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VALETTE.ANN's Photo VALETTE.ANN SparkPoints: (22,484)
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9/23/07 3:34 P

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I try to always carry my cell and my ID, but sometimes I forget my cell phone. I need to wear more pockets when I ride.

Valette | rhapsodic.org


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EARLYLOIS's Photo EARLYLOIS SparkPoints: (0)
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9/23/07 2:25 P

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Besides ID, I also photocopy my health insurance card. I also have my ICE contacts in my cell phone.

Lois from New Jersey
BRUCEW's Photo BRUCEW Posts: 726
9/22/07 11:44 P

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My emer-kit, has tool, tube an CO2 pump. I also have a small, bandaid kis and carry my cellphone, ID and some form of cash or card. Never know when I might need to buy something.
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“Little drops of water wear down big stones.”
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WONGERCHI's Photo WONGERCHI Posts: 3,889
9/19/07 11:46 A

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QUIXOTICROBOTIC:
Probably the only cycling maintenance skill you need to know is how to change tyres. As KJEANNE said, either ask the LBS to show you, or print out some instructions from the net and practise! I've seen too many people this season walking their bike with a flat. I stopped to help one guy who was walking his bike about 10 miles from his car (and in road shoes, no less) because he didn't know how to change a flat.

I'm still not the fastest flat tyre changer in the world but it takes me 10-15 minutes (generally cos I'm crap at getting the last bit of tyre on the rim and anally retentive about not pinching the tube).

For what it's worth, I have a minipump on my top tube and my seat bag contains the following:

Inner tube in a ziploc full of talc
Patch Kit
$$ (and sometimes cellphone)
Piece of stiff cardboard
Multi-tool
CO2 inflater + 2 canisters

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KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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9/18/07 11:11 A

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QUIXOTICROBOTIC
You might stop by your LBS and ask them to show you how to change a flat. My LBS was happy to show me. I have had lots of practice changing flats since I went for several months where I seemed to have a flat every 2-3 rides!


Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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HEATHERANGELINE's Photo HEATHERANGELINE Posts: 1,370
9/16/07 9:26 P

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I carry an inner tube that fits my bike and a multi-use bike tool.

I do not carry a pump, yet, because I'll need someone to stop and show me what to do with my inner tube anyways. :( I'm learning as fast as I can!

Mother of Angeline (1.5 year)
Boston Qualified Marathoner!
Marathon Maniac 1515


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FALCONFLEWAWAY Posts: 133
9/10/07 3:37 P

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Here's a product by Park tool made just for sidewall blowouts:

should be one line ....
www.parktool.com/products/
detail.asp?cat=17&item=TB%2D2

In Canada, you can get these at Mountain Equipment and most bike stores.

I have one in my seat bag all the time with my spare tubes.

Edited by: FALCONFLEWAWAY at: 9/10/2007 (15:38)
KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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9/10/07 1:39 P

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Here’s a tip (from my Coach) for you bike emergency kit: we all should carry an inner tube; patch kit, pump and/or CO2 but was should also be prepared to a tire sidewall blowout. If you get a cut or gash in your tire sidewall you need to close/cover the hole before you put the new inner tube in. Other wise the inner tube will blow. Here are some stuff you can carry in your emergency kit that can cover the hole:
A folded dollar bill
A 1 ˝ inch square of plastic cut from a milk bottle
Pieces of tire, minus the bead, cut from old tires.

My husband had this happen @ 3 weeks ago during a club ride. I wish I had know about carrying this stuff then!



Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (264,933)
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7/6/07 9:15 A

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DMB777, you are not alone, I read two aliens the first time too.
I look at dial-a-spouse for rescue as giving the opportunity for my man to be a hero.
While I have changed and rotated the tires on cars and installed a new water pump in my swamp cooler I still am not so inclined to change my bike tires. Maybe after I have had her for more than a month I will move into that interest.

"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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DMB777's Photo DMB777 Posts: 38
7/6/07 9:10 A

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I adjust what I take depending on the ride. Cell phone and water are fine for regular 40 minute workouts. I can walk home if something goes wrong with the bike and hit 911 if something goes wrong with me along with the bike.

For longer rides are ones that start away from home, I'll pack CO2, tire levers, a tube, patch kit, Topeak multitool, and basic first aid kit.

