bailing off the bike.
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Edited by: GOOGRL at: 7/6/2007 (22:21)


1234MOM
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7/6/07 8:33 P

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RUNCANTRELL you say you can get out of one pedal easier than the other. You can adjust the ease with which the shoe releases. I'd suggest that you do that with the foot you like to release first!

¸.•´¸.•*´¨) ¸.•*¨) ¸.•*¨)
(¸.•´ (¸.•´ *Linda¸.•*¨)
2011




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CHRISSMITH
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7/6/07 7:27 P

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Cracked two ribs at Tsali's Mouse Branch trail in Western NC couple weeks ago. Most of the time the clipless pedals dramatically improve your cycling performance...but every once in a while they'll get you. Of course if you ride like I do, you are likely to eat the trail occasionally regardless of pedal type.

"If everything is under control, you are going too slow." Mario Andretti




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JOEL_CORY
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7/6/07 6:30 P

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Now you're renewing my fear in riding my tubular wheels.

2007 Bike Outside Challenge: 2600 miles. Miles done: 1092


 
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DYMONDY2K
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7/6/07 5:35 P

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You guys aren't instilling confidence in my going 'clipless'

I remember my first real spill. I was coming hard on a left turn signal to make the light, leaned into the turn so I wouldn't lose speed and rolled the tubular. So suddenly I'm sliding on my left leg, bike between my legs right right off the road into the shoulder. I'm bleeding like crazy and look up and there is an ambulance. The guy had pulled over to get something and watched me wreck. So he gets out of the truck and walks over to see if I'm OK, helps bandage me up and sends me on my way. I still laugh at how fortunate I was he was there. Anybody who has ridden with a severe case of road rash knows how much it hurts.

I was never frugal with the glue after that!

9/1/2008 280 lbs.

Goal #1 12/31/2008 250 lbs
Goal #2 03/31/2009 230 lbs
Goal #3 06/31/2009 210 lbs
Goal #4 09/31/2009 195 lbs
Goal #4 12/31/2009 180 lbs


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MORROBAYCHUCK
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7/6/07 4:23 P

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I had a couple of spills in the beginning as well. My first one was unobserved. The second time it happened, I coasted in to a bagel shop patio where there were a bunch of other cyclists already sitting there drinking coffee. I coasted up to the bike rack, and, you guessed it, tipped over right in front of everybody. Saying I was embarrassed is an understatement. I have since gotten so used to the 'clipless' that I don't even think about it any more. Anticipating stops is the key!

Member since 2003



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DRC2205
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7/6/07 2:08 P

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I have clipless pedals, too. When I was learning, I unclipped my foot any time I approached an intersection, whether I planned to stop or not. I could clip back in and continue to pedal if I didn't stop, but if I needed to, I was ready.

I didn't ready Joel's link yet, but the way I was taught is that platform pedals came first. Then then created the cages with the straps, and called them "toe clips" so you toe was stable and you could pedal more efficiently. Then, they invented something that still allowed for an effiecient stroke, but let you get rid of the bulky toe clips: The "clipless" pedal. So that was I you "clip in" to a "clipless" (without the bulky cage) pedal. Does that help, or further confuse things?



ABIKER
ABIKER's Photo Posts: 981
7/6/07 1:34 P

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It takes a little practice to get really comfortable and get the full benefits of being clipped in, but totally worth couple of minor falls. It might be worth it take your bike out into the yard or a grassy area and practice clipping in and out. Starting out in traffic isn't a great idea.

Joel had the best advice.

You fell over on a trainer at the bike shop? That sucks.

~~Adam~~ abiker.blogspot.com
'08 cycling : 0/1500 miles
'08 running: 446/1500 miles





JOEL_CORY
JOEL_CORY's Photo Posts: 14
7/6/07 1:20 P

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Got it. Yeah I guess I'm too old school, I hear clips and think toe clips (http://www.speedplay.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=pedalmuseum.straps).

Try anticipating your stops. As you come to intersections or stop signs, clip out long before you reach the stopping point. You can coast down with your foot resting on the pedal, but not clipped in. The biggest trick is not waiting until the last second to clip out. You can also run drills where every corner you come to you stop, and practice clipping out.

Also, some pedals have a tension adjust. You might be able to loosen the pedal to make it easier to clip out.

You'll get the hang of it.

2007 Bike Outside Challenge: 2600 miles. Miles done: 1092


 
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RUNCANTRELL
RUNCANTRELL's Photo SparkPoints: (19,336)
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7/6/07 1:12 P

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Actually, I was referring to what you are talking about. I thought they are called toe clips, but that is what I have ... the kind that your shoe (special bike shoe) snaps into. I can snap out on my right side pretty easily but have a harder time with my left foot which is the one I step down with.



JOEL_CORY
JOEL_CORY's Photo Posts: 14
7/6/07 12:56 P

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One of the best ways to get used to clips is to start off with the straps a little loose. Then as you get used to the timing, and pulling out the back of the pedal, not out to the side you can start tightening up the straps.

I actually think that going clipless is an easier way to learn for two reasons. First you can get in on both sides (with double sided pedals), and to get out you just twist you foot to the side and put it on the ground just like you do with platform pedals. They're not that expensive, and the shallower learning curve easily makes up for the crashing, and possible broken parts that can arise from getting used to clips and straps.

2007 Bike Outside Challenge: 2600 miles. Miles done: 1092


 
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FRUITYFUL
FRUITYFUL's Photo Posts: 1,002
7/6/07 12:39 P

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Sorry about your spill. I am also considering the clips but was worried about what happened to you. I agree that while cycling out and about, everyone is very helpful if you have stopped or are pulled over. It's a great community to be a part of!

Kristin
Height: 5'7"
Age: 43
Goal: Lose 142 lbs
Lbs lost: 71
71 to go!


 current weight: 263.0 
 
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RUNCANTRELL
RUNCANTRELL's Photo SparkPoints: (19,336)
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7/6/07 12:17 P

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A couple of weeks ago I decided to go for it and put toe clips on my bike. I'd been scared because I am clumsy sometimes and was worried I wouldn't be able to get my foot out. Well, I had straps on my pedals already and found that I had a hard time getting my feet out of those, and nearly rammed into another biker (my sister) when she stopped suddenly and I couldn't get my foot out of the straps.

So when I had the clips put on, I tried them out in the store where they put my bike up on a trainer and I could practice. I felt pretty confident until the trainer came undone and my bike tipped over, me still attached. Not fun, and a HUGE bruise was the result.

Anyway, I went out for my first ride with the toe clips the other day, feeling fairly confident. Although I still have trouble getting my left foot in, I seemed to be able to pop out pretty easily. Until I came to an intersection and saw a car coming. I hadn't slowed down in time and couldn't get my foot out. My options were to continue in the road (not really an option) or tip over. So I tipped, hoping for the best. I didn't get hurt too badly (just a little scrape) but I messed up the break.

Then another biker came along, saw that I was having trouble and stopped to help (which he did quickly). I have been amazed at the comeradery (sp?) among cyclists. A few other times I have stopped and someone always asks if everything is ok.

Just thought I'd share.



 
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