DYMONDY2K, it's nice to know that someone else takes the dial-a-spouse approach but I don't think I'd try it if I were more than 15 minutes away from home. The payback level would get too high. I also need to wake up before reading posts. I thought at first that you packed two aliens.



 
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KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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7/5/07 9:10 P

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I always include levers and spare ‘tubes when I ride because, for several months, I seemed to get a flat EVERY time I rode. Boy, am I an expert in changing tires. It’s sooooooooooo empowering. When I ride with my DH, I change his flats too!
But then I change my car flats too!


Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (264,933)
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7/5/07 7:18 P

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DymondY2K, I like your style and attitude.
Congratulations on your successes!
Keep sparking! emoticon

"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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DYMONDY2K's Photo DYMONDY2K Posts: 1,717
7/3/07 2:25 P

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I'm with Rebecca.. I carry my Cell phone and Wallet, Water and a couple of allens in case I need to make an on the fly adjustment. I know the possibility of a flat is there but honestly, Dial-a-wife is faster than me trying to change one out on the road.

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REBCCA's Photo REBCCA SparkPoints: (264,933)
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7/3/07 2:01 P

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Water and a cell phone for my 45 minute beginner rides.

"Learn from nature: See how everything gets accomplished and how the miracle of life unfolds without dissatisfaction or unhappiness."
Eckhart Tolle



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KELOWNAGURL's Photo KELOWNAGURL Posts: 523
6/6/07 1:48 A

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Tube, 2 levers, small pump. Small baggy with debit card, driver's license, and $10. Cell phone. Inhaler. Kleenex - (just can't do snot rockets) and the latest addition, my EpiPen. Rides over 2 hours, I carry a package of Clif shot blocks.

It's never too late to be who you might have been.

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FALCONFLEWAWAY Posts: 133
6/5/07 5:45 P

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I always carry an emergency kit. You can see a picture of the contents of mine in my picture gallery.

Concerning spare tubes: I carry one all the time - I've used it many times. Indespensible.

Patch Kits: Zero of the kind with glue. I only glue tubes at home.

Park tools has "Pre-Glued Super Patch" kit #GP-2 (see pic) These just peel and stick and are great for emergencies. However, since they came out about 15 years ago, I have only ever used one myself - I've used about 5 to rescue other people who had nothing !!

Tire Boot: I bought 2 of these years ago. I used one in 2004. Indespensible. I've still got the other.

Plastic tire levers - mine are made by Trek. Usually I can get the tire off and on by hand alone, but when I can't, these are indespensible.

4, 5, & 6 mm allen wrench. Fits stem clamp, seat post, cable clamps, brake mounts and pads. Indespensible.

Small screwdriver. Adjusts hi-lo screws on derailleurs.

Spoke wrench. I wouldn't travel without it but I know how to true wheels, having built many.

All that weighs just 207 grams and leaves room in the bag for my wallet and cell phone.

If you are a roadie like me, you don't need any of the following:

Chain tool and spare link: If you clean and lube your chain and replace it when 24 links measure 12⅛" (It is exactly 12" when new), your chain will NEVER break. This seeming unfounded claim is based on cycling about 500,000 kilometers in the past 36 years without any chain trouble.

CO2 cartridges - carry a frame pump instead (you can see mine in the pic of the bike) Frame pumps are never empty when you need them; they are endlessly refillable (LOL) and they are better for the environment (and isn't that what biking is supposed to be about???)

Multitools - overkill - just determine what you need for your fasteners and carry only what's needed.

Water bottles - always. (w/water of course)

Extra clothes - depends on your climate and riding style. I only ever wear what I leave home with. Living in Vancouver I have been caught in many a cloudburst and rode home though it - but sea level rainfall is not cold like Calgary's for instance. I actually don't mind riding in the rain. I always wear a helmet and eye protection and that keeps it out of my eyes.

Cell phone always - more for my honey's peace of mind than my own - I know I'm safe - she knows no calls mean I'm ok ;-)

If you are trekking cross-country or backwoods, then you might need to be more of a survivalist, but I can get away nicely being a minimalist.

Style Man in the May Bicycling said, "Those of you who take orgasmic pride in what you call 'being prepared for anything' should start taking care of your bikes at home. Prep your bike instead of larding it up to compensate for your neglect."

FBERG1's Photo FBERG1 SparkPoints: (6,807)
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6/4/07 9:17 P

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Don raises a great point with the flat or broken chain! Just last Thursday my b/f and I had a (humorous) ride from hell. It was our shortest ride of the week, so we thought it would be no problem...

--Spare inner tube and CO2 cartridge - We always carry this, but forgot to include the correct cartridge adapter for the trailer we were towing. When it got a flat tire in the middle of no where, we had to let it roll on the flat for a few hilly miles, off route, to get to a tire shop.
--Chain tool and spare link - About 5 miles from our hotel a link in my chain broke. Luckily the hotel had a shuttle so they picked us up. We've now added the chain tool and a link to our kit.
--Cellphone, $5 emergency money, wallet (ID, insurance card, credit cards)
--Multitool, metal tire levers (I've had too many plastic ones break)
--Chapstick, sunblock, band aids, alcohol wipes
--Rain proof jacket (very thin that rolls up into nothing)
--Energy bars, water

--On short rides (less than 1 hour near home) I typically don't carry most of this as long as I know I can call someone with my cell to pick me up if something breaks or if the weather changes.
--On the longer rides we always bring arm &/or leg warmers since the weather can change in an instant in New England, and a nav system so we can find unexpected things quickly such as a tire or bike shop
--Patch kit - I used to carry one of these but realized I never use it since it seemed easier to just replace the entire inner tube. However, my brother still carries, and uses, a patch kit.

Happy riding!

Edited by: FBERG1 at: 6/4/2007 (21:21)
-Felisa
EARLYLOIS's Photo EARLYLOIS SparkPoints: (0)
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6/3/07 11:34 A

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I also have an I. C. E. contact number on my cell phone.

Lois from New Jersey
VEGGIE_DON's Photo VEGGIE_DON Posts: 86
6/2/07 10:46 P

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I ride trails mostly but around town to run errands and for the daily before work get your heart pumping trips as well. I always wear a camelback hydration pack and in there is always the standard tire repair kit and mutitool and minor first aid stuff as most have described. I have a pump mounted on the frame and I always have a chain break/repair tool. Having a flat or a chain break and pushing your bike home just once will make you a believer. Bikes were meant to ride and not push......I hate pushing it anywhere. If your miles deep in the forest and have to walk out...then you should be backpacking and you wouldn't push a bike on a backpacking trip would you :)

Best of luck!!!! don

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SLIM_STYLISH Posts: 62
6/2/07 7:16 P

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Hi,
I aways carry an emergency kit. In the city its several size bandaids like 4"x4" along with the usual, and alcohol swipes. It's in a case a little larger than a compact disc case.

For tours, I add in things like gauze, surgical tape, surgical scrub, calimine lotion, bug repelent. Guess it's just part of the leadership training from the Sierra Club. I always carry my medical insurance card with I.D. too, along with cell phone and bicycle repair items.

 
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SLIM_STYLISH Posts: 62
6/2/07 7:12 P

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Hi,
I aways carry an emergency kit. In the city its several size bandaids like 4"x4" along with the usual, and alcohol swipes. It's in a case a little larger than a compact disc case.

For tours, I add in things like gauze, surgical tape, surgical scrub, calimine lotion, bug repelent. Guess it's just part of the leadership training from the Sierra Club. I always carry my medical insurance card with I.D. too, along with cell phone and bicycle repair items.

 
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CHRISSMITH's Photo CHRISSMITH Posts: 1,232
5/13/07 7:23 P

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deep trail rider here...I always carry a multitool, tube, cell phone, and CO2 cartridge in my Camelbak. Nothing ruins your day like having to carry your bike 10 miles back out of the best riding trails in the country(I have done this before). I have also had to call for an ambulance to meet me at the parking area in Tsali because some trail warrior severely broke his wrist and needed assistance.

I would especially consider all of these items if you are riding alone.

Chris

"If everything is under control, you are going too slow." Mario Andretti




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TGEARS1's Photo TGEARS1 SparkPoints: (0)
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5/9/07 8:16 A

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When I first started riding long distances I rode without anything but a single water bottle. I just got on the bike and started riding longer and longer. As I progressed I was guided by friends and have started using biking gloves and sun glasses. I've also started to carry a cell phone, camera, patch kit, extra tube, tire iron, multi tool, swiss army knife, CO2 inflator, and pump. On really long rides I'll even load up a pannier with more stuff. I've thought about a small first aid kit but so far have not gotten one. Most of my local rides are in an urban/suburban area and all of the local busses have bike racks so I can get home even with a major breakdown.

Tommy emoticon

 
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KELOWNAGURL's Photo KELOWNAGURL Posts: 523
5/9/07 12:34 A

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No emergency kit here - I stick to the roads. However, I have an underseat bag and I carry two tire levers, a tube and a small pump (between DH and I.) I also carry a debit card and credit card and sometimes some cash, my puffer, cell phone, and kleenex. I don't usually carry ID because DH is with me but I take my driver's license if I'm alone. Sometimes I carry a snack if it's a longer ride (50+ km).

It's never too late to be who you might have been.

Weight goal: 115-120 lbs May 1, 2012?

Check out my blog and podcast for beginning triathletes!
kelownagurl.com


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KESTREL500's Photo KESTREL500 Posts: 1,173
5/8/07 11:11 P

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DRC's mention of the ziploc bag made me think of something...I used to put my id cash etc in a ziploc as well. But in West Marine I found a little airtight box that credit cards, insurance cards cash etc fit into perfectly. I use that now. Also I carry my expired driver's license so that if I do lose the box it'll be one less thing to replace!

My mantra: Exercise frequently! Eat reasonably!


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KJEANNE's Photo KJEANNE SparkPoints: (39,576)
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5/8/07 10:46 P

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Everyone has brought good ideas of what you can bring on your rides. I want to add one thing to the list: A spot person. But that I mean tell someone where you’re going – you entire route – and the times you plan to check in. When I ride alone I always have a spot person. I call them every few hours and tell them where I am and when I will call in again. If I don’t call in on-time my spot person checks in on me.

Do not look where you fell, but where you slipped.
African proverb


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DRC2205's Photo DRC2205 Posts: 8,845
5/8/07 10:40 P

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I carry a spare tube, tire levers, a couple of CO2 cartridges and a pump, a mini multi-tool, and a patch kit in the little bag under the seat. I also carry in my shirt pocket my keys, cell phone, an din a little ziploc bag: some cash, and photocopies of my ID and insurance card. I have to add a copy of my dental insurance information.

If I venture beyond my neighborhood (where I know all the stores!), I take 2 water bottles and at least one munchie--like a protien bar, PB&J or banana.

RHYNIC's Photo RHYNIC Posts: 19,646
5/8/07 4:10 P

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thanks Angel, it appears I will have to invest in one of those.

gail

"Dead Last Finish is greater than Did Not Finish which greatly trumps Did Not Start."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMGatR8SNns

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SbXgQq
bOoU


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F8TH637's Photo F8TH637 Posts: 466
5/8/07 2:10 P

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Gail, you may want to consider investing in a foam roller or like KJEANNE usually recommends, The Stick, so that you can stretch and deep tissue massage your IT Band. You can always go the cheapy way with a rolling pin as well.

- Angel

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RHYNIC's Photo RHYNIC Posts: 19,646
5/8/07 2:03 P

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I just love this thread. Keep asking the questions and i will keep reading the answers.

I am so new to biking. I thought I would take biking up to give my legs a break from the pounding of running. On today's run it appears I have pushed it a little to far and my IT band is causing me trouble. I went on an internet search and read that I should not only stop running but also stop biking.

Someone....please tell that isn't ture...oops, I think I went off topic... SORRY.

gail

"Dead Last Finish is greater than Did Not Finish which greatly trumps Did Not Start."

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xMGatR8SNns

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SbXgQq
bOoU


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DAMIENDUCKS's Photo DAMIENDUCKS Posts: 3,855
5/8/07 1:17 P

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I carry a spare tube, patch kit, small pump, cell phone, ID, and a sturdy lock and bus fare (for those times when I just can't fix things); however, most of my biking is commuting through the city (along trails and on semi-major roads), so as long as I can get home, I can always come back for the bike later.

If I can't be a good example, then I'll just have to be a horrible warning. ~Catherine Aird

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F8TH637's Photo F8TH637 Posts: 466
5/8/07 11:31 A

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I carry a spare tube, tire levers, a mini multi-tool, a patch kit, pepper spray which is attached to my keys, my cell phone, some cash if I have any, my ID and a credit card. I typically have an energy bar waiting in the wings as well.

As someone with bad knees I'd advise you to spare them! I know it's so easy to just keep going especially in the beauty of WV but you don't want to do more harm than good right away. Work yourself up to such distances. Your knees will thank you.

- Angel

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MTNBIKENV's Photo MTNBIKENV SparkPoints: (15,447)
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5/8/07 9:51 A

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I keep it pretty minimum.. on both my road bike and mtn, I usually carry a spare tube and lever and CO2 cartridge, and a multitool if something happens to need adjusting or comes loose or is tweaked in a fall. I keep a phone with me, thankfully I usually have reception even when I'm off in the boonies, and an extra couple of bandaids. I also always have a few bucks with me, even if I have zero intentions of being anywhere where I would need money. I never ever know without a doubt where I will wind up. And I always tell Dave where I think I'll be going.. what road I am on if I am taking the road bike out or what general area I'll be in on the mtn bike. I often go off trail with my mtn bike, so it's not like I can tell him I'm on a certain trail.


That's my usual plan. Oh and I always ALWAYS have some sort of power or health bar with me in case I wind up lost or out longer than I thought. I don't want to bonk and have no food at all available.

Marnie
RENO, NEVADA

A ship is safe in harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

MOUNTAINEERGYRL's Photo MOUNTAINEERGYRL SparkPoints: (0)
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5/8/07 9:33 A

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I was just reading the post about your dental accident - good advice from someone who's been there. Glad you're feeling a little better.

Edited by: MOUNTAINEERGYRL at: 5/8/2007 (09:55)



 
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KESTREL500's Photo KESTREL500 Posts: 1,173
5/8/07 9:27 A

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I don't really venture into the wilderness too much (live in NYC) but here's what I carry. Two spare tubes, patch kit, two tire levers, small multitool, topeak road morph pump (yes for me it has to be this exact pump but for mountain bikers they make a mountain version)and handwipes I also have a very small first aid kit. All this fits in a small under the seat bag.

Don't forget to carry ID, medical AND DENTAL insurance cards.

My mantra: Exercise frequently! Eat reasonably!


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MOUNTAINEERGYRL's Photo MOUNTAINEERGYRL SparkPoints: (0)
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5/8/07 9:06 A

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Hi everyone - Sorry to ask another question right away, but you were all so helpful last time.

Yesterday I hit the trail and couldn't stop. . . the weather was perfect. The trail system here in West Virginia is amazing. Right now I'm staying with a flat trail that follows the river for about 30 miles. It's paved for the first few, but once you leave town it's a finely crushed stone/dirt path. Nothing too challenging terrain-wise. Yesterday I did about 36 miles round trip, which is about double what I've ever done before. I'm sure most of you are used to long distances, but this was overdoing it for the level I'm at and today my kneecaps feel like someone hit me with a baseball bat!

Anyway, for about two hours of my ride (I was taking photos along the way), I was completely alone on the trail. It runs through the woods and it's not uncommon to see deer, turkeys, and some VERY aggressive geese. This is really what keeps me motivated - being alone in nature is very refreshing. But. . . . I'm starting to get worried about the 'what-if's'. What if my tire goes flat? What if something else happens to my bike? Of course I'm without cell phone reception in that area, so there's that concern too. What if I get injured? What other problems am I not thinking of?

I'm sure I can pick up something for tire emergencies at my local sporting goods store, but I was curious to see what others carry with them - if anything - for other emergencies.

Thanks again for all your advice and sorry to bug everyone with the seemingly obvious questions.




 
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Other Cycling - Road, Mountain, Fun, Racing General Team Discussion Forum Posts

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Google Maps adds elevation data for cyclists 5/18/2014 2:53:45 PM
Required maintenance? 8/22/2013 3:12:17 PM
woohoo the husband's bike is in the shop 10/16/2013 10:49:06 PM
Can you straighten a bike wheel? 11/26/2013 9:37:13 AM
April 2014 goals and resolutions 5/1/2014 7:50:05 AM

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